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August 2007

Lecture on the African Diaspora, by Micere Mugo
Sunday, August 5, 2007, 4:00 PM
Sonja Haynes Stone Center, Theatre and Auditorium, UNC-CH

Micere Mugo is a Kenyan scholar, feminist, socialist, writer, and community organizer who currently teaches in the U.S. She was forced to flee Kenya in 1982 and has been a Zimbabwean citizen since 1984. Professor Mugo is a passionate advocate for human rights especially as they have been historically denied to blacks, women, children, the masses and other marginalized groups.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Mamadou Diabante, Master of the Kora
Saturday, August 11, 2007, 7 PM-9 PM
Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

Experience the invigorating sounds of the kora, the ancient 21-string West African harp, in an exciting performance by Mamadou Diabante, named the "World Music Artist of the Year." He is one of a handful of remaining kora players that are keeping alive the kora tradition and serving as historians and storytellers. Part of the Global Education Distinguished Speaker Series.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Omar Ibn Said and the African Muslim Presence in the Americas
Thursday, August 16, 2007, 5 PM
Global Education Center, 4th Floor, UNC-CH

Panel discussion with UNC faculty members Carl Ernst, Lisa Lindsay, and Tim Marr. As part of our commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the enslavement of Omar Ibn Said, a West African enslaved in North Carolina, UNC scholars will explore the Islamic African experience in the 19th century. Issues discussed will include the Transatlantic slave trade, 19th-century Islam, and American perceptions of Islam.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Dance, Music, and Storytelling by Braima Moivai
Saturday, August 18, 2007, 10 AM-11 AM
Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

For the last decade, Braima has taught children of vaious ages about Africa by incorporating his own experience growing up as well as by focusing on the culture and arts of Sierra Leone. He uses a combination of drumming, dance, folktales, games, and hands-on activities to enliven the learning experience. Sponsored by the Carolina Navigators and the Center for African Studies.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Exhibit and Opening of "Muslims of the African American Diaspora 1400-1800's"
Tuesday, August 21, 2007,
Cameron Village Public Library

The exhibit brings to life America’s Islamic heritage with easy-to-comprehend text and eye-catching photographs of America’s early Islamic personalities, documents, writings, communities, and tombstones.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes
Saturday, August 25, 2007, 6:30PM-9:30PM
Global Education, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemproary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Teacher Workshop on "The World They Came From." Islamic Africa, the Slave Trade, and African Muslims in North Carolina and the US.
Monday, August 27, 2007, 12:00 PM- 5:00 PM
Cameron Village Public Library

Presentations by Dr. Sulayman Nyang, Howard University and Barbara Anderson, African Studies Center at UNC-CH. No charge, but please register.     Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Faculty Reception
Thursday, August 30, 2007, 6 PM
Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

An opportunity to welcome new and returning colleagues and to learn about funding available from the African Studies Center.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



September 2007

Open House & Information Sessions
Thursday, September 6, 2007, 11:00 A.M.-5:00 A.M.
Global Education Center, Room 4003

UNC provides countless opportunities to explore other cultures & to become more globally aware! In fact, the new FedEx Global Education Center (corner of Pittsboro & McCauley Streets) houses the university’s primary international units dedicated to global learning. Come to the OPEN HOUSE of the Global Education Center on September 6th from 11:00am to 3pm where you’ll be able to sample coffees (from the Global Cup Café) and goodies from countries all over the world! Plus, pick up brochures about international units and programs on campus, and speak with department representatives.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes
Thursday, September 27, 2007, 6:30PM-9:30PM
Global Education, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemproary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



November 2007

African Studies Center Fall 2007 Roundtable: Development, Poverty and HIV/AIDS; Actors, Policies and Advocacy
Thursday, November 1, 2007, 2:00 PM
Global Education Center, 4th Floor, UNC-CH

Seodi V.R White,lawyer and visiting scholar, University of Toronto, Canada will present the talk "Feminization of HIV and AIDS in Malawi: Can a Rights Approach Help?" with Professor Karen Booth, Women's Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill, responding. Also presented will be the talk "Development, Aid and Poverty: Contemporary Debates and Practices" presented by Dr. Alfred V. Nyasulu, assistant director, Debt and Aid Division, Ministry of Finance, Malawi and lecturer, Department of Economics, University of Malawi.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Dean's Lecture Series: "28: Telling the Human Stories Behind Africa's AIDS Pandemic" by Stephanie Nolen
Thursday, November 1, 2007, 4:00 PM
Michael Hooker Research Center, Auditorium

Stephanie Nolen lives in Johannesburg and writes about the impact of the AIDS pandemic in Africa for Canada’s national newspaper. She also reports on a wide range of other issues, including the political crisis in Zimbabwe, the oil industry in Nigeria, the aftermath of the genocide in Rwanda, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In 2003, 2004, and 2006, she was honored with the Amnesty International Award for Human Rights Reporting from war zones in Uganda and Sudan and has twice won the International Reporting award.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


History Corner: Who was Omar Ibn Sayyid?
Thursday, November 1, 2007, 4:15 PM- 5:00 PM
Cameron Village Public Library

2007 marks the 200th anniversary of the enslavement of Omar Ibn Sayyid (ca.1770-1864), a West African Muslim scholar who lived over 50 years as a slave in North Carolina. In the growing literature on African Muslim slaves in the Americas, Omar Ibn Sayyid is considered an important example. Sayyid’s autobiography, published in 1831, is the oldest surviving Muslim manuscript in North America.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Premier of "Prince Among Slaves" a PBS Documentary
Saturday, November 3, 2007, 2:00 PM- 4:00 PM
Hayti Heritage Center

"Prince Among Slaves" tells the true story of an African prince, Abdul Rahman Ibrahima Sori, who was sold into slavery in the American South in 1788. He remained enslaved for forty years before ultimately regaining his freedom and returning to Africa. It paints a vivid picture of the extraordinary times in which an extraordinary man lived, interweaving the universal themes of bondage and deliverance, pride and forbearance. Run time 90 minutes.   $10   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Islamic Africa Workshop
Saturday, November 10, 2007,
Global Education, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Co-sponsored by the African Studies Center and World View. All day, Lunch will be served.   Free.   Please Contact: Regina Higgins rkhiggin@email.unc.edu for more information.


Performance and Talk by Mamadou Diabate
Tuesday, November 13, 2007, TBA
Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

Mamadou Diabate is a master of the kora, the ancient 21-string West African harp. As his last name indicates, he comes from a family of griots, or jelis as they are known among the Manding, who are traditional historians, genealogists, and story-tellers as well as musicians. After touring the U.S. in 1996 as part of the Instrumental Ensemble of Mali, Mamadou decided to stay in the U.S. and now calls it home. His performance will be followed by a talk and Q & A.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


International Education Week:"Get-A-Passport Drive"
Wednesday, November 14, 2007 - Thursday, November 15, 2007, 10:00 AM- 3:00 PM
Carolina Union, Room 1505, UNC-CH/ Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

One-stop passport shopping for students, faculty and staff! Officials from the U.S. Department of State will be on campus for two days to accept applications and payment and to answer questions. Get your passport photos on site for $10!     Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Footprints of Africa, a festival of African cultures
Tuesday, November 27, 2007 - Saturday, December 1, 2007,
Elon University

Hosted by Elon University's Periclean Scholars, the festival will include forums on African literature, history, and the African immigrant experience; workshops on African dance and craft making; live music; documentary screenings; and a banquet of West African cuisine. Events will occur in several central locations on Elon campus and are free and open to the public with the exception of the West African dinner.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



December 2007

“Music and Public Health: HIV/AIDS Education in Malawi”
Monday, December 3, 2007, 12:00 PM- 1:00 PM
Blue Cross Blue Shield Auditorium, Michael Hooker Research Center, UNC School of Public Health, UNC-CH

E. Jackson Allison, Jr., MD, MPH, FACPM, Former Chief of Staff, VA Hospital, Asheville, NC, Former Peace Corps Volunteer in Malawi and Alumni of UNC School of Public Health will present this talk sponsored by the Office of Global Health in the UNC School of Public Health.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



January 2008

Faces of Change
Thursday, January 24, 2008, 5:00 PM
Global Education Center, Room 1505, UNC-CH

The Carolina Women’s Center is pleased to present the North Carolina premiere of Faces of Change as part of the 27th Annual MLK Birthday Celebration. This powerful documentary features grassroots activists from different corners of the world who go behind the camera to find a voice denied to them because of their social, racial, gender, or ethnic background. Director Michele Stephenson armed five activists with cameras and sent them to explore their communities in Brazil, India, Mauritania, Bulgaria and the United States in preparation for the UN World Conference Against Racism in Durban, South Africa. These unique video dispatches relay the stunning commonalities of their histories and experiences. Discussion with the filmmaker to follow.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes
Thursday, January 24, 2008, 6:30PM-9:30PM
Global Education, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This month's speaker will be Angel David Nieves, Assistant Professor of Historic Preservation in the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at the University of Maryland at College Park. Dr. Nieves will speak on "Sites of 'Post-Conflict' Memory: Monument-Making, Commemoration, and Social Justice in Rwanda & South Africa." This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemproary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Emancipated Slaves and Runaway Wives
Friday, January 25, 2008, 12:00 PM
Hamilton Hall, Room 569, UNC-CH

Professor Emily Burrill, from the Department of History at the University of Kentucky will present a talk on the topic of "Emancipated Slaves and Runaway Wives: Gendered Negotiations of Slavery and Marriage in Early Twentieth Century French Soudan (Southern Mali)." Interested students are encouraged to attend.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


No Easy Victories Book Party
Wednesday, January 30, 2008, 3:30 PM
Bull's Head Bookshop, UNC-CH

Join editors Charles Cobb, Jr., Gail Hovey, and Bill Minter for a book party celebrating the release of No Easy Victories: African Liberation and American Activists over a Half Century, 1950-2000, a book of essays and personal stories about the links between African liberation movements and American activists. The book includes a foreword by Nelson Mandela.   Free.   Please Contact: Ursula Littlejohn ulittlej@email.unc.edu for more information.


Alan Mikhail
Wednesday, January 30, 2008, 5:00 PM
Hamilton Hall, Room 569, UNC-CH

Alan Mikhail, History department candidate who will receive his Ph.D. this spring from UC-Berkeley, will present a talk entitled "How to Build Ships in Ottoman Suez: A History of Food and Wood in Early-Modern North Africa" for interested students and faculty. Mikhail's dissertation is on Egypt under the Ottomans in the 18th century, and particularly the politics of water control.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film Screening
Wednesday, January 30, 2008, 7:00 PM
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room

Oscar nominated director and producer Connie Field will screen and discuss her documentary film Have You Heard from Johannesburg?: Apartheid and the Club of the West, the fourth segment in a six-part series that traces the complex story of the anti-apartheid movement in the United States and how the nationwide campaign successfully reversed American policy toward South Africa. Visit www.clarityfilms.org for more information about the documentary film series.   Free.   Please Contact: info@clarityfilms.org for more information.



February 2008

Faculty Course Development Grant Applications due
Friday, February 1, 2008, 5:00 PM

With these grants, the ASC supports faculty who are interested in developing Africa related courses for the curriculum in any field. Courses should have at least 75% Africa-related content. A course syllabus and submission for new course approval must follow the award.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Lecture by Egyptian Artist Ghada Amer
Tuesday, February 5, 2008, 6:00 PM
Global Education Center, UNC-CH

Ghada Amer embroiders her paintings with delicate traceries of stray threads to create a visual shift between abstract expressionism and representation of the erotic. This talk is part of the Hanes Art Series sponsored by UNC Department of Art.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Mona Hassan
Wednesday, February 6, 2008, 2:00 PM
Hamilton Hall, Room 569, UNC-CH

Mona Hassan, History department candidate who will receive her Ph.D. in Near Eastern Studies at Princeton this spring, will present a talk for interested students and faculty. Her wide-ranging dissertation compares the "loss of caliphate" in 1258 (the fall of the Abassids) and 1924 (the end of the Ottoman Empire) throughout the Islamic world.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Wolof Oral Texts
Thursday, February 28, 2008, 3:30 PM
Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Marame Gueye of East Carolina University will present a lecture, "Lost in Translation: Wolof Oral Texts and the Challenges of Translating Culture."   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Filmmaker Haile Gerima Lecture
Thursday, February 28, 2008, 7:00 PM
Stone Center

Haile Gerima will visit the Stone Center for a weeklong residency. Gerima, a film professor at Howard University whose films include "Sankofa"(1994) and "Ashes & Embers" (1982), will present a lecture on his past and present film projects. Gerima will also conduct a 3-part master workshop in filmmaking. The FREE workshops are open to all aspiring filmmakers or to those interested in filmmaking. Class size is limited; please call the Stone Center at (919) 962-9001 to register or email Ursula Littlejohn. The workshop sessions are: Monday, February 25- Scriptwriting & Directing; Wednesday, February 27- Documentary Filmmaking; and Friday, February 29- Film Directing & Visual Dramatics.   Free.   Please Contact: Ursula Littlejohn ulittlej@email.unc.edu for more information.


Performance by Urban Bush Women and Compagnie Jant-Bi
Thursday, February 28, 2008, 8:00 PM
Memorial Hall, UNC-CH

Based in Brooklyn, New York, Urban Bush Women is a company of seven women who have sought to bring the untold stories of disenfranchised people to light through dance. Compagnie Jant-Bi is based in Senegal, West Africa and comprised of seven men. Their Artistic Director is Germaine Acogny, called “The Mother of African Contemporary Dance,” who has developed a dance technique combining traditional West African dance with elements of classical ballet and Western modern dance. For ticket information contact Memorial Hall Box Office.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



March 2008

Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes
Thursday, March 6, 2008, 6:30PM-9:30PM
Global Education Center, Room 105, UNC-CH

This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. This session's speaker is Dr. Patrick Bond, who will speak on "Climate, Energy and Water Crises: South Africa and the World." Please note that this meeting was originally scheduled for February 28 but has been re-scheduled for March 6, and the room has been changed to room 1005. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes
Thursday, March 20, 2008, 6:30PM-9:30PM
Global Education Center, Room 3024, UNC-CH

This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. This session's speaker is Dr. Eyamba Bokamba, Professor of Linguistics at the University of Illinois. Please note that this meeting was originally scheduled for March 27 but has been re-scheduled for March 20, and the room has been changed to room 3024. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


World View 2008 Spring Seminar: Understanding Contemporary Africa
Wednesday, March 26, 2008 - Thursday, March 27, 2008, 12:30 PM Wed.- 4:30 PM Thur.
The Friday Center

World View, an international program for educators based at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is hosting this extensive seminar. Beginning at 12:30pm, Wednesday and adjourning at 4:00pm, Thursday, speakers and workshops will cover a range of issues including Globalization in Africa, the crisis in Sudan, education in Africa, and the historical roots of contemporary Africa.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



April 2008

Planning to Go to Africa for a Service or Internship Program?
Thursday, April 3, 2008, 5:00 PM- 7:00 PM
Campus Y, Faculty Lounge, UNC-CH

Come to an orientation workshop just for you! A Light Dinner will be served! Experienced student and faculty panelists will share and answer questions. Gain a deeper awareness of the political, social, economic and ethical issues around your travel, both the potential successes that you may achieve, and the problems and complex meanings of your proposed work. Follow-up workshop when you return! Please RSVP: Lucy Lewis at the Campus Y: lwlewis@email.unc.edu 962-2084 Co-sponsored by the African Studies Center, the morehead-cain foundation, and the Campus Y.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


2005 Nobel Prize Nominee Wahu Kaara Speaks on the Kenyan Political Crisis
Wednesday, April 9, 2008, 7:00 PM
Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

A parliamentary candidate in Kenya's recent tumultuous elections, and a leading advocate for social justice, Wahu Kaara has played an instrumental role in shaping and deepening the debate around economic policy and constitution-making at the local levels, with a specific focus on how these impact women. Her speech will cover the recent elections and the state of gender equality in Kenya.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Islam and the Secular State
Friday, April 18, 2008, Time TBA
Global Education Center Auditorium, UNC-CH

Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im, Professor of Law, at Emory University will speak on "Islam and the Secular State: Negotiating the Future of Shari`a."   Free.   Please Contact: Dr. Eunice Sahle (919) 966-2588 eunice@email.unc.edu for more information.


Spirit of Uganda
Wednesday, April 23, 2008, 7:30 PM
Memorial Hall, UNC

Spirit of Uganda presents riveting programs of music and dance for audiences of all ages. To the melodic tones of standing drums, with dramatic choreography, bright, layered rhythms and gorgeous call-and-response vocals, a vibrant cast of performers, aged 8-18, oscillates between ferocity and softness as they bring to life the sounds and movements of East Africa.   UNC Students $10, Others $40/35/25/20   Please Contact: Memorial Hall Box Office 919-843-3333 for more information.


Judith Byfield, Cornell University, "Lessons From Labor: The Impact of Labor Unions on the Abeokuta Women’s Union"
Thursday, April 24, 2008, 6:30 PM
Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



June 2008

Reproductive Health in Southern Africa
Monday, June 9, 2008, 12:00-1:00
Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center invites you to join us for a Brown Bag Lunch with Dr. Roland Edgar (Eddie) Mhlanga. Dr. Mhlanga is an alumnus and now adjunct faculty in the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the School of Public Health, who is currently Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at University of Kwazulu-Natal in Durban, South Africa. He will be presenting a talk on Reproductive Health in Southern Africa. Drinks and dessert will be provided.   Free.   Please Contact: Trude Bennett trude_bennett@unc.edu for more information.



September 2008

Global Education Center Open House
Wednesday, September 3, 2008, 11 AM - 1:00 PM
Global Education Center, Peacock Atrium, UNC-CH

Join us for an OPEN HOUSE at the FedEx Global Education Center at UNC-CH where you'll be able to sample coffees (from the Global Cup Cafe) and goodies from countries all over the world! Plus, pick up brochures about international units and programs on campus, and speak with department representatives.     Please Contact: Laura Griest lauragriest@unc.edu for more information.


Playmakers Repertory Company presents In the Continuum
Wednesday, September 10, 2008 - Sunday, September 14, 2008,
Kenan Theatre, UNC

The powerful story of two black women, one in South Central Los Angeles and one in Harare, Zimbabwe, whose contemporaneous HIV diagnoses bring the international AIDS epidemic down to very human, very personal terms. Hailed by The New York Times as one of the Ten Best Plays of 2005, it’s gone on to become an international event. Web information is available at Playmakers Repertory Company     Please Contact: Kenan Theatre for more information.


Faculty Reception
Wednesday, September 17, 2008, 4:30-6:00 PM
Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

An opportunity to welcome new and returning colleagues and to learn about funding available from the African Studies Center.     Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Returning from a service or internship program in Africa?
Come to a follow-up workshop just for you!

Thursday, September 25, 2008, 5:30-7:30
Campus Y Faculty Lounge, UNC

We know your time in Africa was important on many levels. Come share and reflect on it with other students and faculty! Also – please bring an item from your time in Africa that has meaning for you and we will share stories. Light refreshments served. What will you get out of this? • a deeper awareness of the political, social, economic and ethical issues around your travel, both the successes that you may have achieved, and the problems and complex meanings of your work. • the opportunity to reflect on your experiences with others and to think about what comes next for you. Please RSVP to Lucy Lewis at the Campus Y: lwlewis@email.unc.edu 962-2084     Please Contact: Barbara Anderson 962-1406 b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


{it is in you}
Friday, September 26, 2008 - Saturday, September 27, 2008, 8:00 PM
Gerrard Hall

{it is in you} explores the politics of development, HIV, and the body through storytelling, dance, live music, and the spoken word. Discussion and East African food follow the performance. {it is in you} is rooted in the generously shared, deeply joyful and motion-centric nature of East African culture. All are warmly welcomed: It is In You exists as an experiment in gathering people invested in public health, performance and global politics/development to share with and learn from one another, in order to honor the stories and insights of educators, students and artists in Tanzania. This project began at Tanzania's University of Dar er Salaam, where UNC graduate Marie Garlock (International/African Studies, Performance Studies, Soc/Econ Justice) studied in 2007, and continues here with your presence and input, as part of the Process Series: New Works in Development.   Free and open to the public.   Please Contact: the Office of the Executive Director of the Arts (919) 843-7776 for seat reservations and for more information.


Asylum Denied: A Refugee's Struggle for Asylum in America
Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 7:00 PM
Global Education Center Auditorium, UNC-CH

Lecture by David Ngaruri Kenney and Philip G. Schrag on the struggle from the dungeons of the Kenyan torture chambers to the labyrinth of the U.S. immigration system.     Please Contact: Deborah Weissman weissman@email.unc.edu for more information.



October 2008

DARFUR NOW Screening
Monday, October 6, 2008, 7 PM
Union Auditorium

Darfur Now is a call to action for people everywhere to help end the crisis in Darfur. In this film, the struggles and achievements of six very different individuals bring to light the situation in Darfur and the need to get involved.The screening will be followed by a panel discussion headed by Prof. Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja, Professor of African Studies at UNC and Prof. Bereket Habte Selassie, a William E. Leuchtenburg Prof. of African Studies and Prof. of Law at UNC.This is an incredible opportunity for anyone and everyone who is interested in learning and getting involved, even for those who don't know much about what's going on in Darfur.Sponsored by S.U.D.A.N (Students United for Darfur Awareness Now).   Free.   Please Contact: swathi sekar 786-543-3417 sswathi@email.unc.edu for more information.


Democracy for Whom? South Africa’s Transition since 1994 - Dr. Dale McKinley
Thursday, October 9, 2008, 6:30 - 9:00 PM
Room 3024, Global Education Center, UNC-CH

Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemproary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. This month's guest speaker is Dr. Dale McKinley. Utilizing original (and ongoing) oral history and social movement research, as well as the personal and political-activist experiences of the presenter, the talk will critically investigate the character and content of the democracy that South Africa has enjoyed since 1994. Some of the key questions that will be asked are: What are poor people saying about their post-1994 ‘freedom’? Why does South Africa remain the most unequal society in the world? Has the ruling African National Congress lost its political and moral compass? Where is South Africa headed?). Dr. McKinley is an independent researcher-lecturer and social-political activist who has lived and worked in Johannesburg, South Africa since 1990. He was a UNC student and activist in the mid-late 1980s.     Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


The Street Children of Kinshasa: Trying to Survive in a Nation of Paradox.
Wednesday, October 22, 2008, 5pm
Hooker Bldg. UNC-CH SPH Blue Cross Blue Shield Auditorium

This documentary, shown as part of Breaking the Silence: Congo Week, follows the more than 100,000 AIDs orphans in the capital city, Kinshasa, as they attempt to make a difference in their own lives.     Please Contact: Heather Davis heatherdavis@unc.edu for more information.


World View's K-12 2008 Global Education Symposium
Wednesday, October 22, 2008 - Thursday, October 23, 2008, All day
Friday Center, UNC-CH

This Symposium, entitled "Bringing World Cultures to the Classroom," will bring together over 425 K-12 educators for workshops and presentations.     Please Contact: Katherine Lang khlang@email.unc.edu for more information.


Papy: My Story...
Friday, October 24, 2008, 5pm
Hooker Bldg. UNC-CH SPH Blue Cross Blue Shield Auditorium

Based on a true story, director Djo Tunda wa Munga brings attention to the over 100,000 people in the Kinshasa living with HIV through the story of one individual and his struggle to make decisions about his life. Presented as part of Breaking the Silence: Congo Week. In Lingala with English subtitles.     Please Contact: Heather Davis heatherdavis@unc.edu for more information.


Research, Ethics, Culture and IRBs
Tuesday, October 28, 2008, 6:00-7:15 PM
Murphey 116, UNC-CH

This 75-minute seminar is designed for undergraduates considering study abroad, international service learning, research or community outreach programs that may or may not involve research. The objective of this seminar is to shed light on some of the cultural, ethical and research issues involved in these types of activities. It is surprisingly easy to violate the boundaries of ethical research and culturally appropriate behavior, and the repercussions for doing so, for both students and faculty, are potentially serious. Sharing photographs online, posting video on youtube, participating in discussion forums and blogging are all typical ways students report on or share their experiences, usually with little awareness that they might be violating research ethics and IRB (institutional review board) regulations or otherwise showing a lack of cultural sensitivity. This seminar teaches the dos and don'ts of community and global outreach, so students will be well-equipped to actively engage in their global or local experience. Seminar faculty include: Barbara Anderson (UNC, African Studies), Lawrence Rosenfeld (UNC, Dept. of Communication Studies) and Trude Bennett (UNC SPH, Office of Human Research Ethics). Make your experience count: know before you go! Pizza and drinks will be served.     Please Contact: Mamie Harris msackey@email.unc.edu for more information.


Black Gold Film Screening and Ghanian Drumming Performance
Thursday, October 30, 2008, 7 PM
Global Cup Cafe, FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-CH

Ghanian drummer Habib Yazdi will kick off the event with a live performance followed by a screening of Marc and Nick Francis' 2006 documentary film Black Gold. This thought provoking documentary follows Tadesse Meskela, manager of Oromia Coffee Farmer's Co-operative Union in Ethiopia, as he travels throughout the Western world searching for buyers willing to pay a fair price for the co-op's coffee. Black Gold explores the complexities of the multi-billion dollar global coffee industry, juxtaposing the impoverished situation of many Ethiopian coffee farmers with New York City commodity traders and coffee connoisseurs. Q & A led by Counter Culture Coffee's Lydia Troxler following the screening. Enjoy complimentary Ethiopian coffee while you watch!   Free.   Please Contact: sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



November 2008

World View Symposium on Globalization and Global Health
Wednesday, November 12, 2008 - Thursday, November 13, 2008, 1 1/2 days
Friday Center, UNC-CH

NOW OPEN TO K-12 EDUCATORS Join us as we explore how we are connected to the world through the lens of global health. It’s difficult to understand globalization in our interconnected world without a solid grounding in global health issues. This program’s goals are to provide that background, inspire educators to integrate these issues in their daily instruction, and give them the resources to do so. This program is designed for faculty and administrators in all disciplines, and is suitable for K-12 educators. Leading scholars from Duke University, North Carolina State, and UNC at Chapel Hill will address the major issues of global health in an age of globalization. Small group sessions will focus on a range of global health topics. College-based teams will meet with a faculty advisor to develop a global initiative plan. Please visit the Symposium Website for more information.   $150 per person. $500 for a Team of 4 individuals   Please Contact: Julie Kinnaird jmarante@email.unc.edu for more information.


What Now Mr. President? A Discussion of Post Election Politics
Thursday, November 13, 2008, 6:30 PM
Sonja Haynes Stone Center, Hitchcock Room, UNC-CH

O.A.S.I.S ACTS, a subgroup of the Organization for African Students' Interest and Solidarity (O.A.S.I.S) will be hosting "What Now Mr. President? A Discussion of Post Election Politics." The purpose of the forum is to discuss the presidential campaigns, the media’s influence on the election and the expectations of President elect Barack Obama. The forum will specifically focus on: Race Relations, The War on Terror and Foreign Relations, Global Financial Crisis, The Media’s Impact on the Election. The forum will feature Dr. Perry Hall of the African and Afro-American Studies, Dr. Hodding Carter of the Public Policy department and Dr. Jonathan Weiler of the International Studies department.     Please Contact: Alexandra Zagbayou zalexand@email.unc.edu for more information.


African Studies Association 2008 Annual Meeting
“Knowledge of Africa: The Next Fifty Years”

Thursday, November 13, 2008 - Sunday, November 16, 2008, All day
Chicago, IL

The ASA will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first Annual Meeting during the 51st Annual Meeting this year in Chicago, IL. For more information please visit the ASA Web Site.     Please Contact: members@rci.rutgers.edu for more information.


Visualizing Human RIghts Anti-Conference
Saturday, November 15, 2008, 9 AM - 6 PM
Global Education Center Auditorium, UNC-CH

Every day ordinary people at home and abroad struggle to maintain their human dignity in the face of hunger, lack of adequate housing and health care, and the repressive and neglectful actions and omissions of their governments. What do these human rights abuses look like? How do they feel? How are human rights and wrongs experienced in personal terms, and what difference do they make to our lives? In an unconventional forum, "Visualizing Human Rights" brings together painters, photographers, writers, poets, film makers, and print makers to put a human face on human rights in an effort to reach beyond traditional academic approaches. Dick Gordon from WUNC's "The Story" will lead the opening segment. Registration is free and encouraged as space is limited. More Info.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Domestic and International Perspectives on the Obama Victory
Monday, November 17, 2008, 12-1:30 PM.
Dey Hall, Toy Lounge, UNC-CH

A Roundtable with Mark Driscoll (Asian Studies), Arturo Escobar (Anthropology Department), Rachel Murphey-Brown (African & Afro-American Studies), Eunice Sahle (African & Afro-American Studies). Organized by the UNC-CH Department of African & Afro-American Studies     Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Dr. Robert Thornton
Unimagined Community: Sex, Networks, and AIDS in Uganda and South Africa

Monday, November 17, 2008, 2:00 PM
Global Education Center Auditorium, UNC-CH

This groundbreaking work, with its unique anthropological approach, sheds new light on a central conundrum surrounding AIDS in Africa. Robert J. Thornton explores why HIV prevalence fell during the 1990s in Uganda despite that country's having one of Africa's highest fertility rates, while during the same period HIV prevalence rose in South Africa, the country with Africa's lowest fertility rate. Thornton finds that culturally and socially determined differences in the structure of sexual networks—rather than changes in individual behavior—were responsible for these radical differences in HIV prevalence. Incorporating such factors as property, mobility, social status, and political authority into our understanding of AIDS transmission, Thornton's analysis also suggests new avenues for fighting the disease worldwide. Hosted by HIV Narratives and the African Studies Center.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Global Connections: Get a Passport Drive
Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 10 AM - 3 PM
Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Take advantage of this easy one-stop shopping opportunity to apply for or to renew a U.S. passport!! Officials from the U.S. Department of State will be on campus to accept passport applications (forms provided on site) and to answer questions. You can also get passport photos taken. The Passport Drive is also offered on Wednesday, November 19th from 10am-3pm at the Union. For more information on required materials and payment, please visit this Information Site.     Please Contact: Laura Griest lauragriest@unc.edu for more information.


Peace Corps Interest Session: Henry McCoy
Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 4:00-5:30 PM.
Global Education Center, Room 2008, UNC-CH

Henry McKoy, Regional Director, Africa Peace Corps will hold a session with students, returned Peace Corps volunteers, and recently nominated students. Mr. McKoy will discuss his experience in Africa and the Peace Corps and about volunteer work abroad. The session will be informal and an opportunity for students to meet previous volunteers.   Free.   Please Contact: Chinyere Alu peacecorps@unc.edu for more information.


Networking Night for International Careers
Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 5:30-7 PM
Global Education Center, Peacock Atrium, UNC-CH

Meet with over 20 local working professionals in an informal environment to make contacts working in a variety of international careers. This event is open to UNC Chapel Hill students at all levels, all majors, except students in the MBA, MAC, Medical, Dental, or Law programs. Refreshments will be served. Business casual attire recommended. Hosted by University Career Services. RSVP online at the University Career Services website.   Free, RSVP required.   Please Contact: Laura Griest lauragriest@unc.edu for more information.


Dr. Robert Thornton
Siliimu As 'Native Medical Category':
AIDS as Local Knowledge in Uganda

Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 6:30-9:00 PM
Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Dr. Robert Thornton, of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, will be speaking about working across populations and cultures in a small South African town. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemproary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


DarfurFast
Monday, November 24, 2008, 7 PM
Campus Y, UNC-CH

Students United for Darfur Awareness Now, S.U.D.A.N., is hosting DarfurFast. Students choose one luxury item and fast from it for a day, donating the money they would have spent to Mercy Corps, a respected relief organization that provides humanitarian aid to the Darfur refugees, many of whom are still in danger of being attacked. This year, we will be using the money to build wells in camps so women and families can safely get water. On the 24th, participants are invited to break the fast at 7pm in the Union Cabaret. There will be lots of food donated by local restaurants.~ S.U.D.A.N. (Students United for Darfur Awareness Now), Committee of the Campus-Y   Donation   Please Contact: Nada Mussad mussad@email.unc.edu for more information.



December 2008

Not Just Words: The Remarkable Resilience of Human Rights
Wednesday, December 3, 2008, 5:00 PM
Global Education Center Auditorium, UNC-CH

Professor Michael Byers, Canada Research Chair in Global Politics and International Law at the University of British Columbia, will give a public lecture on human rights and social movements in contemporary Africa.   Free.   Please Contact: Eunice Sahle eunice@email.unc.edu for more information.


Human Rights, Global Institutions, and Social Movements in Contemporary Africa
Thursday, December 4, 2008, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM
Global Education Center, Room 1005, UNC-CH

Conference on major issues in Contemporary Africa, such as Human Rights, Global Institutions, and Social Movements. This will be followed by roundtable discussions on: Accumulation by Dispossession and Struggles for Human Rights in Africa, Health and Human Rights, and Global Institutions and Contemporary Human Rights Struggles.   Free and Open to the Public.   Please Contact: Eunice Sahle eunice@email.unc.edu for more information.



January 2009

The Rise of the Almohads: Identity and Belief in North Africa
Dr. Allen Fromherz

Friday, January 23, 2009, 2 PM
Hamilton Hall, Room 569, UNC-CH

Allen Fromherz is a Department of History candidate and a pre-modern North African Historian. He received his PhD at St. Andrews in Scotland in 2006 and is currently an assistant professor at Georgia State. His book, The Rise of the Almohads: Islam, Identity and Belief in North Africa, is being published by I.B. Tauris, and he is currently writing a contextualized biography of Ibn Khaldun.     Please Contact: Sarah Shields sshields@email.unc.edu for more information.


Dr. Cihan Muslu
Monday, January 26, 2009, 3 PM
Hamilton Hall, Room 569, UNC-CH

Cihan Muslu is a Department of History candidate and a pre-modern North African Historian. She has a PhD in History and Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard (2007) and is currently an assistant professor at the University of Texas as Dallas. Her dissertation is on the diplomatic relationship between the Mamluks and Ottomans, mostly in the 15th century.     Please Contact: Sarah Shields sshields@email.unc.edu for more information.


Law, society, and politics: An integrated history of the great
transformations of ninth-century Egypt
Ahmed El Shamsy

Thursday, January 29, 2009, 3 PM
Hyde Hall, Room 210

Ahmed El Shamsy is a candidate in the Department of History. He is completing his dissertation, entitled "From Tradition to Law: the Origins and Early Development of the Shafi'i School of Law in Ninth-Century Egypt,"and will receive his PhD in History and Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard this spring.     Please Contact: Sarah Shields sshields@email.unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes
A New Paradigm of the African State: Fundi wa Afrika
Dr. Mueni wa Muiu & Dr. Guy Martin

Thursday, January 29, 2009, 6:30PM-9:30PM
Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. This session's speakers are Dr. Mueni wa Muiu & Dr. Guy Martin, both of Winston Salem State University. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.     Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Black Women in the Academy:
Strategies for Survival, Success, and Transformation

Friday, January 30, 2009 - Saturday, January 31, 2009, All day.
Friday Center, UNC-CH

The “Black Women in the Academy” symposium will continue the important dialogue that was begun during previous Black Women in the Academy conferences that were held at the national level in 1994 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and in 1999 at Howard University. Previous conferences have provided a public forum to focus on the experiences of black women in a variety of disciplines and at all ranks within academic institutions, from graduate school to the college presidency. The Black Women in the Academy symposium will address topics of interest to undergraduate students, graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, faculty and administrators. The first day of the symposium will include a panel presentation by notable scholars contextualizing the unique sets of challenges that African American women face in academic institutions. The second day of the symposium will include workshops and break-out sessions that will provide participants with tools and strategies to move through academia at all levels. These sessions will address issues such as the graduate school process, tenure and promotion, the role of senior faculty, and administrative positions. These sessions will be open to members of the UNC community, as well as students, faculty, and administrators from colleges and universities throughout North Carolina, as well as other states. The symposium schedule, registration, and hotel information are available at: Conference Website.     Please Contact: Kia Caldwell klcaldwe@email.unc.edu for more information.



February 2009

Performances for Peace: A Diary of Darfur
Emmanuel Jal

Friday, February 6, 2009, 7 PM
Memorial Hall, UNC-CH

By the time Emmanuel Jal was seven years old, he was already fighting in the rebel army in Sudan. For five years, he fought in Sudan's bloody civil war. Today, he is a child soldier turned hip hop artist, channeling his childhood pain into songs. Jal will be speaking at UNC-Chapel Hill's Memorial Hall on February 6th. In 2008, Jal released a new album, "Warchild," and has appeared in film festivals to promote an award-winning documentary on his life. His autobiography will be released in the Spring of 2009. Watch him on Youtube UNC Students United for Darfur Awareness Now (SUDAN) is hosting "Performances for Peace: A Diary of Darfur" in the hopes that Jal's narrative will inspire a community dialogue about the current genocide in Darfur. Proceeds from the $3 ticket price will go directly to aid current refugees living in dangerous conditions in Sudanese camps, where innocent people are in danger of being raped, tortured, and killed. The UNC Loreleis, Modern Inversions, Zankiliwa, and EROT will open for Jal.   $3   Please Contact: Julian March jmarch@email.unc.edu for more information.


Africa Week 2009
Monday, February 16, 2009 - Saturday, February 21, 2009,

The student group O.A.S.I.S. (Organization of African Students’ Interests & Solidarity) will host Africa Week with events open to the public. The group notes that "individuals turn a blind eye to the transgressions being inflicted on others, [which] represents an obstacle that O.A.S.I.S. hopes to confront during Africa Week. The activities planned throughout the week (a stimulation of an African market, an African dance workshop, a candlelight vigil, a lecture on the Congo crisis, a fashion show to name a few) are meant to acknowledge the dichotomy of "Unspoken Truths" across the African continent... While we cannot speak for all of these individuals, we hope to enlighten you on their truths throughout this week." Events to be held this week are listed separately on the ASC calendar.  More info     Please Contact: O.A.S.I.S. mhlaba@email.unc.edu for more information.


Market Place
Monday, February 16, 2009, 10 AM to 2 PM
Polk Place, UNC-CH

This event is a mini-market simulation. O.A.S.I.S members will be dressed in native attire, serve food, dance, and play African music in Polk place. We will also have a vendor sell African jewelry, bags and clothes.   Free and open to the public   Please Contact: O.A.S.I.S. mhlaba@email.unc.edu for more information.


African Dance Workshop
Monday, February 16, 2009, 8 PM to 9 PM
Fetzer Gym Fencing Room, UNC-CH

This workshop will be held by Zankiliwa. It will give students an opportunity to learn some traditional African moves from various parts of Africa . No experience necessary.   Free and open to the public   Please Contact: O.A.S.I.S. mhlaba@email.unc.edu for more information.


Lecture: Crisis in the Congo by Dr. Nzongola
Tuesday, February 17, 2009, 7 PM
Nelson Mandela Auditorium, FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-CH

In this lecture Dr. Nzongola will discuss how the Democratic Republic of the Congo ’s political history, wealth of natural resources and relationships with foreign countries have set the stage for the current crisis in eastern Congo . In addition to this, Dr. Nzongola will address the international community’s response to the Congo ’s crisis and the human rights violations that have occurred as a result of the crisis.   Free and open to the public   Please Contact: O.A.S.I.S. mhlaba@email.unc.edu for more information.


Candle Light Vigil
Wednesday, February 18, 2009, 6 PM
Wilson Hall, UNC-CH

This event will commemorate the lives of those who have died or whose lives are impacted by sex trafficking, child labor, child soldiers, inaccessibility to medical supplies, malnutrition and female genital mutilation. We will share the testimonies of survivors and have guest performers throughout the event.   Free and open to the public   Please Contact: O.A.S.I.S. mhlaba@email.unc.edu for more information.


Documentary Screening and Discussion: Stolen Childhoods
Thursday, February 19, 2009, 6 PM
Nelson Mandela Auditorium, FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-CH

This movie will address the issue of child labor from a global perspective. The discussion following will be lead by UNC professors who focus on international human rights and global economics and will give students an opportunity to pose questions concerning the issue of child labor.   Free and open to the public   Please Contact: O.A.S.I.S. mhlaba@email.unc.edu for more information.


Foreign Language Teaching Workshop
Thursday, February 19, 2009 - Friday, February 20, 2009, 8:30-4:30
Global Education Center, Room 2008, UNC-CH

This workshop intends to provide a venue for all instructors of Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTL) to interact and exchange views as well as figure out how to improve their teaching and their students’ learning experience at UNC. Dr. Antonia Schleicher, Director of the National African Language Resource Center at Wisconsin-Madison, will introduce and elaborate on the components of the standards for foreign language learning, best known as five Cs: Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities. After being exposed to these standards, each individual or group will be expected to draft a document for the standards for learning and teaching his or her language of expertise in a communicative classroom. A template for that document will be provided. More information To register please contact Barbara Anderson.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


The Osun Grove of Osogbo, Nigeria, as a World Heritage Site
The Denial and Dilemma of Archaeology

Friday, February 20, 2009, 3 PM
Hyde Hall, Room 210

Talk given by Akin Ogundiran of UNC-Charlotte, Chair of the Department of Africana Studies. In 2005, UNESCO inscribed the Osun-Osogbo Grove (Nigeria) as a World Heritage site. The grove is the most visited indigenous sacred site in Africa south of the Sahara and is the sacred home of African Atlantic world goddess, Osun. This presentation examines the cultural politics of modernity and tradition that reconstructed the sacred space of Osun-Osogbo in post-colonial Nigeria and the total absence of archaeology in the nomination of the site for World Heritage status. The presentation will draw attention to recent archaeological investigations within the sacred grove and the implications of the findings for transforming current narratives about the grove. Co-sponsored by the Archaeology Curriculum Program and the African Studies Center.   Free.   Please Contact: Brenda Moore bmoore@email.unc.edu for more information.


Oil, Power, and Social Stability
Friday, February 20, 2009 - Saturday, February 21, 2009, 4:30 PM Friday- 1PM Saturday
Center for School Leadership Development, UNC -CH

This seminar will feature faculty from physics, political science, African and Afro-American studies, and environmental policy to explore the relationship between oil resources, political power, and social stability. Speakers will consider what we know about world-wide oil resources generally, as well as focusing on different case studies around the globe, in Africa, Latin America, and the former Soviet Union. Please visit the Program Website for detailed schedule and renewal credits for teachers.   $120, $60 for teachers   Please Contact: Caroline Dyar caroline_dyar@unc.edu for more information.


Africa Night: Unspoken Truths
Saturday, February 21, 2009, Dinner- 5:30 PM Show- 7 PM to 9 PM
Great Hall, UNC-CH

This cultural event will feature a play, fashion show, dance and spoken word performances. It is the biggest and oldest African cultural show in the state of North Carolina. Unspoken Truths is the culminating event of Africa Week, hosted by O.A.S.I.S., The Organization for African Student's Interests & Solidarity.     Please Contact: O.A.S.I.S. mhlaba@email.unc.edu for more information.


Exploring the Historical Roots and Contemporary Development of Sufi Islam
in West Africa: Senegal as Example
Dr. Cheikh Anta Babou

Wednesday, February 25, 2009, 6 PM
Global Education Center, Room 1009, UNC-CH

Cheikh A. Babou teaches African History and the History of Islam in Africa at U Penn. He is the author of Fighting the Greater Jihad: Amadu Bamba and the Founding of the Muridiyya of Senegal, 1853-1913 (Ohio University Press, 2007). Dr. Babou’s articles have appeared in African Affairs, Journal of African History, International Journal of African Historical Studies, Journal of Religion in Africa and in other scholarly journals in the United States and in France. His current research project examines the experience of West African Muslim immigrants in Europe and North America.   Free.   Please Contact: Mamarame Seck mseck@email.unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes
Dr. Parker Shipton

Thursday, February 26, 2009, 6:30PM-9:30PM
Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. This session's topic is "Sacred Sequence: Order and Violation in Kenya" by Dr. Parker Shipton, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Research Fellow in African Studies at Boston University and currently a Fellow of the National Humanities Center. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.     Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


UNITY NC African Arts Conference
Friday, February 27, 2009 - Sunday, March 1, 2009, All day.
Barriskill Dance Theater School, 3642 Shannon Road, Durham, NC

Join UNITY NC for a weekend designed to unite people of all cultures thrugh the African arts of dancing, drumming, storytelling, crafts, and more. Master Dance and Drum Classes, Vendors, & Concert Extravaganza with Balafon West African Dance Ensemble & other local artists performing. Come out and learn from talented artists including: Mama Kadiatou Conte, Fode Moussa Camara, Babacar N'Diaye, Assane M'Baye and Robin Gee. Web address: http://sites.google.com/site/unityncaac/     Please Contact: 919.423.5942 richardson.hazel@gmail.com for more information.



March 2009

African Solutions to African Problems
Friday, March 20, 2009, 12:30PM-1:30PM
1301 McGavran-Greenberg, Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC

Distinguished Economist at American University and President of the Free Africa Foundation, George Ayittey, PhD, will be speaking at the Gillings School of Global Public Health on UNC campus about African solutions to African problems. This event is co-sponsored by: The Office of Global Health, The Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases, and Africa Rising.   Free   Please Contact: Gretchen L. Van Vliet, MPH 919.843.7723 gretchen_vanvliet@unc.edu for more information.


Lost Boys from Sudan
Monday, March 23, 2009, 12:30 PM
Blue Cross Blue Shield Auditorium, Michael Hooker Research Center, UNC-CH

The Lost Boys of Sudan include more than 20,000 people who were displaced as children during a civil war that lasted in their country from 1983-2005. More than 4,000 came to the United States in 2001 with assistance from the International Rescue Committee and non-profits. Lost Boys Rebuilding Southern Sudan is an organization started by a group of Sudanese refugees and Nicole Fender, an HPM PhD student that stresses the importance of education in community living. LBRSS' ultimate purpose is to build schools in their homeland. The presentation at UNC will include a short video, a panel discussion featuring a group of Lost Boys and a question and answer session. They will also discuss their current efforts to raise money to build secondary schools in the Sudan. More Information     Please Contact: Swathi Sekar sswathi@email.unc.edu for more information.


GO! Global Orientation on Culture and Ethics
Saturday, March 28, 2009, 9 AM - 3 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, UNC-CH

Planning to go to Africa, Asia or Latin America to engage in service, service-learning or research and/or an internship program this summer or fall? Register now for GO! Global Orientation on culture and Ethics to learn about intercultural competency skills, country and culture specific issues and norms, and ethical implication for working in global communities. Registration deadline March 18, 2009. Visit http://www.unc.edu/go/ to learn more and register.   Free   Please Contact: Jenny Huq go@unc.edu for more information.



April 2009

Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes
Dr Leslie Witz

Thursday, April 2, 2009, 6:30PM-9:30PM
Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. This session's speaker is Dr Leslie Witz, from University of the Western Cape. He will be speaking on "A New Hippo for a New Nation: The Journey of a Natural History Museum ‘Across the Frontier’ in Post-Apartheid South Africa." Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.     Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Sounds of Globalism
Monday, April 13, 2009 - Saturday, April 18, 2009, See website for details
Fedex Global Education Center and Gerrard Hall

“Sounds of Globalism,” a free public world music festival, will be held at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. More Info Performers will include Malian griot and kora player Mamadou Diabate, American Indian singer and songwriter Pure Fé, Selkie (a Celtic band), salsa band Sajaso, oud player Naji Hilal, and the Japanese drumming group Triangle Taiko. UNC student groups performing will include the Arab Student Organization’s Dabkah Dance Team, Zankiliwa and artists playing Peruvian, Irish and other types of music. Each performance will also feature a discussion with an expert on art, music and/or dance in the region being represented and how these aspects of culture define a community’s identity and maintain its history. The festival will be hosted by the Office of New Student and Carolina Parent Programs, Carolina Student Arts Grant and Office of the Executive Director of the Arts, Mildred Brown Mayo Undergraduate Research Fund in Music, Diversity and Multicultural Affairs, Center for South Asia Studies, Center for Global Initiatives, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, Center for European Studies, Carolina Asia Center, and Study Abroad Office.   Free.   Please Contact: Meredith McCoy mlmccoy@email.unc.edu for more information.


Gender and Citizenship
Dr. Penda Mbow

Wednesday, April 15, 2009, 12:00 Noon.
Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This Lunchtime Lecture, sponsored by the Carolina Women's Center, will feature a talk by Dr. Penda Mbow, from the Department of History at Cheikh Anta Diop University in Senegal. She will present a talk on “Gender and Citizenship” as part of the Women's Center's Gender and Globalization Series.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Gender, Islam, and Health in Africa
Thursday, April 16, 2009 - Saturday, April 18, 2009, All day.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

The ASC will be hosting an interdisciplinary conference on “Gender, Islam, and Health in Africa.” Funded through Title VI and more than 10 departments, colleges, and centers at UNC, this conference will assemble scholars and activists from the U.S. and Africa to participate in panels that will explore four different venues of public engagement for African Muslim women: literature, health, law, and politics. Participants will consider how, through expressive culture and institutions of civil society as well as government, Muslim women in Africa challenge local and global structures of power in attempts to deepen democratic space and to lay the foundation for the emergence of just societies.

The keynote Address will be given by Fatou Sow, who has held faculty positions at University Paris Diderot and University Chiekh Anta Diop in Dakar, Senegal. She is currently a researcher at Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in Paris and heads the international coordination office of the Network of Women Living under Muslim Laws. Her talk will be on gender issues and the experience of African women under Muslim law. Other confirmed participants: LITERATURE: Ousseina Alidou (Rutgers Univ.), Sahar Amer (UNC-Chapel Hill), Beverly Mack (Kansas Univ.), Martine Antle (UNC-CH), Mary Wren Bivins (SUNY Oswego); HEALTH: Jennifer Yanco (WARA, Boston Univ.), Barbara Cooper (Rutgers Univ.), Ramatu Daroda (IPAS, NC/Niger), Zeinabou Hadari (Niger); LAW: Julius Nyang’oro (UNC-CH), Eunice Sahle (UNC-CH), Emily Burrill (UNC-CH), Tom Kelley (UNC-CH); POLITICS: Catharine Newbury (Smith College), Pearl Robinson (Tufts Univ.), Adeline Masquelier (Tulane Univ.), Penda Mbow (UCAD, Dakar); SCHOLARS AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT: Eunice Sahle, Reginald Hildebrand, Kia Caldwell, Perry Hall, and Judith Blau. More Information and Registration

Co-sponsors include: African Studies Center, Department of African and Afro-American Studies, College of Arts and Sciences, Center for Global Initiatives, Women’s Studies, Curriculum in International Studies, Asian Studies, Institute for African American Research, Odum Institute, Office of Diversity and Minority Affairs, Carolina Women’s Center, and West African Research Association.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Colonialisms Compared: Empires Across Space & Time
Saturday, April 25, 2009, 9:15 AM - 5:15 PM
Center for School Leadership Development, UNC-CH

In this seminar, four historians at UNC will compare colonialisms in four different regions: Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and the United States. Comparisons across time and space will allow us to consider larger trends over time, reveal resistance and adaptation, and the legacies of imperial rule. We’ll move chronologically, starting with the Iberian colonization of the Americas in the sixteenth century, then moving on to the American independence movement. We’ll then shift our focus to the Middle East, considering British and French rule there in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We’ll end our presentations with a consideration of the colonial roots of contemporary Africa. In the panel discussion at the end of the day, we’ll focus on patterns of colonialism over time. Please visit the Please visit Program Website for a detailed schedule and information on renewal credits for teachers.   $60 for teachers, $120 for others.   Please Contact: Caroline Dyar caroline_dyar@unc.edu for more information.



September 2009

Global Education Center Open House
Wednesday, September 2, 2009, 11 AM - 1:00 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Peacock Atrium, UNC-CH

UNC provides countless opportunities to explore other cultures and to become more globally aware! In fact, the FedEx Global Education Center houses many of the university's primary international units dedicated to global learning and services. Come learn what these departments have to offer. Plus, enjoy great food and coffee from countries all over the world!   Free.   Please Contact: Laura Griest lauragriest@unc.edu for more information.


Carolina for Kibera Interest Meeting
Wednesday, September 2, 2009, 6 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3024, UNC-CH

The Carolina for Kibera (CFK) student organization will be holding an interest meeting for students interesting in becoming involved with CFK this year. There will be FREE PIZZA so come on time to have the best selection! At the meeting, we'll be discussing upcoming projects and ways for YOU to get involved. If you are unable to attend that is okay, but please send an email to cfk@unc.edu to let us know you are still interested. A little about CFK: it is an international, non-governmental organization that has a strong foundation with the university and the Center for Global Initiatives. CFK fights abject poverty and helps prevent violence through *community-based development* in Kibera, the largest slum in East Africa. CFK was started by a UNC undergraduate, and it is in that spirit that we are building a student organization this year. Our goal is to gather a diverse group of students on campus, across all majors and interests, who are passionate about really doing something in their time here.     Please Contact: Anna Rodenbough anna.rodenbough@gmail.com for more information.


SUDAN Interest Meeting
Thursday, September 3, 2009, 7 PM
Campus Y, UNC-CH

Help plan events that focus on raising funds to give to humanitarian aid organizations. SUDAN funds last year were given to an organization called Silent Images, started by a fellow Tar Heel, David Johnson. All the money went to building wells in Darfur. Other activities include speaking at local schools, discussion forums about genocide related issues, and letter-writing campaigns.     Please Contact: Swathi Sekar swathi428@gmail.com for more information.


Orthodoxy and Deviance in Premodern Muslim Societies
Thursday, September 10, 2009, 6 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This talk is the opening session of this year's Andrew W. Mellon Sawyer Seminar, "Diversity and Conformity in Muslim Societies: Historical Coexistence and Contemporary Struggles. Professor Ahmed El Shamsy will present a paperentitled "Orthodoxy and Deviance in Premodern Muslim Societies",followed by a time for discussion. Ahmed El Shamsy has joined theHistory Department at UNC-Chapel Hill this fall. He completed his Ph.D.at Harvard University in History and Middle Eastern Studies, writingabout the origins and development of the Shafi'i school of law inninth-century Egypt. Dr. El Shamsy has received a certificate from AlAzhar in Islamic Law. El Shamsy's interests range widely through the history of Muslim societies. He has done research on sufi brotherhoods in the fourteenth century, on modern international relations, and on the ways that orthodoxies are understood today. Pre-registration Requested.     Please Contact: Sarah Vierra vierra@email.unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Navigators Training Session
Saturday, September 12, 2009, 1-4 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-CH

A program of the Center for Global Initiatives, Carolina Navigators enriches the education of both UNC and K-12 students through engaged international learning. Formerly known as the K-12 International Outreach Program, the program provides cultural resources and interactive classroom presentations by Carolina students who have international expertise. Carolina students benefit from the program by having the opportunity to share their experiences while practicing public speaking skills.     Please Contact: Tara Muller tara_muller@unc.edu for more information.


Go! Global Orientation on Culture and Ethics
Thursday, September 17, 2009,
State Dining Room, Morehead Planetarium and Science Center

Are you experiencing difficulty explaining your summer experience to friends? Do you feel you've only just begun the work you would like to do abroad? Want to hear about what other GO! students did this summer in Asia, Africa and Latin America? Join us for an evening of artistic reflection and discussion about a variety of service, service-learning, internship and research experiences this summer. After dinner, we'll engage in Open Space, a group format that generates communication, collaboration, innovation, and other solutions to re-entry challenges and transitions you may be facing. Environmental artist Bryant Holsenbeck will then facilitate a dynamic, hands-on documentation of your travels as a means of personal and group reflection. For more information please visit the Go! Website at http://www.unc.edu/go/     Please Contact: 962-0902 for more information.


Documentary Screening of "Pray the Devil Back to Hell"
Friday, September 18, 2009, 5:30PM-7:30PM
Tate-Turner Kuralt Auditorium, UNC-CH

"Pray the Devil Back to Hell" depicts the remarkable story of the courageous Liberian women who came together to end a bloody civil war and bring peace to their shattered country. Guest Speaker: Esteria Woods-White, founder and director of The Esteria Woods International Woods Foundation. Sponsored by the Department of Women's Studies.   Free of charge.   Please Contact: Joanne Hershfield hershfld@email.unc.edu for more information.



October 2009

Brown Bag Lunch with Sharon Schmickle
Wednesday, October 14, 2009, Noon
Global Education Center, Room 2010, UNC-CH

Sharon Schmickle is a Pulitzer prize winning journalist who, among other topics has written on agriculture in Africa, Malaria and HIV in Uganda, youth and discrimination in Egypt, and reconciliation in Liberia. Please visit Pulitzer Gateway or Pulitzer Center for more information on her work. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa.   Free. 11 attendees.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Panel Discussion: The Global Food Crisis
Thursday, October 15, 2009, 5:30 PM
Global Education Center Auditorium, UNC-CH

Discussion with three journalists from the Pulitzer Center. Panel topics include the wheat crisis in Kenya. Co-sponsored by CIBER. One of the panelists is Sharon Schmickle, who wrote this report on the Kenyan crisis.     Please Contact: Julia Kruse krusej@unc.edu for more information.



November 2009

Strategies and Perspectives of Migrants from Rural West Africa
Prof. Hans Hahn

Monday, November 23, 2009, 6:30-9:00 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Prof. Hans Hahn, of Frankfurt University in Germany will be speaking on the topic "Strategies and Perspectives of Migrants from Rural West Africa: Beyond the Rural/Urban Divide." This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free. 16 attendees.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



December 2009

Mossi Households in Burkina Faso
Prof. Colin West

Thursday, December 3, 2009, 4:00 PM
Wilson Hall, Room 128, UNC-CH

Prof. Colin West, in the Anthropology Department at UNC-Chapel Hill, will present a talk titled Domestic Processes and Global Change: Mossi Households in Burkina Faso. This seminar is sponsored by the Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology. Reception to follow, at Top of the Hill.   Free.   Please Contact: Colin West ctw@email.unc.edu for more information.


Constructing a Diaspora: The Gnawa Black West Africans in Morocco
Dr. Chouki El Hamel

Thursday, December 3, 2009, 6:30-9:00 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Prof. Chouki El Hamel, of Arizona State University, will present a talk on the Gnawa in Morocco. The Gnawa are a diasporic culture and one finds artistic and spiritual parallels between the Gnawa order and other spiritual black groups in Africa: the Stambouli in Tunisia, the Sambani in Libya, and the Bilali in Algeria. Outside Africa, one can also see a parallel as in the case of the Candomble in Salvador, Brazil, and the Vodoun religion practiced in Caribbean countries. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free. 12 attendees.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Andrew W. Mellon Sawyer Seminar
Friday, December 4, 2009 - Saturday, December 5, 2009,
FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-CH

The December session of the Andrew W. Mellon Sawyer Seminar on "Diversity and Conformity in Muslim Societies: Historical Coexistence and Contemporary Struggles" will take place in the Global Education Center. Through this workshop, we seek to broaden our understanding of how minorities—be they ethnic, racial, religious, sexual, or otherwise—have been positioned within Muslim societies and how Muslims have been positioned as minorities within non-Muslim, primarily European, societies. Dr. Chouki El Hamel will present a talk on race and slavery in North Africa. View Complete Program     Please Contact: Terry Meyer meyert@email.unc.edu for more information.



January 2010

Marriage is the Solution to What Plagues Us?:
Born-Again Youth, PEPFAR, and the Abstinence Movement in Uganda
Dr. Lydia Boyd

Friday, January 22, 2010, 12PM-1:30PM
Toy Lounge, Dey Hall 4th floor

Lydia Boyd received her M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology from New York University. Her dissertation, Saving One’s Self: Ugandan Youth, Sexual Abstinence and Born-Again Christianity, examined the promotion of sexual abstinence as an HIV/AIDS prevention strategy in Kampala, Uganda. Broadly, her research considers how medical discourses of health and disease intersect with contemporary and historical anxieties concerning sexual morality, marriage, kinship, and gender relations in Uganda.   Free.   Please Contact: Eunice Sahle eunice@email.unc.edu for more information.


The Legacy of Timbuktu
Saturday, January 23, 2010 - Friday, January 29, 2010,
Cameron Village Library, Raleigh, NC

The exhibit "The Legacy of Timbuktu: Wonders of the Written Word" will be offered at the Cameron Village Regional Library, and will include events and activities related to the exhibit, including teacher training, children's activities, and a panel discussion. Please see here for more information.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


The 'expert gara dyer' and the trailblazing educator:
gendered memory, identity and power in northwestern Sierra Leone
Dr. Sylvia Macauley

Monday, January 25, 2010, 12PM-1:30PM
Toy Lounge, Dey Hall 4th floor

Dr. Sylvia Macauley is currently an associate professor at Truman State University in Missouri where she teaches continental survey courses on Africa as well as regional and thematic seminars on issues such as women, resistance, ethnicity and nationalism in Africa. Her research interests focus on issues such as gender and education, gender and religion, the gendered impact of conflict in Africa as well as the need for a gendered approach to postconflict rebuilding.   Free   Please Contact: Eunice Sahle eunice@email.unc.edu for more information.


Caravans of Gold
Tuesday, January 26, 2010, 7:00-8:30 PM
Cameron Village Library, Raleigh, NC

Barbara Anderson will introduce a documentary on Timbuktu and Renaissance-era Africa, entitled "Caravans of Gold." This is part of a series of events based on the exhibit "The Legacy of Timbuktu" at the Cameron Village Library.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



February 2010

From Argument to Negotiation:
Constructing Democracy in African Muslim Contexts
Dr. Leo Villalon

Thursday, February 4, 2010, 12:00 Noon.
Law School Faculty Lounge, UNC-CH

Dr. Villalón is Director of the African Studies Center at the University of Florida and is also a faculty member in the Department of Political Science. Before coming to UF, he was an associate professor of political science at the University of Kansas and also directed the undergraduate major in international studies. As a Fulbright professor and visiting professor, Dr. Villalón has taught at two universities in Senegal and also has lectured at other institutions in a number of countries in West Africa. His research focuses on the politics of the former French colonies of West Africa, especially the Sahelian countries of Senegal, Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso. His work also has concentrated on the role of Islam in politics and on the processes of democratization   Free.   Please Contact: Tom Kelley takelley@email.unc.edu for more information.


Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar: Nationalists and Salafis
Friday, February 5, 2010 - Saturday, February 6, 2010, All Day
UNC Fedex Global Education Center, 4th floor

This Sawyer Seminar series, entitled “Diversity and Conformity in Muslim Societies: Historical Coexistence and Contemporary Struggles,” seeks to explore the tension between the legacy of diversity bequeathed by remarkably tolerant Muslim histories, on one hand, and the efforts of post-colonial nation-states, internal activists, and international interventions to impose conformity and uniformity within contemporary Muslim societies, on the other. In particular, it will focus on nationalism and Salafism as means of imposing homogeneity; spatial and cultural interactions between Muslims and non-Muslims; and the relationship between dominant groups and minorities in Muslim societies. Co-chaired by Sarah Shields, Department of History, UNC Chapel Hill and Banu Gokariksel, Department of Geography, UNC Chapel Hill. For a detailed schedule and list of participants please visit the Sawyer Seminar home page .     Please Contact: Sarah Shields (919)962-8078 sshields@email.unc.edu for more information.



March 2010

Techno War: The Scramble for the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s Minerals
Tuesday, March 30, 2010, 7 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center Auditorium, UNC-CH

Advocates for Human Rights is proud to host John Prendergast as this year's keynote lecturer for Human Rights Week. John Prendergast is a noted human rights activist and author. Mr. Prendergast has spent his career educating his peers about genocide and mass atrocity. He has worked tirelessly to bring attention to the conflicts in Darfur and Northern Uganda, and raise awareness about violence against women and girls in the Congo. Mr. Prendergast's lecture will address "conflict minerals" in the Congo. Part of Human Rights Week at UNC.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



April 2010

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in West Africa:
The case of Ghana
John Hanson

Thursday, April 1, 2010, 6-8:00 PM
Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

John Hanson (Indiana University, National Humanities Center) will be leading the next Sawyer Seminar. "The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in West Africa: the case of Ghana." Dinner included! Please RSVP to vierra@email.unc.edu so we can get a count and send the paper to you.   Free.   Please Contact: Sarah Vierra vierra@email.unc.edu for more information.


Leaving Dakar: Place and Privilege in Sembene’s Black Girl
Wednesday, April 14, 2010, 5:30 pm
Hanes Art Center 121

Dr. Steven Nelson, Associate Professor at University of California, Los Angeles, will present a lecture. This discussion of Senegalese director Ousmane Sembene’s 1965 film Black Girl explores the intersection of film and urban space as a means to explore how Dakar registers as an important point of departure and, as importantly, a complex set of memories for both colonizer and colonized in the aftermath of Senegalese independence. Part of a larger project, entitled Dakar: The Making of an African Metropolis, this presentation seeks to understand how Sembene uses Dakar to explore the tenuous nature of the Senegalese state and intercultural relationships in the 1960s.   Free   Please Contact: Carol Magee 919-962-0727 cmagee@email.unc.edu for more information.


GO! Global Orientation on Culture and Ethics
Saturday, April 17, 2010, 10 AM - 3 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Peacock Atrium, UNC-CH

Planning to go to Africa, Asia or Latin America to engage in service, service-learning or research and/or an internship program this summer or fall? Register now for GO! Global Orientation on culture and Ethics to learn about intercultural competency skills, country and culture specific issues and norms, and ethical implication for working in global communities. Registration deadline April 12, 2010. Visit http://www.unc.edu/go/ to learn more and register.   Free.   Please Contact: Lori Rezzouk lori_rezzouk@unc.edu for more information.


SERSAS/SEAN Conference
Friday, April 23, 2010 - Saturday, April 24, 2010, All Day
FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-CH

The South Eastern Regional Seminar on African Studies (SERSAS) and the Southeast Africanist Network will hold a conference themed "Faith, Art, and the Politics of Belonging in Africa." The call for papers is open in terms of topics and methodologies to any aspect and region of Africa. SERSAS/SEAN invites the participation of advanced undergraduate and graduate students in addition to faculty. The final deadline for submissions is February, 15, 2010. More Info     Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Sacred Spaces, Sacred Sounds
Diversity and Conformity in Muslim Societies

Friday, April 23, 2010 - Saturday, April 24, 2010, All day.
Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Part of the 2009-10 Mellon Sawyer Seminar entitled Diversity and Conformity in Muslim Societies: Historical Coexistence and Contemporary Struggles. Funded by the Mellon Foundation, all of the Sawyer Seminar's meetings and the conferences are free and open to the public. We welcome the participation of the academic community. For complete information on this Mellon Sawyer Seminar, please visit the Seminar Website.   Free.   Please Contact: Sarah Shields sshields@email.unc.edu for more information.



August 2010

Black Theodicy Forum
Friday, August 6, 2010 - Saturday, August 7, 2010, Friday 5 PM, Saturday 8 AM - 5 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-CH

Black Theodicy Forum: What do Christianity and Islam have to say about Black American group suffering? Forum will involve Muslim and Christian scholars in discussion of issues.   Free.   Please Contact: Tomeiko Carter tashford@email.unc.edu for more information.


Esse Quam Videri: Muslim Self Portraits
Tuesday, August 24, 2010 - Thursday, September 9, 2010, All day.
FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-CH

In this exhibit, community based artist Todd Drake has worked with Muslims in North Carolina to create self-portraits that share real, rather than seeming, reflections of self to a wider audience. More Info   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Fulbright Information Session
Tuesday, August 31, 2010, 11 AM - 12:00 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Information on the Fulbright program and application process can be found at http://cgi.unc.edu/funding/fulbright/.   Free.   Please Contact: Tripp Tuttle tripp@unc.edu for more information.



September 2010

Global Education Center Open House
Wednesday, September 1, 2010, 11 AM - 1 PM, Plus FLAS info session 10 AM
Fedex Global Education Center, UNC-CH

UNC provides countless opportunities to explore other cultures and to become more globally aware! In fact, the FedEx Global Education Center houses many of the university's primary international units dedicated to global learning and services. Come learn what these departments have to offer. Plus, enjoy great food and coffee from countries all over the world! Take advantage of information sessions regarding funding and program opportunities. Each session takes place in Conference Room 4003 of the FedEx Global Education Center. 10:00 AM FLAS; 11:00 AM Fulbright US Student Program; 11:30 AM Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship; 12:00 PM Carolina Navigators; 2:00 PM Languages Across the Curriculum & Euro Major; 2:20 PM TransAtlantic Masters Program.   Free.   Please Contact: Laura Griest lauragriest@unc.edu for more information.


A Conversation with Wole Soyinka
Friday, September 10, 2010, 7:30 PM
National Humanities Center, 7 T.W. Alexander Drive, RTP

The Nobel Laureate for Literature in 1986, Wole Soyinka, has published more than thirty works, and remains active in various international cultural and human rights organizations. Born and educated in Nigeria, Wole Soyinka continued his studies at the University of Leeds, England, then joined the Royal Court Theatre, London as a play-reader. In 1960, he returned to Nigeria, where he founded two theatre companies—"The 1960 Masks," and the "Orisun Theatre." Soyinka writes in various genres—from the light comedy of cultures in The Lion and the Jewel, through King Baabu, a savagely satiric adaptation of Alfred Jarry’s Ubu Roi, to the dense poetic tragedy of Death and the King’s Horseman. Lectures and exhibits at the National Humanities Center are free and open to the public. They are supported by the North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Educational and Cultural Outreach Endowment Fund. To reserve space for this event please contact Martha Johnson.   Free.   Please Contact: Martha Johnson (919) 549-0661, ext. 110 mjohnson@nationalhumanitiescenter.org for more information.


Go! Reflection
Thursday, September 16, 2010, 5:30 PM
Queen Anne Lounge, Campus Y, UNC-CH

An interactive workshop for folks returning from service, service-learning, and research experiences in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Visit http://www.unc.edu/go/ for more info and to register.   Free   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall 962-1522 sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Hearing is Healing: The Intersection of Music and Public Health
Peter Mawanga

Tuesday, September 21, 2010, 5:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

Discover the power of music to change the world in this lecture and performance by Malawian musician Peter Mawanga. Blending traditional African, jazz, and Caribbean rhythms with modern instrumentation, Peter's music has an international flavor that is nevertheless rooted in the music of his native Malawi. Peter is currently collaborating with UNC alumnus Andrew Magill on a music project which shares the stories of those infected and affected by AIDS in Malawi. Hear Peter speak about this project and his work mentoring Malawian orphans and street children through music. Also enjoy a video presentation about Peter’s work. Reception following.   Free.   Please Contact: Laura Griest lauragriest@unc.edu for more information.


Islamic-based Strategies for Female Empowerment in Niger
Dr. Zeinabou Hadari

Wednesday, September 22, 2010, 6:30-9:00 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Dr. Zeinabou Hadari, Niger Office of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria will give a talk as part of the Carolina Seminar on African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



October 2010

Carolina Seminar
Margaret C. Lee

Thursday, October 28, 2010, 6:30-9:00 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3024, UNC-CH

Prof. Margaret C. Lee will present a talk titled: "From Chocolate City in China to the Markets in East Africa: The Dynamics of Africa-China Trade Relations." This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



November 2010

Environmental Rights, Peace and Grassroots Movements: Africa and Beyond
Tuesday, November 9, 2010, 5:30-7 PM
Fedex Global Education Center Auditorium, UNC-CH

Hear from a panel discussion titled “Environmental Rights, Peace and Grassroots Movements: Africa and Beyond” following the screening of the award winning documentary “Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai.” A winner at the Full Frame Documentary Festival in Durham and “Best Documentary” at Asheville Film Festival 2008, “Taking Root” tells the story of Maathai, whose simple act of planting trees grew into the world wide Green Belt Movement to safeguard the environment, protect human rights, and defend democracy. Maathai was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004 for her work. The panel features Kamoji Wachiira, a leading botanist, and UNC Professors Bereket Selassie, Arturo Escobar, and Mark Driscoll. Professor Eunice Sahle will moderate the panel discussion.   Free.   Please Contact: Laura Griest lauragriest@unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar
Dr. Ousmane Sene, University of Cheikh Anta Diop
Layers of Meaning in ‘La petite vendeuse de soleil’

Monday, November 15, 2010, 6:30-9:00 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3024, UNC-CH

Dr. Sene will show this 1999 Senegalese film about a young handicapped girl trying to earn her living as she keeps confidence in herself despite her physical disadvantages, a parable of international development. The 45-minute film by Djibril Diop Mambety (in Wolof with English subtitles) will be followed by a discussion which will explore multiple layers of meaning, examine its artistic qualities, and also comment on the various cultural dimensions of the work. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


South African Apartheid
Prof. David Bunn

Thursday, November 18, 2010, 6 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center Auditorium, UNC-CH

Dr. Margaret Lee will introduce South African professor David Bunn. He will speak on apartheid in order to educate students on international issues of discrimination, political struggle, and human rights. His story will illustrate the sacrifice required to reject white privilege, defy military command, and participate in the anti-apartheid movement. Dr. David Bunn was the on the Executive of the National Arts Council of the post-apartheid South African government and head of its Research Committee. He also was the Inaugural Head of the Combined School of Arts at the University of Witwatersrand. During apartheid he actively rebelled against the government, and had affiliations to several anti-apartheid organizations linked to the banned African National Congress. Daily life brought him into contact with renowned figures such as Zackie Achmat, Steve Biko and Edwin Cameron. Currently, he teaches literature, philosophy, and South African history at the University of Chicago, and the University of Johannesburg. He is the director of the University of Chicago program in South Africa and he also lectures for Northwestern, and Duke.   Free.   Please Contact: Evan Tasios evant@email.unc.edu for more information.


Beyond Peace Deals
A Discussion with Pulitzer Center Journalist Jina Moore

Monday, November 29, 2010, 5:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Confront the issues at the core of violence in central Africa with award-winning Pulitzer Center journalist Jina Moore. Combining rich narratives with an acute grasp of political and historical context, Jina’s articles embrace the real human stories that emerge from the complex political environments of the region.Moore is currently a Fulbright Fellowship recipient, reporting on the UN’s peace-building efforts in Africa. She is a correspondent for The Christian Science Monitor and has been anthologized in Best American Science Writing. Discover in this discussion how peace-building has progressed in central Africa, and what possibilities exist in the region for citizens to build a better future.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



February 2011

Interdisciplinary Series on Sustainability and Innovation in Global Contexts presents:
International Job Creation:
Can We (Micro) Franchise Our Way Out of Poverty?

Thursday, February 3, 2011, 5:30-6:45PM
Nelson Mandela Auditorium
Fedex Global Education Center
UNC-Chapel Hill

Prominent microfranchising pioneers and experts will discuss real examples from around the world and, ultimately, help the audience to navigate issues related to microfranchising as a business model adaptation for poverty alleviation. Public reception in Atrium to follow. Please RSVP to ciber@unc.edu.   Free   Please Contact: Julia Kruse (919) 962-7843 ciber@unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar
Dr. Soyini Madison
Corporate Rituals and Staging 'Water Rites'

Thursday, February 10, 2011, 6:30-9:00 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Dr. Soyini Madison of Northwestern University will speak on Corporate Rituals and Staging 'Water Rites'. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Representing Race: the Queen of Sheba's fate in the Middle Ages
Tuesday, February 15, 2011, 5-7 PM
Toy Lounge, Dey Hall, UNC-CH

Dr. Lynn Ramey, Associate Professor of French at Vanderbilt University, will present a lecture entitled "Representing Race: the Queen of Sheba's fate in the Middle Ages." In her lecture, Dr. Ramey will reflect upon the ways in which color difference was understood, questioned, manipulated, and/or erased in medieval French literature. She will discuss the medieval association of race with skin color and the ways in which the Queen of Sheba was represented in both literature and art as black because of her association with the East. As she presents and analyzes different portraits of Sheba, both verbal and pictorial, Dr. Ramey will offer some conclusions about the ways in which a black woman was perceived in the medieval West.   Free.   Please Contact: Sahar Amer 962-0112 samer@email.unc.edu for more information.



March 2011

Carolina Seminar
Dr. Nuhu Yaqub
Values Education and Governance in Nigeria: How Would the Country Get the Right Balance?

Thursday, March 3, 2011, 6:30-9:00 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3024, UNC-CH

Dr. Nuhu Yaqub, Fulbright Scholar in Residence at Wake Forest University will address values education and governance in Nigeria. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Living Kibera
Opening Reception

Thursday, March 17, 2011, 6:00-8:00PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Atrium, UNC-CH

Living Kibera brings the community of Kibera, a slum on the outskirts of Nairobi, Kenya, to life on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill. The opening reception includes interactive activities for adults and children to immerse themselves in the vibrant culture of Kibera. The exhibit, running until July 15, features art created exclusively by Kiberans in a variety of mediums including photography, drawings, poetry, paintings, textiles, hand-made objects, and video. The goal of Living Kibera is to open a dialogue around perceptions, misconceptions, and realities of life in dense urban communities. The themes of work, play, home, dream, and self explore the different facets of life in Kibera through the perspectives of people living there today.
Living Kibera is co-sponsored by the African Studies Center, Center for Global Initiatives, Department of Women’s Studies, Curriculum in Global Studies, Department of Art, and Carolina for Kibera.
To view the event website please visit UNC Global.   Free.   Please Contact: Maggie McDowell magsmcd@gmail.com for more information.


Curriculum in Global Studies presents
A Public Lecture with Helene Cooper

Tuesday, March 22, 2011, 5:30PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

Helene Cooper is a globally renowned journalist and the author of the acclaimed memoir "The House at Sugar Beach". She has reported from war-torn regions across the globe for The Wall Street Journal and now writes for the New York Times as their White House correspondent in Washington, D.C.
Known for her rigorous investigation and insightful reporting, Cooper has received significant praise for her work. She employed these talents in the research and writing of her two books: an edited collection of the work of her colleague Daniel Pearl, who was murdered by the Taliban in 2002, and the New York Times bestselling memoir "The House at Sugar Beach", which traces her trajectory from a privileged child to a refugee to an American journalist while examining the violence and stratification that troubles her homeland Liberia.   Free.   Please Contact: Lara Markstein laram@email.unc.edu for more information.


Peace Corps Interest Session
Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 6:30pm-7:30pm
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 1005, UNC-CH

Representatives will be on hand to answer questions about the Peace Corps program and application process.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Spring African Diaspora Lecture
Her Excellency Amina Salum Ali
African Union Ambassador to the United States

Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 7:00-9:00PM
The Sonja Haynes Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

The ambassador to the United States for the African Union, which includes Egypt and Libya, will speak on March 23 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Amina Salum Ali is expected to discuss recent and current events in those countries, two of the union’s 23 member states, as well as decisions at the recent 16th AU Summit held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Ali will take questions from the audience after her talk.
Hosted by The Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, at 150 South Road.
For more information please visit The African Union website.   Free.   Please Contact: Joseph Jordan jfjordan@email.unc.edu for more information.


Steve Radelet
Emerging Africa: How 17 Countries are Leading the Way

Thursday, March 24, 2011, 1 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Steve Radelet, Chief Economist at USAID, and former Senior Advisor on Development to Secretary Clinton, will be giving a talk based on his book, Emerging Africa: How 17 Countries are Leading the Way. He will also be discussing development career opportunities and new directions at USAID.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall 962-1522 sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Gendered Citizenships
Thursday, March 24, 2011, 4:30PM-6:30PM
Fedex Global Education Center, DeBerry Board Room 3009, UNC-CH

Presentation by Kathleen Coll and Kia Caldwell on the book, Gendered Citizenships.   Free.   Please Contact: Kia Caldwell klcaldwe@email.unc.edu for more information.


John Ondeche to visit UNC as Social Entrepreneur in Residence
Sunday, March 27, 2011 - Friday, April 1, 2011,
See schedule for locations

Carolina for Amani will bring John Ondeche to Chapel Hill to serve as a guest lecturer and visiting Social Entrepreneur in Residence from March 27th-April 1st. Mr. Ondeche is the director of the New Life Home - Kisumu and serves as a member of the Kenyan National Adoption Board. Mr. Ondeche will speak in a number of settings on a range of topics including children abandoned by AIDS and poverty in Africa, Kenyan domestic and international adoptions and the culture of adoption in Kenya, the link between non-profit governance and entrepreneurship, and the work of New Life Homes. Please see Carolina for Amani for a his full schedule of Mr. Ondeche's engagements at UNC.   Free.   Please Contact: Morgan Abbott morganpabbott@gmail.com for more information.


Carolina Seminar
Dr. Firoze Manji
Media and Social Struggle in Contemporary Africa

Thursday, March 31, 2011, 6:30-9:00 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3024, UNC-CH

Dr. Firoze Manji, of the Pambazuka News, will speak on media and social struggle in contemporary Africa. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing new research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Voices Against Violence: Omekongo Dibinga and STAND
Thursday, March 31, 2011, 7:00PM
Frank Porter Graham Student Union, Auditorium, UNC-CH

Join STAND, a student anti-genocide coalition for a spoken word performance and captivating lecture by Omekongo Dibinga on Thursday, March 31st, 2011. As an award-winning Congolese-American poet, activist, musician and author, Omekongo is traveling across the country and inspiring audiences to take a stand against violence and mass atrocities. He has appeared alongside Norah Jones, OutKast, Wyclef Jean and Angelina Jolie in his advocacy work regarding violence in Central Africa, particularly in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Omekongo will discuss topics ranging from conflict mineral extraction and trade to gender-based violence and the implications of Western involvement.
Tickets will be sold for two dollars in the Pit and the Union box office the week of the event, as well as at the event.   $2.00.   Please Contact: Cara Peterson cmpeters@email.unc.edu for more information.



April 2011

African Social Movements in a Globalizing Context
Friday, April 1, 2011, 5:30-7:30PM
Sonja Haynes Stone Center, Hithcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

A round table discussion introduced and moderated by Prof. Eunice Sahle of the Departments of African and African American Studies and Global Studies at UNC-CH. Participants include Professors Bereket Selassie and Georges Nzongola, and graduate students Elena Yehia and Yusuf Al-Bulushi of UNC-CH, Prof. Charles Piot of Duke University, and Dr. Firoze Manji and Molly Kane of the Pambuzuka News. This event is presented jointly by the African Studies Center, the Department of Geography, and the Department of African and African American Studies.   Free.   Please Contact: Eunice Sahle eunice@email.unc.edu for more information.


From Prisons to Polars, Justice and Humans Rights in Moroccan Cinema
A lecture by Valerie Orlando

Thursday, April 7, 2011, 4:00PM
Dey Hall, Toy Lounge, UNC-CH

Valérie Orlando is Professor of French & Francophone Literature. She is the author of four books: Nomadic Voices of Exile: Feminine Identity in Francophone Literature of the Maghreb, (Ohio University Press, 1999), Of Suffocated Hearts and Tortured Souls: Seeking Subjecthood Through Madness in Francophone Women’s Writing of Africa and the Caribbean (Lexington Books, 2003), Francophone Voices of the ‘New Morocco’ in Film and Print: (Re)presenting a Society in Transition (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2009) and Screening Morocco: Filmic Depictions of a Changing Society (forthcoming, Ohio UP, 2011). She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on Francophone women’s writing from the African diaspora, African Cinema, and French literature and culture. For more on Dr. Orlando please visit Valeriekeyorlando.org. This event is co-sponsored by the Department of Romance Language, the African Studies Center, and the department of Asian Studies.   Free.   Please Contact: Dominique Fisher domfisc@email.unc.edu for more information.


Open Access, Open Systems: Pastoral management of common-pool resources in the Chad Basin.
Dr. Mark Mortiz

Thursday, April 14, 2011, 4:00PM
Wilson Library, Room 128, UNC-CH

Dr. Mortiz of the Department of Anthropology, The Ohio State University, will speak on his interdisciplinary study of complex social-ecological systems that examines how mobile pastoralists in the Logone floodplain in the Far North Province of Cameroon coordinate their movements to avoid conflict and overgrazing in a land tenure system that is commonly described as open access. This event is co-sponsored by UNC's African Studies Center and the Department of Anthropology.   Free.   Please Contact: Colin West ctw@email.unc.edu for more information.


GO! Global Orientation on Culture and Ethics
Saturday, April 16, 2011, 10 AM - 3 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, UNC-CH

Are you doing service, service-learning, research or an internship in Africa? Go! is is a pre-departure training to help you evaluate expectations, anticipate cultural and ethical challenges, prepare for engagement in communities, and develop intercultural competencies. Visit http://cgi.unc.edu/go for more info.   Free.   Please Contact: CGI GO! go@unc.edu for more information.


7th Annual Auction for Education
Hosted by Students for Students International

Sunday, April 17, 2011, 4:00PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Atrium, UNC-CH

The mission of S4Si is to create educational opportunities for high-achieving students in the developing world, with the belief that education is essential to community leadership and a country’s development. They are a university-based, nonprofit organization that provides these opportunities through collaboration with the local communities of Scholars. S4Si is proud to welcome keynote speaker Lydia Wilbard. Lydia spoke at the 2005 World Summit at the United Nations about the importance of girls’ education and her own struggle to complete school against daunting odds in Tanzania. Dinner will be served by Durham’s Palace International. Cocktail attire suggested. For more information and to order tickets please visit S4Si.   Adults: $35, Students: $15 pre-order, $17 at-door.   Please Contact: Devika Chawla auction@s4siunc.org for more information.



September 2011

UNC School of Medicine
Friday Infectious Disease Conference

Friday, September 9, 2011, 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM
1131 Bioinformatics Building, UNC-CH

The 2011-2012 conference series kicks off with two back-to-back speakers: ​"The Constitution and HIV/AIDS: The Personal and the Political" Edwin Cameron -- Justice, Constitutional Court of South Africa (8:30 - 9:30 a.m.) Edwin Cameron is a noted human rights activist and a sitting justice on South Africa’s Constitutional Court. During apartheid, he was a leading human rights lawyer. This talk is followed by: "Laboratory Medicine Can Have Tsunamis, Too: The Case for Simple/rapid HIV RNA Testing" Robert Coombs, MD, PhD, FRCPC - Professor of Laboratory Medicine - University of Washington (9:30 - 10:30 a.m.) The focus of Dr. Coombs' research activity is on the pathogenesis of HIV-1 and the quantification of viral load in the setting of therapeutic clinical trials involving both adult and pediatric HIV-1 infected subjects.   Free   Please Contact: Lisa Chensvold lisa_chensvold@med.unc.edu for more information.


Global Information Fair
Thursday, September 15, 2011, 11 AM - 1 PM
The Pit, UNC-CH

Please stop by to talk with us and find out about upcoming activities and scholarships available for students. All the UNC Area Studies Centers will have information, as well as food and drinks from their world areas available to sample. (100 attendees)   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


African Diaspora Lecture and Screening
Zina Saro-Wiwa

Tuesday, September 20, 2011, 7 PM
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

The Stone Center’s Fall 2011 African Diaspora Lecture will be delivered by Nigerian-born multi-media, multi-genre artist Zina Saro-Wiwa. Saro-Wiwa is a groundbreaking experimental and conceptual artist whose work challenges conventional views of the continent. This Is My Africa is an award-winning documentary film directed and produced by ZinaSaro-Wiwa and it will be shown during the talk. This Is My Africa is a sensitive, nuanced and elegaic meditation on the meanings that people attach to the continent. (73 attendees)   Free.   Please Contact: The Stone Center (919) 962-9001 for more information.


Carolina Seminar
Dr. Bereket Selassie
The Broken Promise: Eritrea's Post-Independence Road to Autocracy

Thursday, September 22, 2011, 6:30-9 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Dr. Bereket Selassie, of the African and Afro-American Studies Department at UNC-Chapel Hill, will present a talk based on his new book Wounded Nation: How a Once Promising Eritrea Was Betrayed and Its Future Compromised. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is c omprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. (25 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Amelia DeFosset damelia@email.unc.edu for more information.



October 2011

Southeast African Languages and Literature Forum
Saturday, October 1, 2011 - Sunday, October 2, 2011, All day Saturday, 1/2 day Sunday
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center will host the second annual Southeast African Languages and Literature Forum (SEALLF). The forum aims to promote the study, teaching, examination and overall development of African languages. SEALLF provides a platform for strengthening the teaching of African languages and literature in the Southeastern region of the United States. More Information (17 attendees)   $30   Please Contact: Amelia DeFosset damelia@email.unc.edu for more information.


Fragile States, Global Consequences
Tuesday, October 4, 2011, 5:30-7:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, UNC-CH

This discussion will examine the global challenge of fragile states, focusing on Democratic Republic of the Congo, Bosnia, East Timor, and Haiti. It aims to encourage discussion of comprehensive ways to promote stronger nations. More Info   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Frantz Fanon: His Life, His Struggle, His Work
Tuesday, October 4, 2011, 7 PM
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

Frantz Fanon, a Martinique-born psychiatrist, theorist and activist, became an unlikely spokesperson for the Algerian revolution against French colonialism in the 1950s. Fifty years after his death, this documentary reveals the short and intense life of one of the great thinkers of the 20th century. Dir: Cheikh Djemaï/ Martinique, France, Algeria, Tunisia /French and Arabic w/English Sub-titles/52 min./2004 Frantz Fanon is screened as part of the Fanon Symposium Program. (100 attendees)   Free.   Please Contact: The Stone Center (919) 962-9001 for more information.


The Fanon Symposium:
Remembering the Life and Work of Frantz Fanon

Tuesday, October 4, 2011 - Friday, October 7, 2011, Varied times.
Stone Center, UNC-CH

The Stone Center will host a special commemoration marking the 50th year anniversary of the death of cultural and political icon Frantz Fanon. The commemoration includes a film screening and a special symposium with presentations by guest panelists. The keynote address will be given by Mireille Fanon Mendés-France, President of the Frantz Fanon Foundation in Paris. October 4, at 7pm: "Frantz Fanon: His Life, His Struggle, His Work" Film Screening; October 6 at 7pm: Keynote Presentation by Mireille Fanon Mendés-France, response by Linda Carty, Associate Professor of African American Studies, Syracuse University; October 7, 9am-4pm: Panel Discussions. More Info and Registration   Free.   Please Contact: The Stone Center fanonrsvp@unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar
Decentralization and Devolution in Africa: Lessons from South Africa
Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi

Thursday, October 13, 2011, 6:30-9 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Dr. Fraser-Moleketi is a South African politician currently serving as the United Nations Development Programme's Democratic Governance Director. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. This working group is comprised of Triangle area faculty and graduate students. Each month's meeting is an informal gathering for sharing research and discussing contemporary issues in Africa. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. (20 attendees)   Free.   Please Contact: Amelia DeFosset damelia@email.unc.edu for more information.


Sufi Oral Narratives and the Practice of Islam in Senegal
Prof. Mamarame Seck

Tuesday, October 18, 2011, 3:30 PM
Hyde Hall, Incubator Room (2nd Floor) , UNC-CH

This presentation explores the unstudied rich Wolof Sufi oral cultural productions and their contribution to the knowledge about Islam in Senegal, focusing on oral production by Sufi leaders and their followers. This tradition consists of an oral corpus of the life stories of past and current Sufi leaders, woven by multiple (re) tellers across generations, designed in such a way that they can give Sufi adepts examples to follow and, possibly, reproduce. Dr. Mamarame Seck is a native Wolof speaker from Senegal. His research interests include African language pedagogy, Wolof language and linguistics, Wolof Sufi discourse and Islam in Senegal. (23 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


K-12 Global Education Symposium
Wednesday, October 19, 2011 - Thursday, October 20, 2011, All Day.
The Friday Center for Continuing Education, UNC-CH

World View’s 2011 K-12 Global Education Symposium explores the ten years post September 11 and how this significant 21st century event has shaped global perspectives in geopolitics, East-West relations, and educational discourse. We will also look at the nature and causes of international conflict, human rights, peace resolutions, and more. This symposium offers general sessions, concurrent sessions, and support for school-based teams in creating an Action Plan for globalizing schools and school systems. Information and Registration (383 attendees)     Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Death and Displacement in Sudan:
Evidence of Continuing State-Led Genocide
Dr. John Hagan

Tuesday, October 25, 2011, Talk, 6 PM; Reception, 7 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, UNC-CH

Dr. John Hagan is the John D. MacArthur Professor at Northwestern University, and Co-Director of the Center on Law & Globalization, which is a partnership between the American Bar Foundation and the University of Illinois College of Law. His talk, "Death and Displacement in Sudan: Evidence of Continuing State-Led Genocide" will be followed by the opening reception of the exhibit, "Toward Greater Awareness: Darfur and American Activism, Sculptural Exhibition of Works by Mitch Lewis." (75 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Laura Griest lauragriest@unc.edu for more information.



November 2011

These Are Our Children
Thursday, November 3, 2011, 7:00-8:30 pm
Tate-Turner-Kuralt Auditorium

These Are Our Children is a one-hour documentary film directed by Joanne Hershfield that reveals how the devastating effects of poverty, HIV/AIDs, and violence on Kenyan children are successfully being reduced through local grassroots interventions. This event is sponsored by the Department of Women's Studies, the African Studies Center,and the Sonja Haynes Stone Center. (70 attendees).   Free   Please Contact: Joanne Hershfield 919-260-1835 joannehershfield@bellsouth.net for more information.


The Ethics and Politics of Famine Relief:
The Horn of Africa Experience
Prof. Bereket Selassie

Tuesday, November 8, 2011, 3:30-4:30 PM
Hyde Hall, Incubator Room (2nd Floor), UNC-CH

Dr. Bereket Selassie is William E. Leuchtenburg Professor of African Studies, and Professor of Law, at UNC-CH. For over thirty years, his research interest has focused on African history, law and politics. This talk is part of the African and Afro-American Studies Faculty Colloquium Series. (25 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Travis Gore stgore@email.unc.edu for more information.


War Stories: A Semester-long Speaker Series
Alexandra Fuller

Tuesday, November 8, 2011, 5:30PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

The final speaker of the fall semester series, bestselling author Alexandra Fuller, will discuss growing up in war-torn central Africa. Alexandra Fuller is the bestselling author of Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight (Random, 2003), Scribbling the Cat (Penguin, 2005) and four books of non-fiction. Born in England and raised in Africa, Fuller grew up in Rhodesia during the destructive civil war of the 1970s. She has published numerous articles on the history and politics of conflict in Zimbabwe. Her most recent book Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness (Penguin, 2011) captures the passions that embody living in Africa.   Free.   Please Contact: Lara Markstein laram@email.unc.edu for more information.


Making Good Americans in Africa
Travel, Celebrity and the Costs of Humanitarianism
A Talk with Kathryn Mathers

Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 7:00PM
FedEx Global Education Center, 3024, UNC-CH

When Americans tell stories about travel to Africa, the continent and Africans are often reduced to backdrops to an American journey of self-discovery. This produces the peculiar humanitarianism of Americans in Africa that is increasingly framed by celebrity travel stories and by the ability of everyday Americans to consume in order to do good. Dr. Kathryn Mathers is a visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University. Her recent book, Travel, Humanitarianism, and Becoming American in Africa uses observations of American travelers to southern Africa to ask: why is Africa so important to Americans? Her work continues to explore the ways that identities – individual, corporate, political – are formed and shaped through cross-cultural encounters. This discussion is hosted by UNC Global and the African Studies Center in conjunction with the art exhibition Towards Greater Awareness: Darfur and American Activism on display in the FedEx Global Education Center October 20, 2011 through December 17, 2011. (110 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Laura Griest lauragriest@unc.edu for more information.


Peace and Conflict: Ten Years after 9-11
Wednesday, November 9, 2011 - Thursday, November 10, 2011, All day Saturday, 1/2 day Sunday
The Friday Center for Continuing Education, UNC-CH

The World View Community College Symposium explores the ten years post September 11. We will also look at the nature and causes of international conflict, human rights, peace resolutions, and more. This symposium offers general sessions, concurrent sessions, and support for college-based teams in creating a global college Action Plan. A new type of concurrent session focusing on internationalizing courses will be offered at this symposium. In these sessions instructors will examine key issues in peace and conflict from different world regions and plan modules to integrate these issues into their courses. Information and Registration (94 attendees).   $175 per NC educator, $275 per out-of-state   Please Contact: World View 919-962-9264 for more information.


The Program in the Humanities and Social Values presents:
The Islamic Cultures of Africa

Friday, November 11, 2011 - Saturday, November 12, 2011, 4:30 p.m. Fri. through 1:00 p.m. Sat.
Location provided upon registration

This seminar will take participants to the four corners of Africa to review the impact and significance of Islam on the continent. Topics include: "Mosques and Society in Early Islamic Iberia and North Africa" (Glaire Anderson, UNC Assistant Professor of Art History); "Women and Islam in West Africa" (Emily Burrill, UNC Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies); "Islam and Christianity in the Horn of Africa: A Millennium of Co-existence" (Bereket Selassie, UNC Professor of African and Afro-American Studies and Law) and other topics. 10 contact hours for 1 unit of renewal credit. More Information and Registration (72 attendees).   Tuition is $125. Tuition for teachers is $62.50.   Please Contact: Program in the Humanities and Human Values 919-962-1544 human@unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Sessions
Tuesday, November 15, 2011 - Wednesday, November 16, 2011, 11 AM - 12:15 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2012-2013 Academic Year, and Summer 2012 will be due January 27, 2012. The priority languages for the ASC will be Arabic, Lingala, Kiswahili, and Wolof. Please join us for one of our upcoming info sessions to learn more about FLAS at UNC. Three will be held: 11/15, 11/16, and 12/8. (46 attendees 11/15 and 11/16)   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Sylvia Tamale
Contextualizing Homophobia in Africa

Tuesday, November 15, 2011, 7 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

Dr. Sylvia Tamale is a Ugandan feminist lawyer and former Dean of Law at Makerere University in Uganda. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Law from Makerere University, a Masters from Harvard Law School and a PhD in Sociology and Feminist Studies from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Tamale founded and serves as coordinator of the Law, Gender & Sexuality Research Project, and was also instrumental in introducing the Policy on Sexual Harassment at Makerere University. During her visit to UNC, Dr. Tamale will be discussing her groundbreaking new book African Sexualities: A Reader, which examines African sexualities and investigates the intersections between sex, power, masculinities, and femininities. This event is being held in collaboration with Pambazuka Press. (230 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Amelia DeFosset damelia@email.unc.edu for more information.


The Arab Spring: A Discussion
Friday, November 18, 2011, 5:30-7 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Auditorium, UNC-CH

Explore the causes, the controversies and the hopes for democratization of the Arab Spring in a question and answer discussion with seven experts on the Arab world and electoral design. The program will investigate the elements of democratic reform and explore the prospect of stability in the Arab world. The panel includes: Jason Brownlee, Charlie Kurzman, Tarek Masoud, Andrew Reynolds, Jillian Schwedler, Alfred Stepan, and Carrie Wickham. (250 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Lara Markstein laram@email.unc.edu for more information.


Francophone Africa Symposium
Saturday, November 19, 2011, 10:15 AM
Ackland Art Museum and Fedex Global Education Center, UNC-CH

Schedule of Events: 10:15 am Ackland Art Museum (Re)presenting Africa: African Art from Across the Diaspora. Please meet in the lobby 10 minutes before the tour. Leave bags in the coat check. 1:00 pm Global Education Center, 4th Floor - African Francophone Cinema Roundtable Discussion featuring Nikita Avdiushko, Laura Hancox, Katherine Karcher, Abdoul Salam Maiga, and Angela Peters. 3:00 pm Global Education Center, 4th Floor Defining Exception: Lecture by Prof. Oana Panaite, Indiana University Bloomington. Sponsored by: Center for European Studies, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, and the African Studies Center at UNC-CH.     Please Contact: Martine Antle mcantle@email.unc.edu for more information.



December 2011

FLAS Info Session
Thursday, December 8, 2011, 3 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 2008/2010, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2012-2013 Academic Year, and Summer 2012 will be due January 27, 2012. The priority languages for the ASC will be Arabic, Lingala, Kiswahili, and Wolof. Please join us for one of our upcoming info sessions to learn more about FLAS at UNC. (20 attendees)   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



January 2012

Ethics and Challenges of Global Service Work
Friday, January 27, 2012, 12:30 PM
Campus Y, UNC-CH

Doing work abroad is ethically challenging no matter how good our intentions. This speaker series will feature a diverse group of people with first-hand experience grappling with the ethics of doing service work abroad. For all those interested in discussing, debating, engaging and learning more about the challenges and possibilities of globally-oriented service work, please join us. Speakers include: Gina Chowa, UNC School of Social Work, Carolina for Kibera; Trude Bennett, UNC School of Public Health; Barbara Anderson, UNC African Studies Center; Mathilde Verdier, Program Assistant, Minor in Entrepreneurship and Campus Y   Free.   Please Contact: Michal Osterweil osterwei@email.unc.edu for more information.



February 2012

SERSAS/SEAN Conference
Friday, February 3, 2012 - Saturday, February 4, 2012, Friday evening, Saturday all day.
Fedex Global Education Center, UNC-CH

The South Eastern Regional Seminar on African Studies (SERSAS) and the Southeast Africanist Network will hold their annual conference. SERSAS/SEAN invites the participation of advanced undergraduate and graduate students in addition to faculty. The theme for the conference will be "Border Crossings, Migrations, and Interventions." Conference Website The program includes a welcome reception 6-8 PM on Friday night, and a full program of papers on Saturday, 8:30 AM - 5 PM. Call for Papers (50 attendees)   $20 Faculty, $10 students.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


North Carolina Council for the Social Studies Conference
Thursday, February 23, 2012 - Friday, February 24, 2012,
Greensboro, NC

Conference Theme: Dimensions of Diversity. Session proposals due by November 1, 2011. Please visit http://ncsocialstudies.org/conferences/ for more information.     Please Contact: Melissa Hockaday 919-247-8145 melissahockaday.nccss@gmail.com for more information.


Musical Style and Language Ideology in a Ugandan Proletarian Pop Genre
Prof. David Pier

Thursday, February 23, 2012, 3:30 PM
Hyde Hall, Incubator Room (2nd Floor), UNC-CH

Kadongo kamu is a music that gives voice to the concerns of the Ugandan lower classes, from smallholding farmers, to slum-dwelling day laborers, to underpaid schoolteachers. In its gritty realism about the lives of the poor, it stands apart from contemporary pop genres on radio and television that embrace globalized fantasies of consumer capitalism and the prosperity gospel. In this talk, Prof. Pier will show how poetry and musical style combine in kadongo kamu to foster an awareness of "deep" vernacular language around which a resistant—at times nativist—proletarian identity may be constructed. Dave Pier is an Assistant Professor in the Department of African and Afro-American Studies, specializing in ethnomusicology. This talk is part of the African and Afro-American Studies Faculty Colloquium Series.   Free.   Please Contact: Travis Gore stgore@email.unc.edu for more information.


8th Annual Auction for Education
Sunday, February 26, 2012, TBA
Fedex Global Education Center, Atrium, UNC-CH

The mission of S4Si is to create educational opportunities for high-achieving students in the developing world, with the belief that education is essential to community leadership and a country’s development. S4Si is a university-based, nonprofit organization that provides these opportunities through collaboration with the local communities of Scholars. The auction and dinner are a fundraiser for this organization. Cocktail attire suggested. This year's keynote speaker is Dr. Raichle Farrelly, of the University of Utah. Dr. Farrelly is on the Board of Directors for Girls Education International. She also founded Project Wezesha, a "nonprofit organization committed to increasing access to education for children in rural Tanzania." For more information and to order tickets please visit S4Si.   Adults: $35, Students: $15 pre-order, $17 at-door.   Please Contact: Amelia Ahern aahern@live.unc.edu for more information.


Shared Tables
A Triangle Symposium on Global and Local Food Studies

Tuesday, February 28, 2012 - Wednesday, February 29, 2012, All day.
Varied locations at UNC and Duke

Triangle University Food Studies (TUFS) in coordination with partners at Duke and UNC, are excited to be organizing Shared Tables: A Triangle Symposium on Global and Local Food Studies. Experts will present on Farm Bill 2012, food & fuel, feeding the world sustainably, food access, and food cultures. It will be held at both UNC and Duke. Daytime events (Hyde Hall at UNC and The Bryan Center at Duke) include panelists and speakers on global and local issues in our food and agricultural systems. Evening keynotes include Tom Philpott of Mother Jones Magazine at UNC's FedEx Center on the 28th and Will Allen of Growing Power at Duke's Reynolds Theater on the 29th. Space is limited so registration is required. All events are free and open to students, faculty and community members. For tickets to Will Allen, there will be a $6 service fee through the Duke Box Office. All details and registration information can be found on the website:www.sharedtablessymp.wordpress.com   Free/$6   Please Contact: Jacqueline Olich jmolich@email.unc.edu for more information.



March 2012

Law, Politics, and the Paradoxes of Post Colonial Liberalism in Zambia
Prof. Jeremy Gould

Thursday, March 1, 2012, 3:30 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This talk interrogates some of the continuities and ruptures binding postcolonial to colonial law in order to problematize the interconnection of presidentialism and liberalism in postcolonial African politics. The presentation examines the evidence and outcomes of two parallel ‘abuse of public office’ trials of the late Frederick Chiluba, Zambia’s second president, in search of an understanding of postcolonial government that resists the neoliberal juxtaposition of human rights against sovereignty. Jeremy Gould, an anthropologist by training, is professor of Development and International Cooperation at the University of Jyvaskyla (Finland). He has studied and published about Zambia for 25 years. He is currently completing a book with the working title of Postcolonial jurisprudence. Political legality and popular politics in Zambia’s Third Republic. This talk is part of the African and Afro-American Studies Faculty Colloquium Series.   Free.   Please Contact: Travis Gore stgore@email.unc.edu for more information.


The Genetics of the Peoples of Africa and the Transatlantic African Diaspora
Monday, March 19, 2012 - Tuesday, March 20, 2012, All day.
Friday Center, UNC-CH

International conference hosted by UNC-Chapel Hill, the Center for Research on Genomics and Global Health and the National Institutes of Health. The mission of this conference is to deliver advanced state-of-the art scholarly information on the genetics and genomics of African peoples by nationally and internationally recognized and emerging authorities. For more information, and for registration, please see the Conference Web Site.   Cost varies, $80/100/150.   Please Contact: Conference Organizers africangenetics@unc.edu for more information.


Africa Week 2012
Monday, March 19, 2012 - Sunday, March 25, 2012, Varied times.
Student Union, Great Hall, UNC-CH

The Organization for African Students Interests and Solidarity, O.A.S.I.S. will be hosting the 31st annual Africa Night Show on March 25. The theme of the event this year is “The New Face of Mama Africa” highlighting the ways in which the African continent has transformed throughout the centuries and the important role women play in the transformation and success of the African continent. The event features a dinner of authentic African food, spoken word, fashion showcase of African couture, African traditional dance, and drama. Africa Night will be preceded by a week’s worth of events (Africa Week), including an African cultural Expose on Monday which will be hosted in the Stone Center, A screening and discussion of Wangari Mathaai’s documentary, Taking Root on Tuesday, an African jeopardy/quiz bowl night on Wednesday, a forum related to African Music and how it has fueled the past and present revolutions in the continent on Thursday, and an African movie night to screen an original movie, written and directed by Nigerian nationals on Friday. More Information   Free.   Please Contact: MamHarr Gaye mhgaye@email.unc.edu for more information.


Athol Fugard at UNC
Monday, March 19, 2012 - Friday, March 23, 2012, Varied times.
Please see websites below for locations of events

Athol Fugard will visit UNC as the 2012 Morgan Writer-in Residence from March 19-23, 2012. The South African writer, playwright, and filmmaker will attend the Q&A at a screening of the Academy award winning film Tsotsi (based on his novel) at Varsity; participate on a panel about theatre at the IAH; give a public lecture; participate in staged readings of his plays -- all on the UNC campus. More Information on Athol Fugard Events on Campus In addition, the Carrboro Arts Center will present several performances of his work Blood Knot during the month of March: Blood Knot Performance     Please Contact: Tracy Walker tracy.walker.d@gmail.com for more information.


Kenya and the International Criminal Court: Blessing or Curse?
Dean Makau Mutua

Tuesday, March 20, 2012, 5:30 PM
Stone Center, Auditorium, UNC-CH

Dean Makau Mutua, of The State University of New York will give a talk on Kenya and the International Criminal Court. (75 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Eunice Sahle eunice@email.unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar
The Mother of All Strikes
Pnina Werbner

Thursday, March 22, 2012, 6:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Pnina Werbner will give a talk entitled "The Mother of All Strikes: Popular Protest Culture and Vernacular Cosmopolitanism in the Public Service Strike, Botswana 2011" This talk is co-sponsored by the UNC Department of Anthropology. Pnina Werbner is Professor Emerita of Social Anthropology, Keele University, and author of 'The Manchester Migration Trilogy', including The Migration Process: Capital, Gifts and Offerings among British Pakistanis (1990/2002), Imagined Diasporas among Manchester Muslims (2002) and Pilgrims of Love: the Anthropology of a Global Sufi Cult (2003). In 2008 she edited Anthropology and the New Cosmopolitanism: Rooted, Feminist and Vernacular Perspectives, and is the editor of several theoretical collections on hybridity, multiculturalism, migration and citizenship. She is currently researching and writing a book on the Manual Workers Union and other public service unions in Botswana. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Reading Islamic Text and African Mimesis:
An Ancient Great Transformation?
Richard Werbner, University of Manchester

Monday, March 26, 2012, 3:30 -5 PM.
Alumni Hall, Room 207, UNC-CH

Richard Werbner, Professor Emeritus in African Anthropology and Honorary Research Professor in Visual Anthropology (University of Manchester) and research fellow (National Humanities Center), is a long-term ethnographer of séances, charismatics and faith-healing in Botswana. His most recent films, Holy Hustlers (2009), Counterpoint One (2011), Counterpoint Two (2011) accompany his monograph, Holy Hustlers, Schism and Prophecy (2011). While co-editing Zed’s Postcolonial Encounters Series, he published Postcolonial Identities in Africa (1996), Memory and the Postcolony (1998), Postcolonial Subjectivities in Africa (2002). Co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology and the African Studies Center   Free.   Please Contact: Anna Agbe-Davies agbedavi@email.unc.edu for more information.


Complexity and Vibrancy of Africa
World View Seminar for Educators

Wednesday, March 28, 2012 - Thursday, March 29, 2012, 1 1/2 days
The Friday Center for Continuing Education, UNC-CH

With over 45 countries, several independent island nations, and more than 1 billion people, Africa is a continent rich in diversity. This program will explore global issues related to this continent and strategies for integrating African themes into teaching. Educator Resource Sessions on: Integrating “Africa” into the Curriculum; University Resources for K-12 and CC Educators; African Religions, Music, Literature, and History; Aid and Humanitarianism; and Human Rights and Environmentalism.   $175   Please Contact: Leslie Hodges lhodges@unc.edu for more information.



April 2012

Carolina Seminar
China in Africa

Thursday, April 12, 2012, 6:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

A panel discussion will be held, featuring the following panelists: 1) Margaret C. Lee, Associate Professor, African and Afro-American Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will be speaking on "The Chinese Trading Post in Oshikango, Namibia" 2) Deborah Bräutigam, International Development Program at American University, Currently on leave at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) will present a talk entitled: "China and Africa: Think Again" and 3) Yoon Jung Park, Senior Research Associate, Sociology Department, Rhodes University/Visiting Professor, Africa Studies, Howard University will speak on “Chinese in Africa in the 21st Century.” This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes and is sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. (53 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stephanie Nelson nelsonsc@email.unc.edu for more information.


GO! Spring Pre-Departure Orientation
Saturday, April 14, 2012, 9:30 am - 5 pm
Fedex Global Education Center, UNC-CH

The GO! Global Orientation on Culture and Ethics Initiative is designed to help students evaluate expectations, anticipate potential cultural and ethical challenges, prepare for engagement in communities, and develop intercultural competencies. Highlights of this event are: a welcome by Dr. Jan Boxill, chair of the faculty and director of the Parr Center for Ethics; a student plenary where you'll hear first-hand about ethical challenges faced by other students; small group facilitated discussions where you'll have the opportunity for an engaging and challenging dialog; an intimate global connections lunch with individuals from the countries or regions where you'll travel; two global workshop sessions led by world-renowned faculty and staff on issues of critical importance to your global engagement work; and networking opportunities with other students embarking on global engagement experiences. The orientation is open to UNC students who will complete global engagement work – service, internships, research or service-learning, this summer or next fall. More Information and Registration   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



June 2012

2012 Global Education Leaders Program
Sunday, June 24, 2012 - Friday, June 29, 2012, All Day.
Center for School Leadership Development, Chapel Hill, NC

Each June, 50 educational leaders from across the state come to UNC-Chapel Hill for an intensive study of global issues that impact students and communities. The objective is to help educators in leadership positions to plan and implement programs that will increase global understanding by faculty and students. More Info   $550, includes hotel cost   Please Contact: Robert Phay phay@unc.edu for more information.



September 2012

EVENT CANCELED:
A Tale of Two Gulfs: Biopower, Oil and Security in the Gulf of Mexico and the Gulf of Guinea

Friday, September 7, 2012, 3 PM Reception, 3:30 Presentation
Toy Lounge, Dey Hall, UNC-Chapel Hill

Michael Watts is Professor of Geography and Class of 1963 Chair at the University of California at Berkeley. For many years he served as Director of Berkeley’s Center for International Studies and the Center for African Studies. He is on the advisory board of the SSRC and has shaped many of the leading development programs at major US Foundations. He has been one of the main framers of political ecology and a constant voice for development geographies attentive to the silent violence wrought by global capitalism on local communities, particularly in Africa. In recent years, he has devoted more of his time to his Niger Delta: Economies of Violence project. His Curse of the Black Gold book is online.   Free   Please Contact: Clark Gray cgray@email.unc.edu for more information.


Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film
A Night of Prized Short Films

Tuesday, September 25, 2012, 7 PM
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

The Sonja Haynes Stone Center offers an evening of short films as part of their Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film. A post-film discussion moderated by UNC Professor Donato Fhunsu will follow the screenings. Films shown include: Billy & Aaron, Brooklyn Shakara, Pumzi, and Umkhungo (The Gift). More Information For more information on other titles in this Film Festival, please visit the Stone Center Events Page. (50 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: The Stone Center 919-962-9001 for more information.


Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film
Venus Noire (Black Venus)

Thursday, September 27, 2012, 7 PM
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

he story of Saartjes or Sarah Baartman, a KhoiKhoi woman popularly, and pejoratively, known in Europe as the Hottentot Venus. Baartman arrived in Europe in 1808 following her boss Hendrick Caesar , hoping to earn enough to return home and set up a homestead. But, once in Europe, Hendrick exhibits her as a freak in a series of humiliating shows. Venus Noire highlights Baartmann’s struggle to maintain her humanity in the midst of the dehumanizing racism she experienced in Europe, and her tragic end in a land of strangers. She died alone and abandoned in 1815 at the age of 27 from a combination of pneumonia and venereal disease. A panel discussion follows with Natalie Bullock Brown, St. Augustine’s College; Carol Magee, UNC at Chapel Hill; Charlene Regester, UNC at Chapel Hill. For more information on films in this festival please visit the Stone Center Events Page. (30 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: The Stone Center 919-962-9001 for more information.



October 2012

Advocacy is a Contact Sport:
Political Lawyering and Public Diplomacies: Russia, Thailand, and Zambia
Robert Amsterdam

Thursday, October 4, 2012, 6-7:30 PM
Fred Brooks Hall, Room 009, UNC-CH

Robert Amsterdam is an international lawyer with 32 years experience working on high-profile cases in emerging markets. His law firm Amsterdam & Partners LLP, with offices in London and Washington DC, is frequently sought after for its unique practice areas which explore synergies between public international law, international criminal law, and political advocacy. His unique blend of political advocacy and international law has led to his retention by several world leaders, such as the former Prime Minister of Thailand Thaksin Shinawatra, former President of Zambia Rupiah Banda, Governor Godswill Akpabio of Akwa Ibom State in Nigeria, among other high profile figures. Amsterdam has been retained by major international mining and energy corporations on issues pertaining to resource nationalism and state intervention, while also representing sovereigns in disputes with foreign investors. This talk is sponsored by the Carolina Asia Center, the Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies and the African Studies Center. (50 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stephanie Nelson nelsonsc@email.unc.edu for more information.


Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film
Twilight Revelations: Episodes in the Life and Times of Emperor Haile Selassie

Tuesday, October 9, 2012, 7 PM.
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

Twilight Revelations explores key moments, both public and private, in the life and reign of the last Ethiopian Emperor, Haile Selassie. This documentary shows us the man behind the myth through the eyes of people, who then held leading positions in his government, or worked closely with him. An insightful portrait of a defining figure in African history. A film discussion with Director, Yemane Demisse and UNC Professor Bereket Selassie follows the screening. For more information on films in this series please visit the Stone Center Events Page. (30 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: The Stone Center 919-962-9001 for more information.


Southeast African Languages and Literature Forum
Friday, October 12, 2012 - Sunday, October 14, 2012, All day Saturday, 1/2 day Sunday
University of Florida, Gainesville

The University of Florida Center for African Studies, in association with the department of Languages, Literatures, & Cultures, will host the third annual Southeast African Languages and Literature Forum (SEALLF). The forum aims to promote the study, teaching, examination and overall development of African languages. SEALLF provides a platform for strengthening the teaching of African languages and literature in the Southeastern region of the United States. This year’s conference theme is “African Languages, Literatures, & Cultures: The next level.” The keynote address will be delivered by Professor Timothy Ajani. The title of his presentation is "The Teaching of African Languages, Literatures and Cultures: Blazing New Trails for the 21st Century and beyond." All members of SEALLF are encouraged to send in titles of papers they wish to present before the 15th of September. In addition, those coming from outside of Gainesville, Florida and need accommodation, should get in touch with the Chair of the LOC, Dr. James Essegbey, Languages, Literatures and Cultures, E-mail: essegbey@ufl.edu (20 attendees).   Free   Please Contact: Kole Odutola kodutola@ufl.edu for more information.


SERSAS Fall Conference
Friday, October 19, 2012 - Saturday, October 20, 2012, All day.
Armstrong Atlantic University, Savannah, Georgia

SERSAS (The Southeastern Regional Seminar in African Studies) announces a CFP for its Fall 2012 conference, co- hosted by Armstrong Atlantic University and Georgia Southern University. SERSAS invites paper and panel proposals related to the theme of the modalities of resistance. Of particular interest are papers and panels that seek to explore and complexify the ambiguities related to "collaboration" and "resistance" and that employ multiple theoretical, epistemological and ontological approaches within African Studies to address common substantive problems. Please see the SERSAS Website for information. Deadline for paper submission is September 21, 2012. (25 attendees).   $20   Please Contact: Kenneth Wilburn wilburnk@ecu.edu for more information.



November 2012

Listening to Hiphop with Toussa Senerap and D. Edward Davis
Wednesday, November 7, 2012, Noon.
Music Library Seminar Room, Biddle Music Building, Duke University

Twenty year-old Toussa Senerap resides in Dakar, Senegal. She has appeared and recorded with renowned artists Gaston, Keur Gui Crew, DJ Didier Awadi, Njaaya, and others in urban Senegal. She performed at the 2010 World Social Forum meetings in Dakar, FESMAN World Black Arts Festival, and 72 hours of hip-hop festival (as the only female artist in these forums) and was a finalist in the Senegalese version of American Idol. She writes rhymes and improvises freestyle, mixing her native Wolof with French, English, and other regional indigenous languages. As an activist, Toussa founded GOTAL, a women's hip-hop collective based in Dakar. She was a vocal figure in the 2012 Senegalese elections, in which the hip-hop community played a key role. Co-sponsored by the Women's Studies Program, Africa Initiative at Duke, the Center for French and Francophone Studies, African and African American Studies, and the David L. Paletz Innovative Teaching Fund. More Information   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar
Land and Development:
Land Law Reform and its Social Impact to the rural community in Tanzania
Dr. George Mwaisondola

Thursday, November 8, 2012, 6:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Dr. Mwaisondola is a Professor of Law at St. Augustine University of Tanzania and a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at UNC. His talk will explore the recent land law reforms in African countries, especially in Tanzania, to allow big investment in mining, agriculture, ranching and mortgage industry, and how the reforms squeeze out of their lands small and powerless landholders. Dr. Mwaisondola received his undergraduate degree (LLB) from the University of Dar es Salaam, Master of Laws (LLM in Human Rights) from the University of Pretoria in South Africa and his PhD in Law from the University of Birmingham in the UK. While a PhD student, he taught human rights and international law courses at the Center for the Study of Global Ethics of the University of Birmingham. In 2010, he returned to Tanzania where he joined St Augustine University of Tanzania (SAUT) as an Assistant Professor teaching property law, investment law, and business law. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. (30 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Session
Monday, November 12, 2012, 1 pm.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2013-2014 Academic Year, and Summer 2013 will be due January 31, 2013. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. (12 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Session
Tuesday, November 13, 2012, 11 am.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2013-2014 Academic Year, and Summer 2013 will be due January 31, 2013. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. (20 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


African Studies Association Annual Meeting
Thursday, November 29, 2012 - Saturday, December 1, 2012, All day.
Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA

The ASA Annual Meeting is the largest gathering of Africanist scholars in the world. With an attendance of almost 2,000 scholars and professionals, the conference offers more than 200 panels and roundtables, scholarly and professional plenary and institutional events, awards and prizes, as well as discussion groups, an international exhibit hall, and an on-demand film to appreciate the teaching, research, and professional results of Africanist scholars and that of their colleagues. This year's program theme is Research Frontiers in the Study of Africa. For more information please visit the ASA Web Site.   Cost varies, please see ASA web site for info.   Please Contact: asameeting2012@gmail.com for more information.



December 2012

FLAS Info Session
Thursday, December 6, 2012, 10:30 am.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2013-2014 Academic Year, and Summer 2013 will be due January 31, 2013. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. (23 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



January 2013

W.E.B. Du Bois and the Problems of the 21st Century
Thursday, January 31, 2013 - Saturday, February 2, 2013, All day.
Thursday: Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH
Friday/Saturday: Hyde Hall, University Room, UNC-CH

The conference entitled "W.E.B. Du Bois and the Problems of the 21st Century" will be a three day event held at UNC-CH. The various panels that make up this event include "W.E.B. Du Bois, Africa and Pan-Africanism," "Du Bois on War and Peace," "The Soul and Spirit of Du Bois," and "Du Bois and Education." A highlight of Saturday's events includes the Professional Development Workshop for Public School Educators. DuBois Conference Schedule. (90 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



February 2013

Global Sustainability Symposium
Water and Energy in the Crosshairs

Thursday, February 7, 2013 - Friday, February 8, 2013,
5:30–8 pm (Feb 7) and 8 am–4 pm(Feb 8)
FedEx Global Education Center and the Kenan-Flagler Business School, UNC-Chapel Hill

This third in a four-part series on global sustainability brings together local and global experts to explore key issues related to water and energy in an inter-disciplinary and community gathering. The symposium brings together a diverse audience comprised of faculty, students, business and civic leaders, and citizens of the tri-county region near UNC, with the goal of increasing understanding of issues important to human and ecological peace, health, and well-being. Beyond education, the symposium aims to present possible solutions with examples of best practices, to stimulate a productive discussion, and to enrich the network of those interested and informed about issues like climate change and water. More Info and Registration (398 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Carol Seagle Carol_Seagle@kenan-flagler.unc.edu for more information.


Christian Parenti, Sustainability Symposium Keynote Address
Thursday, February 7, 2013, 5:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center Auditorium, UNC-CH

The first day of the symposium will feature a keynote address by Christian Parenti, author of Tropics of Chaos: Climate Change and the Geography of Violence. Parenti is a contributing editor at The Nation, a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at The Nation Institute, and a visiting scholar at the City University of New York. Climate change is unleashing cascades of extreme weather which directly and indirectly fuel unrest and violence across ever-larger parts of the Global South. Drawing on his recently published book, Christian Parenti will show how environmental crisis is already converging with and exacerbating the socially destabilizing legacies of cold war militarism and neoliberal economics. At the same time, many governments and militaries in the Global North are preparing for the political effects of climate disruption domestically with greater surveillance and police power, and internationally with programs of permanent open-ended counterinsurgency. Author book-signing and a reception will follow the keynote address. This event is free and open to the public; no registration needed. (250 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


SERSAS/SEAN Spring Meeting
Africa Looks Back: Reflections, Constructions, Imaginations

Friday, February 8, 2013 - Saturday, February 9, 2013, All day.
University of Florida, Gainesville

The South Eastern Regional Seminar on African Studies (SERSAS) and the Southeast Africanist Network will hold their annual conference on February 8-9, 2013. SERSAS/SEAN invites the participation of advanced undergraduate and graduate students in addition to faculty, and is co-sponsored by the Center for African Studies, University of Florida and the African Studies Center at UNC - Chapel Hill. Call for Proposals: Contact Todd Leedy, University of Florida tleedy@ufl.edu. How has post-independence Africa engaged with its past? How do contemporary residents depict - for themselves and others - the lives they build? How is the future of Africa imagined by those living in its present? SERSAS and SEAN welcome proposals from scholars in various disciplines who address this general theme, including but not limited to the following topics: architecture, advertising, cinema, dance, drama, heritage & heritage management, literature, popular music, print, televised, and social media. Paper proposals submission deadline: Dec. 17. 2012. View the SERSAS website for details.   Cost varies, please see the SERSAS site for info.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar
Recent Trends in Climate, Development and Food Security in Northern Burkina Faso
Prof. Colin Thor West

Thursday, February 14, 2013, 6:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Colin West, of the UNC Department of Anthropology, focuses his research on ways in which societies adapt to the twin processes of global environmental and social change. His talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. (15 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Prof. Colin West
Climate Change, Food Security, and Population Health

Friday, February 22, 2013, 12:00-1:00 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 2008-10, UNC-CH

The “Heels in the Field: Global Health Discussion Series” occurs each semester and presents a unique forum for open learning and discussion on critical and current health issues with experts in the field. The first speaker of the "Heels in the Field" spring series, Dr. Colin West, will discuss critical issues, innovations and research on population health at the intersection of climate change and food security. Prof. West is an ecological anthropologist who investigates human-environment interactions. He has been working among Mossi smallholder farmers in northern Burkina Faso for over a decade. Colin specializes in integrating his ethnographic approach with innovative new techniques such as agent-based modeling (ABM), geographic information systems GIS, and remote sensing (RS). Please RSVP to laram@email.unc.edu if you plan to attend. Light Snacks Served. (30 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Lara Markstein laram@email.unc.edu for more information.


ReOrienting the Veil
Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies Conference

Friday, February 22, 2013 - Saturday, February 23, 2013, All day.
Fedex Global Education Center Auditorium, UNC-CH

The 2013 Duke-UNC Consortium Conference focuses on Muslim women’s veiling practices in transnational contexts. The one and a half day conference is a forum for an interdisciplinary discussion of the cultural, religious, historical and political meanings of the Muslim headscarf. It is addressed to the NC scholarly communities, to undergraduate and graduate students as well as to NC K-12 and community college teachers and the public at large. This conference will provide NC K-12 teachers an opportunity for professional development and continuing education credits. Conference Website and Registration (150 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Sahar Amer samer@email.unc.edu for more information.


GO! Mixer: International Service/Service-Learning
Monday, February 25, 2013, 5 PM - 6:30 PM.
Campus Y, Anne Queen Lounge, UNC-CH

Are you interested in doing a service or service-learning project this summer, but don’t know where to start? Are you worried that going abroad will cost too much money? Do you have a project lined up, but don’t know what to expect? Find solutions to these challenges and more at the GO! Mixer on International Service/Service-Learning! Meet and mingle with staff and student experts. You’ll come away with the knowledge and confidence to make a successful international service/service-learning project a reality. Refreshments will be served. More Info and to RSVP   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Seodi White
Women’s Rights and HIV/AIDS in Malawi and Southern Africa:
Realities, Successes and Challenges
Brown Bag Lunch

Tuesday, February 26, 2013, 12:30pm-1:30pm
Rosenau Hall, Room 228, UNC-CH

Seodi White is a Gender Expert and Human Rights lawyer, with experience in legal anthropology who is based in Blantyre, Malawi. Her expertise ranges from the feminization of the HIV/AIDS epidemic to gender analysis of legal rights as well as law and policy reform. In addition to her position as the National Coordinator of the Women and Law in Southern Africa Research Trust, Ms. White has worked with various agencies such as UNICEF in South Sudan, UN Mission to Liberia, The Dan Church Aid and Plan International in Tanzania, Zambia, Mozambique and the USAID in Malawi. This event is a brown bag lunch. Light snacks will be provided. (35 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Literature and Human Rights

Tuesday, February 26, 2013, 5:30-7 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center Auditorium, UNC-CH

This event will be a Q & A with award winning author Chimimanda Ngozi Adichie. Ms Adichie is the author of the novels Purple Hibiscus (2003) and Half of a Yellow Sun (2006), and of the short story collection The Thing around Your Neck (2009). She has received numerous awards and distinctions, including the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction (2007) and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2008). Ms. Adichie will be speaking on the topic of Literature and Human Rights. This event is co-sponsored by Curriculum in Global Studies, Department of African and Afro-American Studies, Department of Geography, African Studies Center, College of Arts and Sciences, the Global Education Fund, Center for Global Initiatives, and the Institute for the Arts and Humanities. (340 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Seodi White
Human Rights and Gender Justice in Malawi and Southern Africa

Wednesday, February 27, 2013, 5:30pm-7:00pm
1005 FedEx Global Education Center

Seodi White is a Gender Expert and Human Rights lawyer, with experience in legal anthropology who is based in Blantyre, Malawi. Her expertise ranges from the feminization of the HIV/AIDS epidemic to gender analysis of legal rights as well as law and policy reform. In addition to her position as the National Coordinator of the Women and Law in Southern Africa Research Trust, Ms. White has worked with various agencies such as UNICEF in South Sudan, UN Mission to Liberia, The Dan Church Aid and Plan International in Tanzania, Zambia, Mozambique and the USAID in Malawi. (21 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar
Observations from comparative study of forests and poverty in Africa
Prof. Pamela Jagger

Thursday, February 28, 2013, 6:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3024, UNC-CH

Pamela Jagger, Assistant Professor of Environmental Policy at UNC-Chapel Hill, researches the interface between natural resource management policies and outcomes for rural livelihoods and sustainable resource management in the low income tropics. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. (17 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



March 2013

Financing Development in Africa:
National Initiatives and Donor Support

Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 12:00 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

A panel discussion moderated by Prof. Georges Nzongola and featuring six distinguished visitors from a diverse group of African nations. The panelists, Senior Finance Ministry Officials, will discuss ways in which African nations and their development partners grapple with thorny issues in development financing. Who sets priorities? What issues dominate the dialogue between donor countries and recipient countries? What would an ideal process for allocating donor assistance look like? Sponsored by the African Studies Center, Global Research Initiatives, and the Department of African and Afro-American Studies. (60 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Bright Eke
Water as a Medium, Idea and Concept

Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 6 PM.
Hanes Art Center, Room 121, UNC-CH

Nigerian Bright Ugochukwu Eke, UNC Hanes Visiting Artist-in-Residence, creates socially oriented art, exploring the ways in which people interact with their environments. Using water as a theme and medium, he challenges viewers to think about this precious resource politically, ethically, and ecologically. While at UNC he will collaborate with students to create a large, site-specific installation in the FedEx Global Education Center. This installation will conclude with a celebratory reception March 28 at 5 p.m. Eke's work looks at the interdependence of various networks, and therefore comments on culture and the environment as much as it derives from them-conceptually or physically. His public talk will offer insight into his working process, as he discusses why he uses water and the inspirations for his various projects; a reception will follow. Born in Mbaise, Nigeria, Eke currently lives in Los Angeles. He received his BA and MFA from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka and has exhibited in locations throughout the world. This event is hosted by the UNC Art Department with support from the African Studies Center and UNC Global.   Free.   Please Contact: Carol Magee cmagee@email.unc.edu for more information.


Mama C: Urban Warrior in the African Bush
Film and Discussion

Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 7-9 PM.
Sonja Haynes Stone Center, UNC-CH

Mama C: Urban Warrior in the African Bush tells the story of Charlotte O’Neal—or Mama C as she is known—poet, musician, visual artist, spoken word artist and ex-member of the Kansas City Black Panther Party. Mama C, whose life was formed growing up in the artistically and politically vibrant atmosphere of the African American community in Kansas City, KS, has lived for the past forty years in the Tanzanian village of Imbaseni. *Following screening, reception and film discussion with film director UNC Professor Joanne Hershfield and Charlotte O’Neal. This event is co-sponsored by UNC Department of Music; North Carolina State University African American Cultural Center; UNC African Studies Center; UNC Center for Global Initiatives and Ackland Art Museum.   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Mama C: Spoken Word and Music Performance
Wednesday, March 20, 2013, 4-5 PM.
Ackland Art Museum, UNC-CH

A former member of the Kansas City Black Panther Party, "Mama C" was greatly influenced in her early years by that city's jazz, blues, and gospel. She integrates elements of that experience into her music and poetry, along with African and hip-hop beats. Her song-writing and performing talents have been showcased on stage, television, and radio in Africa and America. Mama C is co-director of the Arusha Poetry Club in Tanzania, which serves as a platform for East African poets and artists.   Free.   Please Contact: Allison Portnow 919-843-3687 aportnow@email.unc.edu for more information.


Introduction to Malawi:
A Workshop on Chichewa Language and Malawi Culture

Thursday, March 21, 2013, 5:30-7:30 PM
UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, McGavran-Greenberg Hall, Room 2304

This four-part workshop will focus on introductory words and greetings in Chichewa, medical interview vocabulary, and linguistic cultural sensitivity in health services for UNC students, staff and faculty who plan to work in Malawi. Each session will provide health / cultural training, insights to elementary language construction, as well as brief presentations on the history, geography, politics and economy of Malawi. Participants will be provided with readings and basic language materials. Dinner will be provided. Attendance at a minimum of 3 sessions is required. Thursdays – March 21st, March 28th, April 4th & April 11th from 5:30 pm -7:30 pm. Space is limited - please register by emailing Mamie Harris at malawi@unc.edu This workshop is sponsored by the UNC Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases and the Department of African and Afro-American Studies. (15 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Mamie Harris malawi@unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar
Evaluating Forest Sector Decentralization in Tanzania:
A triple win for livelihoods, governance and forests?
Prof. Lauren Persha

Thursday, March 21, 2013, 6:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Lauren Persha, of the UNC department of Geography, researches issues on conservation and development, social-ecological systems, institutional analysis, environmental governance, forest ecology, and political ecology in East Africa. Her talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. Free. Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Global Rights of Access to HIV drugs and Clean Water
Prof. Benjamin Meier

Wednesday, March 27, 2013, 5:30 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 1009, UNC-CH

This talk is part of the “Heels in the Field: Global Health Discussion Series” which occurs each semester and presents a unique forum for open learning and discussion on critical and current health issues with experts in the field. Please RSVP to laram@email.unc.edu if you plan to attend. Light Snacks Served. (50 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Lara Markstein laram@email.unc.edu for more information.



April 2013

African Language Fair/Night
Thursday, April 11, 2013, 9:30AM-6:30PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Atrium, UNC-CH

Get to know African language instructors, meet past and current African language students, hear about African languages, watch African language students speak, sing and perform, and have a taste of African food! (100 attendees).   Free   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Market Imaginary Film Screening
Monday, April 15, 2013, 5 PM
Wilson Hall, Rm 107, UNC-CH

Film screening followed by discussion with writer, director, and producer Joanna Grabski. Market Imaginary explores the commercial/social, historical/spatial, and visual/creative imaginaries around Colobane Market in Dakar, Senegal. This film considers the many ways Colobane market is embedded in its neighborhood and the broader imagination of Dakar’s residents. It features interviews with Viyé Diba, Abdoulaye Ndoye, Ndary Lo, Cheikh Ndiaye, Fally Sene Sow, 2Pac Colobane, Docta, Vieux Cissé, Aminata Diop, El Hadji Ousmane Mbenga, Ndeye Fatou Gueye, and Ousmane Sene. View the film's trailer. Joanna Grabski is Associate Professor and Chair of Art History at Denison University. Her research and publications have focused on visual and urban projects in Dakar, Senegal and Brazzaville, Congo. Film running time 53 minutes. Dialogue in Wolof, French and English. Subtitles in English.   Free.   Please Contact: Carol Magee cmagee@email.unc.edu for more information.



May 2013

International Social Welfare Lecture
Welfare Service Delivery in South Africa
Prof. Leila Patel

Thursday, May 16, 2013, Noon.
Tate Turner Kuralt Building, Room 300, UNC-CH

Leila Patel will address the potential and challenge of constructing a democratic developmental welfare state in South Africa through synergistic state-civil society relations. While South Africa’s pluralist approach, involving a leading role for the state in partnership with voluntary organizations which are the main service providers, is a viable policy option to address the country’s developmental challenges, anomalies between policy proclamations and actual practice raises questions about the efficacy of the partnership model and the gendered nature of welfare provision. Issues in policy implementation are addressed including pointers for future action. Leila Patel is the Director of the Centre for Social Development in Africa and Professor of Social Development Studies at the University of Johannesburg. She was previously the Director General of Social Welfare in South Africa and Deputy Vice Chancellor and Vice-Principal of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. She played a leading role in the development of South Africa’s welfare policy after apartheid.   Free.   Please Contact: Gina Chowa chowa@email.unc.edu for more information.



September 2013

Global Health Policy in the 2nd Obama Term
Dr. J. Stephen Morrison

Wednesday, September 4, 2013, 12:30 - 1:45 PM.
Rosenau Hall, Room 133, UNC-CH

Come hear J. Stephen Morrison, PhD, Senior Vice President and Director of the Global Health Policy Center, Center for Strategic and International Studies, speak about the direction of global health policy in the coming years. (90 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Mamie Harris Mamie_Harris@med.unc.edu for more information.


Study Abroad Fair
Friday, September 13, 2013, 10 AM-3PM.
Student Union, Great Hall, UNC-CH

Join us to learn more about Study Abroad programs in Senegal and South Africa, as well as other Study Abroad opportunities. Bring your ONE Card for entrance to the Fair.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


SERSAS Fall Conference
Africa and the Atlantic World

Friday, September 27, 2013 - Saturday, September 28, 2013, TBD
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC

Held on campuses bi-annually throughout the southeast since 1973, the Southeastern Regional Seminar in African Studies (SERSAS) will be hosted this fall by East Carolina University. This year's music program, which will coincide with Friday evening's SERSAS welcome reception, will be a performance of Afro-Andean music by Zamba Yawar conducted by Mario Rey. Four exhibitions of ECU's African art collection will be on display throughout the university to celebrate both our SERSAS conference and progress to date to establish an African art museum on ECU's campus. Sharon Pruitt, ECU's African art historian, will share the history of ECU's African art collection. Please join us for what promises to be another exciting and friendly SERSAS Conference at East Carolina University. (100 attendees).   $30 Payable On Site   Please Contact: Kenneth Wilburn wilburnk@ecu.edu for more information.



October 2013

Celebrating Congo
Friday, October 4, 2013 - Saturday, October 5, 2013,
Friday 7-8 PM, Saturday 10:30 AM-7 PM.
Stone Center, UNC-CH

An interdisciplinary cultural festival/conference focusing on Congo advocacy. The Salaam Kivu International Film Festival, which is organized annually in eastern Congo by Yole!Africa, will have a satellite edition in the US at UNC. This event is the 2013-14 Music On The Hill festival. The event includes film screenings and discussions, music performances, visual arts installations, as well as a series of conference panels addressing effective ways of approaching Congo advocacy from the US. Find more information at Celebrating Congo. (138 attendees Friday, 650 attendees Saturday).   Free.   Please Contact: Chérie Ndaliko ndaliko@email.unc.edu for more information.


Scaling Up to Save Lives in Developing Countries
Dr. Eric Bing

Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 1-2 PM.
Rosenau Hall, Room 133, UNC-CH

Dr. Eric G. Bing spearheads the George W. Bush Institute’s global health initiatives with an emphasis on creating programs that engage both public and private sectors. With the practical engagement of business approaches, innovation and entrepreneurship, Dr. Bing shares how we can help cross that final mile to solve global challenges of poverty and health. Dr. Bing received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, a master of public health and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from UCLA, & an M.B.A. from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University. (90 attendees).   Free   Please Contact: Mamie Harris mamie_Harris@med.unc.edu for more information.


Girls’ Education in Africa
Barbara Anderson

Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM.
Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill

This talk addresses the challenges and promises for girls’ and women’s education in Africa, exploring the ways that European colonialism, missionary work, and contemporary neocolonial economic policies shape African educational opportunities and experiences. It also provides some interesting comparisons in female education between the developed and developing world. Program Tuition: Register ahead of time and pay $18.00 per program or pay only $8 if you are a member of the UNC General Alumni Association (GAA). Tuition is $20.00 for everyone paying at the door. Find more information at Girls' Education in Africa. (21 attendees)     Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


From the Coup d’Etat to the Restoration of Democracy:
Regional Diplomacy and African Union Perspectives on the 2012 Coup
Prof. Georges Nzongola

Thursday, October 24, 2013, 12:30-2 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Professor Georges Nzongola will give this lecture as part of a new seminar series to expand understanding and discussion of the 2012 military coup in Mali and the subsequent Ansar Dine and Al-Qaeda in the Maghreb occupations of northern Mali. Emily Burrill of UNC will facilitate. This seminar is co-sponsored by the African Studies Center, the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, and the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. Remaining dates for this lunchtime series will be Oct. 31, Nov. 7 and Nov. 12. Light lunch will be provided. RSVP required for lunch. (17 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


The Role of the Artist in a Time of Political Struggle
Mamadou Diabate
333 Saints: A Life of Scholarship in Timbuktu­
Alexandra Huddleston

Tuesday, October 29, 2013, Presentations 5:30 PM, reception to follow.
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 1005, UNC-CH

This presentation is part of a seminar series to expand understanding and discussion of the 2012 military coup in Mali, the subsequent Ansar Dine and Al-Qaeda in the Maghreb (AQIM) occupations of northern Mali, and the recent presidential election of Ibrahim Boubacar Keita. Mamadou Diabate, renowned Kora musician from Mali will discuss the suppression of music during the AQIM occupation and perceptions of the coup in the Diaspora. Alexandra Huddleston will talk and exhibit photos from her new book, 333 Saints; A Life of Scholarship in Timbuktu. A book which tells a story of discovery: unfolding a rich and beautiful African intellectual culture that remains largely unknown in the West. Her book is about a city that has built its identity around a culture of scholarship and a love of books and learning. Reception to follow, honoring faculty and student awardees and our 2013 Visiting Fulbright Scholar, Dr. Patricia Mabugu. RSVP required for reception: please email Stacey Sewall to RSVP. This seminar is co-sponsored by the African Studies Center, the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, and the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. (38 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Competing Racial Narratives of Violence in Contemporary Mali
Prof. Bruce Hall

Thursday, October 31, 2013, 12:30-2 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This lecture is part of a new seminar series to expand understanding and discussion of the 2012 military coup in Mali and the subsequent Ansar Dine and Al-Qaeda in the Maghreb occupations of northern Mali. Emily Burrill of UNC will facilitate. This seminar is co-sponsored by the African Studies Center, the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, and the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. Remaining dates for this lunchtime series will be Nov. 7 and Nov. 12. Light lunch will be provided. RSVP required for lunch. (21 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



November 2013

Carolina for Kibera Fellowhip Info Session
Monday, November 4, 2013, 5-6:30PM
FedEx Global Education Center

Carolina for Kibera’s Fellowship Program offers UNC students a chance to work alongside a grassroots, non-profit organization to fight poverty in one of Africa’s largest slums, Kibera, Kenya. Fellows work with US and Kenyan-based staff in the spring semester on collaborative projects to affect sustainable change, and then travel to Kibera in the summer to implement them. The following sessions will be on November 12th and 20th which will also be held in the FedEx Global Education Center. (30 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Nick Johnson cfk@unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Session
Wednesday, November 6, 2013, 1 PM.
Carroll Hall, Hall of Fame, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2014-2015 Academic Year, and Summer 2014 will be due January 31, 2014. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. The remaining info sessions include Nov. 12, Nov. 13, Nov. 19, and Dec. 5. (15 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Mali's Political History: From Democracy to "Terrorist Haven" - and Back Again
Prof. Greg Mann

Thursday, November 7, 2013, 12:30-2 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Professor Greg Mann from Columbia University will give this lecture as part of a new seminar series to expand understanding and discussion of the 2012 military coup in Mali and the subsequent Ansar Dine and Al-Qaeda in the Maghreb occupations of northern Mali. Emily Burrill of UNC will facilitate. This seminar is co-sponsored by the African Studies Center, the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, and the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. The remaining date for this lunchtime series will be Nov. 12. Light lunch will be provided. RSVP required for lunch. (42 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Public Service - Careers in Federal Government for Students Studying Africa
Randy B. Cheek

Friday, November 8, 2013, 3 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Mr. Randy Cheek has spent nearly 30 years of government service working primarily to promote strategic planning and inter-agency coordination from a non-traditional security perspective. His specific area of interest is Africa, with non-traditional threats to security a major focus. His career has included the State Department, the Department of Defense, the National Defense University, and the Bureau of African Affairs, International Security Affairs. Mr. Cheek has worked closely with the United Nations, the European Union, the African Union, African regional organizations and numerous African governments. He has lectured at the National Defense Colleges of South Africa, Botswana, Zambia and Kenya. He currently consults with various US and international interests focusing on Africa and lectures frequently to academic, government, and business groups. (21 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Session
Tuesday, November 12, 2013, 11 AM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2014-2015 Academic Year, and Summer 2014 will be due January 31, 2014. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. The remaining info sessions include Nov. 13, Nov. 19, and Dec. 5. (20 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Malian Women in the Political Sphere: From the 1990s to the Present
Oumou Sidibe, Univ. of Paris/Independent Scholar

Tuesday, November 12, 2013, 12:30-2 PM.
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This lecture is the final part of a new seminar series to expand understanding and discussion of the 2012 military coup in Mali and the subsequent Ansar Dine and Al-Qaeda in the Maghreb occupations of northern Mali. Emily Burrill of UNC will facilitate. This seminar is co-sponsored by the African Studies Center, the Department of Women's and Gender Studies, the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, and the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. Light lunch will be provided. RSVP required for lunch. (15 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Session
Wednesday, November 13, 2013, 3 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2014-2015 Academic Year, and Summer 2014 will be due January 31, 2014. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. The remaining info sessions include Nov. 19 and Dec. 5. (20 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


The Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film
Lunch and a Movie: Zanzibar Soccer Queens

Thursday, November 14, 2013, 12:00-1:30 PM.
Stone Center, Hitchcock Room, UNC-CH

This powerful documentary film, directed by Florence Ayisi, shows how Muslim women use soccer as their vehicle for liberation and creativity in a conservative society. While the film focuses on women, their desire for self-fulfillment and empowerment speaks to marginalized people everywhere. This event is co-sponsored by the African Studies Center at UNC at Chapel Hill and the Carolina Women’s Center. This event is Free and Open to the Public, but you MUST RSVP 24 hours in advance by email (below) or via Facebook. (32 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stone Center stonecenter@unc.edu for more information.


Dialogues on East Africa and African Unity at 50
Monday, November 18, 2013, 10 AM-5 PM, 6-7 PM
10.00AM-5.00PM PROGRAM (HYDE HALL, UNIVERSITY ROOM)
6.00PM-7.00PM, KEYNOTE LECTURE (STONE CENTER, AUDITORIUM)

This is a one-day symposium, sponsored by the UNC Department of African, African-American, and Diaspora Studies, offered on the theme "Dialogues on East Africa and African Unity at 50." Program:
10.00am-10:30am: Arrival and opening remarks: Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja (UNC-Chapel Hill)
10.30AM- 12.00PM (ROUNDTABLE): FROM THE ORGANIZATION OF AFRICAN UNITY TO AFRICAN UNION Chair: Eunice N. Sahle and Panelists: Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja, Bereket H. Selassie, Peter Anyang’ Nyong’o
12.00PM-1.30PM: LUNCH.
1.30PM- 3.00PM: NATIONAL COHENSION, BLACK DIASPORA IN THE INDIAN OCEAN AND EXTERNAL RELATIONS Chair: Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja and Panelists: Mueni wa Muiu and Guy Martin, Gaurav Desai, Omar Ali
3.30PM- 5.00PM: DEBATES ON LANGUAGE, DISPLACEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT Chair: Kenneth Janken and Panelists: Esther M. Lisanza, Marie Garlock, Eunice N. Sahle
6.00PM-7.00PM: KEYNOTE LECTURE (STONE CENTER); Introduction: Jonathan Hartlyn (UNC-Chapel Hill), Senior Associate Dean for Social Sciences and Global Programs; Keynote Lecture: Peter Anyang’ Nyong’o (Gro Harlem Brundland Senior Leadership Fellow, Harvard University).
Sponsored by: Department of African, African American and Diaspora Studies and the African Studies Center. (75 attendees)   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Session
Tuesday, November 19, 2013, 12 PM.
School of Law, Room 4082, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2014-2015 Academic Year, and Summer 2014 will be due January 31, 2014. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. The remaining info session is Dec. 5. (8 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



December 2013

FLAS Info Session
Thursday, December 5, 2013, 11 AM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2014-2015 Academic Year, and Summer 2014 will be due January 31, 2014. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. (23 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



February 2014

* New Date *
S4Si Film Screening and Discussion: Girl Rising

Monday, February 3, 2014, 7pm
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

S4Si (Students for Students International) is a student organization at UNC Chapel Hill that seeks to create educational opportunities for high-achieving students in the developing world. The film "Girl Rising" will be screened. "Girl Rising" is a film that displays collections of stories from around the globe that demonstrate how the world can be changed through educating girls. The film profiles the stories of Sokha, Yasmin, Azmera, and many others. (35 attendees)   Free.   Please Contact: Alice Huang a.huang343@gmail.com for more information.


UNC Libraries Guide for African Studies
Tuesday, February 18, 2014, 12-1:30 PM.
Davis Library, Room 214, UNC-CH

UNC Libraries will offer a lunch session focused on the new Guide for African Studies and other Library services for faculty and graduate students. Come “walk through” the new Guide and offer your feedback on the resource to the librarians who created it. This will be a great opportunity for us in the Library to hear from you about how we could improve our collections and services to better support faculty and graduate students’ research and instruction for African studies. Lunch from Palace International will be served. Please RSVP by Friday, February 14th by emailing Stacey Sewall at sewall@email.unc.edu. The program will include: Scholarly Communication Services: copyright and fair use, authors' rights, privacy rights, open access, and other important information to the creation and use of scholarly material; Digital Repository Services; Funding Opportunities for faculty and researchers; African and Global Health Resources and Services; Media Resources Center’s collections and services; - and the Library Guide for African Studies. (24 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Mohamed Hamed mseoud@email.unc.edu for more information.


Keur Gui
Wednesday, February 19, 2014, 6 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Noted Senegalese hip hop group, Keur Gui, will discuss their involvement with democratic reform activism in the last election in Senegal. This event is co-sponsored by Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. Light dinner will be served. RSVP requested: Please RSVP to Stacey Sewall: sewall@email.unc.edu   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Star Families: African Skies
Saturday, February 22, 2014, 3:30pm
Morehead Planetarium and Science Center

Explore astronomy themes as a family! This edition of the engaging Star Families series is designed for children (ages 7-12) accompanied by their families as you learn about Anansi, the Spider, one of the characters you’ll meet through this retelling of African sky legends under a planetarium dome filled with stars.   Free   Please Contact: Morehead Planetarium Outreach charden@email.unc.edu for more information.


Education in East Africa
Tuesday, February 25, 2014, 2:00-5:00 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

American, Kenyan, and Tanzanian educators will discuss successful strategies and challenges faced in classrooms in East Africa, as well as in North Carolina. Literacy Through Photography (LTP) is a teaching methodology and philosophy that combines photography and writing to enhance critical thinking and creativity and improve visual, written and cultural literacy. LTP has been used by schools in Durham, North Carolina for over twenty years and by educators around the world, including in Arusha, Tanzania. A feature of the LTP project is its integration of indigenous knowledge through local customs and culturally based stories and sayings. The faces and voices and "ways of thinking" in the partnership communities are respected and contribute to the knowledge base of the project. Presenters include Dr. Suzanne Gulledge, UNC; Dr. Esther Lisanza, UNC; Mr. Shaibu Pelle, Director of LTP Tanzania; and Wendy Ewald, Director of LTP International. (40 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Suzanne Gulledge sgulledg@email.unc.edu for more information.


La Pirogue (The Pirogue)
Tuesday, February 25, 2014, 6:30
Fedex Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

Moussa Toure's trenchant chronicle of a sea trek from West Africa to Europe lays bare the incalculable perils of immigration, as veteran fisherman Baye Laye reluctantly agrees to be the captain of the long, narrow canoe of the title. Illegally transporting roughly 30 people from Dakar Senegal, to Spain, the pirogue's passengers each hope to start anew in the West and escape the grim economic realities at home. Unlike most films about immigration, The Pirogue refuses to speak in hazy ideologies: it presents the brutal realities that millions worldwide face in the effort to leave on land for another. (145 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: The Department of Romance Languages camelle@unc.edu for more information.



March 2014

Memory and Imagination in the Making of African Identities
Spring SERSAS-SEAN Conference

Friday, March 7, 2014 - Saturday, March 8, 2014, All day.
Georgia College and State University, Milledgeville, Georgia

Founded at the University of Florida in 2000, SEAN (SouthEast Africanist Network) partnered with SERSAS (Southeastern Regional Seminar on African Studies) in 2010. Each year, the two organizations hold an annual meeting to promote African Studies programs at colleges and universities throughout the southeast. The Spring 2014 SERSAS-SEAN Conference seeks to give faculty, independent scholars, and graduate students the opportunity to share scholarship within the SERSAS's friendly atmosphere.The coordinators of SERSAS cordially invite you to present your work within the wide parameters of the conference's theme; that focuses on how memory and imagination helps us first make and interpret meaning from the multiple and often intersecting identities reflected in African people, societies, and states. Paper submissions may come from a wide variety of acadmic disciplines, including but not limited to: anthropology, medicine, economics, geography, history, literary studies, maritime studies, music, African and foreign languages, and political science. Graduate students are encouraged to present their work in order for a chance to win the SERSAS annual prize for best graduate student paper. Please send proposals of no more than 300 words to: Anta Sane: antasane@yahoo.com Aran MacKinnon: aran.mackinnon@gcsu.edu Ken Wilburn: wilburnk@ecu.edu The deadlihne for submmissions is February 1, 2014. (45 attendees).     Please Contact: Kenneth Wilburn wilburnk@ecu.edu for more information.


UNC Global Passport Drive
Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 10 AM - 3 PM.
FedEx Global Education Center, Fourth Floor, UNC-CH

Take advantage of an easy one-stop shopping, on-campus opportunity to apply for or renew your U.S. passport at the FedEx Global Education Center on Tuesday, March 18 and Wednesday, March 19 between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. These sessions will be on the fourth floor of the FedEx Global Education Center. Officials from the U.S. Department of State will be on campus both days to accept passport applications and renewal applications (forms available at the event). Students, faculty, staff and their families are invited to attend. Have a passport photo taken at the event for $7 by UNC One Card, or before the event at the UNC One Card Office. It is encouraged to get your photos before the event to avoid waiting. (289 applicants).   Prices Vary   Please Contact: ingrid.smith@unc.edu for more information.


Juan Latino and the Dawn of Modernity
A lecture by Michael A. Gómez
In Celebration of UNC Library's Seven Millionth Volume

Thursday, March 20, 2014, 5:30 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Peacock Atrium, UNC-CH

A rare sixteenth-century book with modern resonance will become the seven-millionth volume in the library at UNC-Chapel Hill. A free public celebration on March 20 will mark the acquisition of a book of Latin poetry published in 1573 by Juan Latino. Scholars have described Latino as the first person of sub-Saharan African descent to publish a book of poems in a Western language. With this milestone, UNC becomes one of only 21 university libraries in North America to hold more than seven million volumes. It also becomes one of a handful of U.S. libraries—including Harvard, Yale, the Boston Public Library and the New York Public Library—to own this first book of Juan Latino. Visitors will be able to view the book during a reception beginning at 5:30 p.m. in the Peacock Atrium of the FedEx Global Education Center. At 6 p.m. in the Nelson Mandela Auditorium of the FedEx Center, Chancellor Carol Folt will formally accept the book as a gift of the John Wesley and Anna Hodgin Hanes Foundation of Winston-Salem. Through its foundation, the Hanes family has funded each of the Library’s millionth volumes. Michael A. Gómez, professor of history and Middle Eastern and Islamic studies at New York University, will conclude the evening with a lecture titled “Juan Latino and the Dawn of Modernity.” The volume will will become part of the Rare Book Collection in UNC’s Wilson Special Collections Library. (200 attendees)   Free.   Please Contact: Lisa Teril (919) 548-1203 for more information.


Arabic and Islamic Culture Seminar
Friday, March 21, 2014 - Saturday, March 22, 2014, 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM.
Friday Site: Center for school Leadership Development, Chapel Hill
Saturday Site: FedEx Global Center, UNC-CH

This seminar will be designed for teachers for grades 6 and 7 and World History. The seminar session topics will include the Qu'ran, Islam, Asian Trade and calligraphy among many more. Seminar participants will submit one middle grade or world history lesson plan based on the content of the seminar. Lesson plan templates will be provided. CEU certificates will be awarded for attending both days of the seminar and after submitting the lesson plan by the announced due date. (15 attendees).   $25.00 registration fee   Please Contact: Steve Pierce go.geoliteracy.ncga@gmail.com. for more information.


Literature and Cultures of the Maghreb
Kebir Ammi

Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 4:30 pm
Dey Hall, Toy Lounge, UNC-CH

Kebir Ammi will give a lecture in English on the literature and cultures from the Maghreb, the Northwest region of Africa. Kebir Ammi is a Moroccan writer, lived in France for more than thirty years, has authored many books, and teaches English. (25 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Dominique Fisher domfisc@email.unc.edu for more information.


Introduction to Malawi:
A Workshop on Chichewa Language and Malawi Culture

Thursday, March 27, 2014, 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM.
UNC Gillings School of Public Health, Room TBD.

This four-part workshop will focus on introductory Chichewa greetings and linguistics, medical interview vocabulary, and cultural sensitivity in health services for UNC students, staff and faculty planning research, service or internships in Malawi. Workshop sessions cover elementary language construction, health and cultural training, as well as brief presentations on the history, geography, politics and economy of Malawi. Participants will be provided soft copies of readings and basic language material. Dinner will be provided. There will be four sessions on March 27th, April 3rd, April 10th, and April 17th from 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM. Attendance at a minimum of 3 sessions is required. Space is limited - please register by emailing Mamie Harris. (18 attendees).   Free   Please Contact: Mamie Harris malawi@unc.edu for more information.


10th Annual Auction for Education
Saturday, March 29, 2014, 4:00 pm
Fedex Global Education Center, Atrium, UNC-CH

The mission of S4Si is to create educational opportunities for high-achieving students in the developing world, with the belief that education is essential to community leadership and a country’s development. S4Si is a university-based, nonprofit organization that provides these opportunities through collaboration with the local communities of Scholars. The auction and dinner are a fundraiser for this organization. Cocktail attire suggested. This year's keynote speaker is Dr. Raichle Farrelly, of the University of Utah. Dr. Farrelly is on the Board of Directors for Girls Education International. She also founded Project Wezesha, a "nonprofit organization committed to increasing access to education for children in rural Tanzania." For more information and to order tickets please visit S4Si. (80 attendees).   Adults: $35, Students: $15 pre-order, $17 at-door.   Please Contact: Alice Huang ahhuang@live.unc.edu for more information.



April 2014

Remembering Rwanda
Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 3:00-5:00 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This April the world will mark the 20th anniversary of the genocide in Rwanda, which began on April 7, 1994. Join UNC African Studies scholars and students for discussion of the enduring regional and international repercussions of this important experience. Dr. Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja will speak on “The Rwanda Genocide and its Repercussions in the Great Lakes Region,” Dr. Michael Lambert will speak on "A Brief History of the Rwanda Genocide," and Dr. Bereket Selassie will discuss “International Criminal Justice and the Rwanda Genocide.” This event is co-sponsored by Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. (67 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


The Story of Cities:
Global and Local Perspectives on the Quest for Sustainable Communities

Wednesday, April 2, 2014 - Thursday, April 3, 2014, Time varies.
Varsity Theatre (Cola Road documentary) and
FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-CH

Join this year's global sustainability symposium to examine the factors that create healthy and innovative communities where people and businesses thrive across the globe. Participants will learn from the examples of Dubai, Mumbai, Shanghai, The Hague, and Durham. Conference will feature discussion of innovative models from around the world and networking with practitioners, scholars, students, and community members. From 6:30-8:00 pm on April 2 the Symposium will screen The Cola Road with discussion to follow, in the Varsity Theatre in Chapel Hill. On April 3, meetings will be held in the Global Education Center. Registration Required. To register and for more information, please visit: http://www.gbc.unc.edu/SustainabilitySymposium/ (72 attendees Wednesday, 94 attendees Thursday).   Free.   Please Contact: Julia Kruse 919-962-4929 Julia_Kruse@kenan-flagler.unc.edu for more information.


Water, Health and Environment:
Experiences from African, African American and Diaspora Geographies

Thursday, April 3, 2014 - Saturday, April 5, 2014, Time varies.
Sonja Haynes Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

The Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies will hold their 2nd Annual Global Africana Conference. Presentations include: "Water and Natural Resources Governance in Africa" and "Health, Representation and Aid." The keynote address will be given by Kenneth Bailey on the topic: Speculations on Design, Environment and Justice. For more information please see the Program. (230 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Travis Gore stgore@email.unc.edu for more information.


GO! Initiative Spring Orientation
Saturday, April 5, 2014, TBD
FedEx Global Education Center, UNC-CH

GO! Initiative’s Spring Orientation is a free conference for UNC students who are interested and/or are planning to go abroad. Adding a global dimension to your academic career? Before you pack your bags and jet set off to explore this complex world, learn about what it means to go abroad, whether you’re traveling, studying, conducting research or serving the global community. To navigate through this complex system, the GO! Initiative, a daylong conference on global culture and ethics, will give you the opportunity to explore cultural contexts, build realistic expectations and anticipate ethical issues. Hear about challenges students faced, network with Carolina’s international community and gain hands-on skills from workshops and seminars led by expert faculty and staff. (156 attendees).   Free   Please Contact: Priyanka Vakil (919) 962-6857 pvakil@unc.edu for more information.


Nelson Mandela Lunch Series
Monday, April 7, 2014, Noon-1:30 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center and UNC Global have collaborated to create the Nelson Mandela Lunch Series in hopes of preserving Mandela’s memory and continuing his legacy of peace, hope and dignity. This lunch series will commence in spring 2014 and continue through fall 2014. Kenneth Broun, the Henry Brandis Professor of Law Emeritus at UNC, and Bereket Selassie, the William E. Leuchtenburg Professor of African Studies and a professor of law at UNC, will take part in this opening session. Broun will reflect on how Nelson Mandela's life was spared at his 1963-64 trial and what it meant to South Africa and the world that he was alive to lead the transition away from apartheid. Selassie will discuss Nelson Mandela's legacy to South Africa and to the continent as a whole and his stature as a moral icon. A question and answer session moderated by Michael Lambert, Director of the African Studies Center, will follow the presentations. Advance registration is required for this lunch event. Please contact Ingrid Smith ingrids@email.unc.eduwith questions or to register. (25 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Ingrid Smith ingrids@email.unc.edu for more information.


Origin Stories about Segregationist Philanthropy: The Carnegie Corporation in South Africa
Tiffany Willoughby-­‐Herard

Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 12:30-2:00 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Dr.Tiffany Willoughby-­‐Herard is an assistant professor in African American Studies and the Program in Culture and Theory at the University of California, Irvine. Her book, Waste of a White Skin: The Carnegie Corporation and the Racial Logic of White Vulnerability, is forthcoming from the University of California Press. This presentation will explore how philanthropy and research by the Carnegie Corporation shored up white supremacy in South Africa. It examines how scientific racism and the “South Africanization” of eugenic science were critical to the manufacture of white citizenship, transforming settlers into white people. It also calls for re-­‐centering geopolitical conditions especially the global color line which included pervasive white on white class and racial violence and economic devastation for black people. (8 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Kia Caldwell klcaldwe@email.unc.edu for more information.



May 2014

Visual Illumination Across Borders: The Conceptual African Art Forms
Sunday, May 11, 2014, 4:30 PM
Exotique, 319 W. Main Street, Durham

Kunle Adeyemi, PhD, will be speaking on Visual Illuminations Across Borders: The Genesis of Paintograph and Paintocast at Exotique.   Free.   Please Contact: Adeyemi Olufolabi (919)260-0980 olufo001@hotmail.com for more information.



September 2014

South Sudan in Crisis
Humanitarian Medical Work & Impact of Civil War
On a Primary Care, Kala-Azar and TB Project
Dr. Jill Seaman

Thursday, September 4, 2014, 5 PM.
Michael Hooker Research Center, BCBS Auditorium, Gillings, UNC-CH

Dr. Jill Seaman has worked for over 20 years as a physician in South Sudan, specializing in TB and Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) also known as Kala –azar. She has been a local champion for improving health access in conflict situations and is a consultant to the World Health Organization on VL. Dr. Seaman has received a number of prestigious awards for her field work, including a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship in 2009. She was featured in the 2013 National Geographic article on risk-takers This event is co-sponsored by the Carolina Seminar on African Ecology and Social Processes. More info: Sudan Medical Relief and MacArthur Foundation (60 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Ebola and Emerging Infectious Diseases
Presentation and Panel Discussion

Tuesday, September 9, 2014, 5:30-6:45 PM.
Rosenau Hall, Room 133, UNC-CH

Dr. David Jay Weber ( UNC Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine / Prof of Epidemiology at UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health), will moderate a presentation and panel discussion with UNC faculty and experts on the local and global ramifications of the Ebola crisis. The Ebola crisis is a global issue with local and global ramifications. Speakers will share their insights on issues ranging from challenges of managing the crises in the epicenters of the outbreak; state and federal preparedness; global surveillance systems; and access /use of investigational drugs in the current Ebola crises. Speakers include William A. Fisher II, MD(Associate Program Director for Research, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, UNC School of Medicine); Megan Davies, MD ( Epidemiology Section Chief, North Carolina DHHS); and Chris Woods, MD, MPH ( Duke Professor of Medicine and Pathology and Chief of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Durham VA Medical Center). This discussion is sponsored by the UNC Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases. (300 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Mamie Harris Mamie_Harris@med.unc.edu for more information.


Duke-UNC Gender, War and Culture Workshop Series
Workshop: Gender, War and Humanitarianism In the Twentieth Century

Thursday, September 11, 2014, 12 PM - 6 PM.
Hyde Hall, University Room, UNC-CH

This Workshop is part of the Gender, War, and Culture Workshop Series and is titled "Gender, War and Humanitarianism In the Twentieth Century." This workshop centers on ideologies and practices of humanitarianism as they emerged and developed in the wake of nineteenth and twentieth-century nationalism and the wars it spawned. It will address the specific nature of twentieth-century humanitarianism in relation to both the character of war in this period and the rise of internationalist politics at elite and grassroots levels. Speakers at the workshop include Frederick Cooper, Jean Quataert, Ellen Ross, and Glenda Sluga. Detailed Information and Schedule The workshop will be followed by a public lecture by Kristen P. Williams at 6 PM --see separate entry below for details on this talk.   Free.   Please Contact: Karen Hagemann hagemann@unc.edu for more information.


Duke-UNC Gender, War and Culture Series
Public Lecture: Dr. Kristen P. Williams

Thursday, September 11, 2014, 6 PM - 7:30 PM
Hyde Hall, University Room, UNC-CH

Kristen P. Williams, of the Clark University Department of Political Science, will give a talk titled "Gender, War, and Humanitarian Intervention in the 21st Century." This talk will directly follow the related workshop, Gender, War and Humanitarianism in the Twentieth Century, which will be held earlier in the day. Dr. Williams' talk will focus on the two decades since the Cold War ended, when humanitarian crises have continued to plague the international community: Bosnia, DRC, Kosovo, Libya, Rwanda, Sudan, and Syria, to name a few. Calls for humanitarian intervention to protect civilians and alleviate significant human rights violations have been made. Yet, as feminist scholars remind us, humanitarian intervention is highly gendered: decision makers frame intervention as a masculine endeavor in which men are the protectors and women are the protected. This talk will explore several questions: What might a feminist framework for humanitarian intervention and post-war reconstruction processes look like? In what ways do race, ethnicity, and class intersect with gender when examining cases of intervention and peacebuilding? How can the gendered discourse be altered in order to promote gender equality and prioritize women’s needs and concerns during war and after? Moderation: Karen Hagemann, UNC-Chapel Hill, Department of History.   Free.   Please Contact: Karen Hagemann hagemann@unc.edu for more information.


Conference: Lost Futures in the History of European Empires, II
Friday, September 12, 2014 - Sunday, September 14, 2014,
Keynote: Friday 6 PM, Sessions: Sat/Sun
Keynote will be on the NC Central Campus
Saturday/Sunday Sessions: Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This conference is part of the ongoing collaboration between UNC-CH and King’s College London, and follows on the same theme as the conference held in London in 2012. At this year’s event, UNC and KCL faculty and graduate students, along with select participants from other institutions, will make and discuss presentations on such topics as slavery and abolition; transnational anti-colonial, reform, and religious movements; metropolitan visions of racial politics and decolonization; and failure and violence in postcolonial transition. Detailed Information, Conference Schedule, and Registration Pre-registration is required. The renowned Africanist, Frederick Cooper (NYU), will open the conference on Friday, September 12 at North Carolina Central University with the keynote address -- see separate event listing for more details on his talk. The conference organizers also invite participants to attend the related Gender, War and Culture workshop and public lecture held on Sept. 11. (50 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Nancy Schoonmaker nancys@email.unc.edu for more information.


Lost Futures in the History of European Empires, II
Keynote Address: Dr. Frederick Cooper

Friday, September 12, 2014, 6 PM.
H.M. Michaux School of Education Auditorium, NC Central University
712 Cecil Street, Durham, NC

Renowned scholar, Dr. Frederick Cooper (NYU), will present the keynote address for the Lost Futures Conference. His talk will be titled "Anti-Nationalist, Anti-Colonialist Politics in French West Africa: 1945-1960." A reception will follow the event. For more information, please visit http://lostfutures.web.unc.edu/   Free.   Please Contact: Nancy Schoonmaker nancys@email.unc.edu for more information.


Graduate Student Africa Brown Bag Lunch Series
Self-Education in Times of Crisis:
Making Sense of the Ebola Outbreak of 2014

Monday, September 29, 2014, 12:00-1:30 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Join us for the very first Africa Brown Bag Lunch for graduate students. This will be an informal conversation with an African Studies scholar on her approach to self-education on an emerging African issue: the Ebola Outbreak of 2014. Our presenter is Dr. Emily Burrill, of UNC-CH Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. Dr. Burrill is a historian of modern West Africa, but does not work directly on Ebola or Sierra Leone and Liberia. This conversation will address how scholars working on the periphery of issues can use the critical thinking and content tools gleaned from their areas of expertise to learn about new and pressing issues as they unfold quickly on the ground. Burrill will discuss how she applies her knowledge to emerging issues, why it is important to address what she can do and cannot do through self-education, and how she identifies good quality resources for her own self-education and the education of others. Open to all graduate students, from any discipline, with an interest in Africa. Bring your lunch and a friend! Beverages provided. (8 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Democracy in Senegal
Prof. Michael Lambert

Tuesday, September 30, 2014, 4:30 to 6:00 PM.
Flyleaf Books, 752 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd, Chapel Hill

When we think of politics in Africa we most often think of coup d’états and dictatorships. Over the past twenty years, however, there has been a quiet transition to democracy in a number of African nations. Michael Lambert, Associate Professor of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies, Adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director, UNC African Studies Center, will look at how democracy has been realized in one West African nation, Senegal. He will consider the interplay between the government, the press, the youth, and music, especially hip hop, in the making of democracy in this West African nation. All Spotlight on Scholars events take place at Flyleaf Books in Chapel Hill. There are no preparatory readings for these events. Register ahead of time and pay $18.00 per program or pay only $8 if you are a member of the UNC General Alumni Association (GAA). To check your membership status or to join the General Alumni Association, please visit alumni.unc.edu or call 800.962.0742. GAA membership is open to all UNC alumni and friends. Tuition is $20.00 for everyone paying at the door. (33 attendees).   $8, 18, 20.   Please Contact: Flyleaf Books (919) 942-7373 info@flyleafbooks.com for more information.


The Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film
Double Feature

Tuesday, September 30, 2014, 7 PM.
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

Melvin and Jean: An American Story [Dir: Maia Wechsler/Documentary/USA /English/60 min./2012] As a young couple in 1972, the McNairs made news when they hijacked a plane from Detroit to Algeria to join the international section of the Black Panthers. After serving several years in prison in France for the hijacking, the McNairs remained in France and, for 35 years, have lived as model citizens in their adopted country. The second half of the double feature is Jazz Mama [Dir: Petna Ndaliko/Documentary/Congo /French and Lingala with English subtitles/30 min./2010] Demonstrating their incredible strength and their faith in their ability to continue their own advancement, the women featured stand strong in their communities even as they denounce the rape and the violence they experience. (39 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: The Stone Center 962-9001 for more information.



October 2014

Carolina for Kibera 2015 Fellowship Info Session
Wednesday, October 8, 2014, 5 pm
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 1009, UNC-CH

Would you like to travel to East Africa? Are you interested in grassroots participatory development? Apply to Carolina for Kibera's 2015 Fellowship! The fellowship gives UNC students the opportunity to design and implement a sustainable project in Kibera, Kenya, one of the largest slums in Africa. Fellows will devise their projects in conjunction with US and Kenya-based staff in the spring, and will travel to Kibera in the summer to put them into action. To learn more about the fellowship, attend one of our info sessions! (20 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Nick Johnson 919-962-6860 nick@carolinaforkibera.org for more information.


Duke-UNC Gender, War and Culture Series
Public Lecture: Prof. Chérie Rivers Ndaliko

Friday, October 10, 2014, 4 - 6:00 PM
Hyde Hall, University Room, UNC-CH

Chérie Rivers Ndaliko, an Assistant Professor at the UNC Chapel Hill Department of Music, will give a talk titled "'A Look That Kills': Representations of Gender and Sexual Violence in the Current Conflict in Congo." The conflict unfolding in the east of Congo is the deadliest since World War II and is characterized, among other atrocities, by extreme sexual violence. In the last decade, a growing number of Western documentary filmmakers have attempted to alert global audiences to the epidemic of rape as a weapon of war. These films have given rise to a wave of gendered humanitarian interventions that aim to rehabilitate Congolese women victims.This presentation offers a comparative analysis of foreign vs. local depictions of Congolese women. More Information   Free.   Please Contact: Karen Hagemann hagemann@unc.edu for more information.


5th SEALLF Annual Conference
Using language and literature to enhance cultural understanding

Friday, October 10, 2014 - Sunday, October 12, 2014, Friday - Sunday at noon.
University of Georgia, Athens, GA

The Southeast African Language and Literature Forum (SEALLF) invites proposals for panels and papers for the Fifth SEALLF Annual Conference, scheduled for Friday, October 10th through Sunday October 12th 2014 in Athens, GA. The event will be held at the University of Georgia, jointly hosted by the Department of Comparative Literature and African Studies Institute. This year's theme is "Using language and literature to enhance cultural understanding". SEALLF aims to promote the study, teaching, research and overall sustainable development of African languages and literature. It provides a platform for strengthening the teaching of African languages and literature in the southeastern region of the United States. (28 attendees).     Please Contact: Susana Nkurlu snkurlu@uga.edu for more information.


World View K-12 Global Education Symposium
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 - Thursday, October 23, 2014,
22nd - All day, 23rd - Half day.
Friday Center, UNC-CH

This day-and-a-half program explores significant global issues, offers best practices in global education, and provides educators an opportunity to develop an global action plan for their classroom, school, or system. More Information (300 attendees).   Varies.   Please Contact: World View worldview@unc.edu for more information.


Davis Library Research Hub Grand Opening
Thursday, October 23, 2014, 3:30-5 PM.
Davis Library, 2nd Floor, UNC-CH

Join University Librarian Sarah Michalak and Provost Jim Dean to celebrate the grand opening of the Davis Library Research Hub on Oct. 23. The Research Hub makes the entire research lifecycle at UNC more connected, collaborative, and technology-enabled. Data visualization, GIS, digital humanities, and 3D printing are all part of the Hub’s services. Specialized librarians and partners offer training and guidance. During this celebration and open house, members of the UNC community will be able to: Meet Hub librarians and technologists who can work with you, your students, and your research partners; Find inspiration to incorporate new technologies into your research—even if you have never used them before; Take a virtual world tour on the Hub’s panoramic Liquid Galaxy display; Visit remodeled work and presentation spaces, meet Hub partners, and find out about learning opportunities and workshops. RSVP The Research Hub also offers a full calendar of free programs, workshops, lectures, and learning opportunities during the fall semester. Topics include intro to 3D Printing; census, GIS, and data visualization workshops; and copyright consultations. (200 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Mohamed Hamed mseoud@email.unc.edu for more information.


SERSAS/SEAN Fall 2014 Conference
Friday, October 24, 2014 - Saturday, October 25, 2014,
All day Saturday; 3 PM Friday.
College of Charleston, Charleston, SC

The Fall conference of the South East Regional Seminar on African Studies and the Southeast Africanist Network will be held this year in Charleston, SC. Session topics include Maritime Material Culture as a Symbol of Conflict and Reconciliation in Cape Town, SA; conflict, Identity and Borders in East Africa; and Conflict, Repression and the Art of Resilience in Anglophone Cameroon Literature. For more info please visit: http://www.ecu.edu/african/sersas/homepage.htm. (37 attendees).   Contact SERSAS organizers for registration info.   Please Contact: Ken Wilburn wilburnk@ecu.edu for more information.


O.A.S.I.S. GALA
Friday, October 24, 2014, 7 PM - 10 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Atrium, UNC-CH

O.A.S.I.S.' ACTS! Initiative is hosting its Annual GALA at the FedEx Global Education Center, where we dine and dance the night away! There will also be education about the Ebola outbreak. It will definitely be a night to remember. Admission tickets will be sold at the Union Box Office. (135 attendees).   $10 for 1 ticket; $15 for two.   Please Contact: Ntiense Inyang ninyang@live.unc.edu for more information.


Graduate Student Africa Brown Bag Lunch Series
What do African Scholars Bring to African Studies?

Monday, October 27, 2014, 12-1:30 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Join us for our 2nd Africa Brown Bag Lunch for graduate students. Dr. Georges Nzongola-Ntalaja, Professor of African Studies at UNC, will lead a conversation with graduate students on some of the differences in ways that African scholars of Africa approach their research, teaching, and service from that of their American colleagues. What does each contribute to the construction of knowledge and understanding of the continent? What are some of the power dynamics when Americans conduct research in Africa, and what happens when American or European scholars successfully publish research in which African scholars' knowledge, research, and networks were foundational? (9 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


The Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film
Double Feature

Tuesday, October 28, 2014, 7 PM.
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

Concerning Violence: Nine Scenes from the Anti-Imperialist Self-Defense [Dir: Göran Hugo Olsson / Feature / Sweden, USA, Denmark, Finland / English subtitles / 85 min. / 2014] Based on Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth narrated by Lauryn Hill with Preface by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak. A compelling visual narrative about African liberation struggles of the 1960s and 1970s. The second half of the double feature is Agizo Ya Lumumba [Dir: Jobson Katondolo / Short / Congo / English subtitles / 4 min. / 2013] On 17 January, 1961, Patrice Emory Lumumba was assassinated by a regimes of domination and greed. On 17 January, 2014 we remember him as a hero of our regime of peace and empowerment. Agizo ya Lumumba was recorded during SKIFF 2013 in a workshop by Petna Ndaliko. (47 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: The Stone Center 962-9001 for more information.


Carolina Seminar
Documenting the History of Humanitarian Crises:
Methods from Doctors Without Borders

Thursday, October 30, 2014, 6:30 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Please join us for a dinner lecture featuring Laurence Binet, Director of Studies, Fondation MSF and internal historian for Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). For over twenty years, Ms. Binet has been sifting through the organization's archives, unearthing and documenting the various bits of evidence that help tell the story of some of MSF's most difficult contexts and dilemmas. Her in-depth research had been compiled into the Speaking Out Case Studies series, which provides primary source evidence of decisions taken by the group during critical moments such as the Ethiopian famine, Rwanda and Zaire during and after the genocide, Somalia in the early 1990s, and others. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. Light dinner is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. (25 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


The Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film
Double Feature

Thursday, October 30, 2014, 7 PM.
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

Something Necessary [Dir:Judy Kibinge /Feature/Kenya/Swahili with English subtitles /85 min./2013] After the unrest surrounding the 2007 elections in Kenya, Anne (Susan Wanjiru) awakens in a hospital bed to discover her young son in a coma, her husband dead at the hands of marauding thugs, and their farm, The Haven, ransacked and desecrated by the mobs that attacked, beat, and even killed thousands of innocent Kenyans. Second half of the double feature is Sweet, Sweet Country [Dir:Dehanza Rogers /Short/USA/English/19 min./2013] Living in a small Southern town, 20-year-old refugee Ndizeye struggles to support herself, and the family she left behind in a Kenyan refugee camp. Her burden grows when her family shows up at her doorstep.   Free.   Please Contact: The Stone Center 962-9001 for more information.



November 2014

Carolina for Kibera 2015 Fellowship Info Session
Monday, November 3, 2014, 5 pm
Fedex Global Education Center. Room 1009, UNC-CH

Would you like to travel to East Africa? Are you interested in grassroots participatory development? Apply to Carolina for Kibera's 2015 Fellowship! The fellowship gives UNC students the opportunity to design and implement a sustainable project in Kibera, Kenya, one of the largest slums in Africa. Fellows will devise their projects in conjunction with US and Kenya-based staff in the spring, and will travel to Kibera in the summer to put them into action. To learn more about the fellowship, attend one of our info sessions! (21 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Nick Johnson 919-962-6860 nick@carolinaforkibera.org for more information.


Carolina for Kibera 2015 Fellowship Info Session
Wednesday, November 12, 2014, 5 pm
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 1009, UNC-CH

Would you like to travel to East Africa? Are you interested in grassroots participatory development? Apply to Carolina for Kibera's 2015 Fellowship! The fellowship gives UNC students the opportunity to design and implement a sustainable project in Kibera, Kenya, one of the largest slums in Africa. Fellows will devise their projects in conjunction with US and Kenya-based staff in the spring, and will travel to Kibera in the summer to put them into action. To learn more about the fellowship, attend one of our info sessions! (18 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Nick Johnson 919-962-6860 nick@carolinaforkibera.org for more information.


The Mint Museum Symposium & Exhibit on Arts in Africa
Saturday, November 15, 2014, 10:00 AM - 5:30 PM
The Mint Museum in Charlotte, NC

The symposium accompanies the exhibition Arts of Africa, which includes objects from the museum’s permanent collection along with loans from several private individuals, with a significant number drawn from the collection of Michael Gallis of Charlotte. It also marks the publication of a new catalogue titled Art in the Many Africas. Presentations By Leading Scholars of African Art: Dr. Herbert M. Cole, professor emeritus, University of California, Santa Barbara; Dr. Akinwumi Ogundiran, UNC Charlotte; Dr. Henry John Drewal, University of Wisconsin; Dr. Cécile Fromont, University of Chicago; and Dr. Victoria Rovine, UNC Chapel Hill. Followed By: Egungun masquerade by Oyotunji African Village Yoruba performers from Sheldon, S.C.   Pre-registration required: mintmuseum.org/ha   Please Contact: Alexandra Olivares 704.337.2107 for more information.


FLAS Info Sessions
Monday, November 17, 2014, Noon-1:00 PM; and 2-3:00 PM
Noon Session: Law School, Room 4082 UNC-CH;
2:00 Session: Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2015-2016 Academic Year, and Summer 2015 will be due January 30, 2015. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. The remaining info sessions include Nov. 18 and Nov. 19. (session 1, 12 attendees; session 2, 15 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Sessions
Tuesday, November 18, 2014, Noon-1:00 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2015-2016 Academic Year, and Summer 2015 will be due January 30, 2015. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. The remaining session will be on Nov. 19. (7 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Sessions
Wednesday, November 19, 2014, 1-2:00 PM.
Carroll Hall, JOMC, Hall of Fames Room, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2015-2016 Academic Year, and Summer 2015 will be due January 30, 2015. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. (12 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Doctors Without Borders in North Carolina:
Access to the Danger Zone Film

Wednesday, November 19, 2014, 7 - 8:30 PM
Varsity Theatre, 123 E. Franklin St., Chapel Hill

Directed by Peter Casaer and narrated by Daniel Day-Lewis, this documentary provides a harrowing look at the challenges of delivering humanitarian aid in armed conflicts. Over 70 minutes, Access to the Danger Zone explores the strategies that Doctors Without Borders uses to save lives in the world’s worst war zones, including Afghanistan, Somalia, and eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Interviews with key experts from Doctors Without Borders, the International Committee of the Red Cross, and the United Nations are accompanied by dramatic footage shot in these countries in 2011 and 2012. Join us following the screening for a Q&A with local Doctors Without Borders aid workers, who will share stories from their overseas assignments. More Info   Free.   Please Contact: Doctors Without Borders 888-392-0392 for more information.


FLAS INFO SESSIONS
Thursday, November 20, 2014, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Peabody, Room 204, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2015-2016 Academic Year, and Summer 2015 will be due January 30, 2015. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. Please keep in mind that this session will be the last session held in the Fall of 2014. (20 attendees).   FREE.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants are Building a New Empire in Africa
Friday, November 21, 2014, 2:00 PM-3:30 PM
Nelson Mandela Auditorium

This interesting talk concerning the rise of China's new empire in Africa is given by Howard French, who received his B.A. from the University of Massachusetts – Amherst. He worked as a French-English translator in Abidjan, Ivory Coast in the early 1980s, and taught English literature at the University of Ivory Coast. His career in journalism began as a freelance reporter for The Washington Post and many other publications in West Africa. He was hired by The New York Times in 1986, and worked as a metropolitan reporter for three years, and from 1990 to 2008 reported for The Times as bureau chief for Central America and the Caribbean, West Africa, Japan and the Koreas, and China in Shanghai. During this time, his work was twice nominated for the Pulitzer Prize; he was twice the recipient of an Overseas Press Club Award, and he has also won the Grantham Environmental Award, among other awards. (52 attendees).   FREE.   Please Contact: Morgan Pitelka mpitelka@unc.edu for more information.



February 2015

SERSAS/SEAN Conference
Journeys of Reconciliation:
The New South, the New South Africa, and Nelson Mandela

Friday, February 6, 2015 - Saturday, February 7, 2015,
Fedex Global Education Center, Atrium, UNC-CH

The South Eastern Regional Seminar on African Studies (SERSAS) and the Southeast Africanist Network (SEAN) will hold their annual conference. The theme for the conference will be "Journeys of Reconciliation: The New South, the New South Africa, and Nelson Mandela," and papers on other regions will also be presented. The joint SERSAS/SEAN conference prides itself on providing a collegial and welcoming atmosphere, and we are particularly interested in supporting emerging scholars. The program includes a welcome reception starting at 6 PM followed by a keynote address given by Dr. Hunt Davis, Professor Emeritus at the University of Florida, at 7 PM on Friday night, and a full program of papers on Saturday, 8:30 AM - 5 PM.  Registration is required.   Program    Info and Registration (52 attendees).   $30 faculty, $20 students   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall (919) 962-1522 sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


William (Willie) Hofmeyr:  CANCELLED
Nelson Mandela Lunch Panel Discussion Series

Monday, February 9, 2015, 12PM-1PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELED
Hoffmeyr will take part in the Nelson Mandela Lunch Panel Discussion Series. Before his current position, Hofmeyr was active in the liberation movement and served as a member of parliament for the African National Congress (ANC). He was one of the key organizers of the welcome rally for the release of Nelson Mandela. He then worked for the ANC coordinating election campaign events. He was later elected to the South African Parliament (Congress) and then appointed to his current position. Hofmeyr will speak on Mandela and his role in the negotiations that brought freedom to South Africa, and discuss some of the major strategic issues he and the ANC faced and how they were dealt with, as well as how they handled winning the confidence of the previous government while maintaining the trust of ordinary people. Lunch will be provided and advance registration is required. More Info .   FREE.   Please Contact: Ingrid Smith 919-962-0299 ingrid.smith@unc.edu for more information.


****CANCELED****
Carolina Seminar
Culture through Objects: Africa's Art History
Prof. Victoria L. Rovine

Thursday, February 26, 2015, 12:15 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Prof. Rovine specializes in African art with a focus on African textiles and dress practices, and on Africa’s presence in Western visual culture. Her talk is sponsored by the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. A light meal is served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



March 2015

The Lights and the Follies:
Africa's Historical Ecologies of Climate Change and Watersheds
Prof. James McCann

Thursday, March 5, 2015, 5:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 1005, UNC-CH

Sub-Saharan Africa in now in the midst of two massive sets of changes in it hydrology. The first consists of the planning and building of hydroelectic/irrigation dam projects on its river systems (the Congo, the Zambezi, the Blue Nile, the Volta, and the While Nile). The second "wave" will be the expected regional and global climate changes that will have distinctive effects on Africa and its hydrologies. Prof. James McCann will speak on the implications of these projects for the future. (30 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Terry Tamari ttamari@unc.edu for more information.


UNC World View
The Modern Middle East Seminar

Wednesday, March 25, 2015 - Thursday, March 26, 2015, All day.
The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education, UNC-CH

Participants will have a chance to explore pressing issues affecting the Middle East today, as well as historical information to help contextualize the modern Middle East. Sessions on topics such as the arts, religion, health and medicine, and more will be offered with strategies to help educators teach their students about the Middle East. These two seminars are for all educators of every grade-level and discipline. Includes lectures from author Krista Bremer, communications strategist Jessica Devaney, professor of political science at Appalachian State University Curtis Ryan, and professor and director of Duke Islamic Studies Center Omid Safi. More Info (125 attendees).   $175 for one seminar and $325 for both.   Please Contact: UNC World View worldview@unc.edu for more information.


Introduction to Malawi:
A Workshop on Chichewa Language and Malawi Culture

Thursday, March 26, 2015, 5:30-7:30 PM
Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Beard Hall, Room 102, UNC-CH

This four-part workshop will focus on introductory Chichewa greetings and linguistics, medical interview vocabulary, and cultural sensitivity in health services for UNC students, staff and faculty planning research, service or internships in Malawi. Workshop sessions cover elementary language construction, health and cultural training, as well as brief presentations on the history, geography, politics and economy of Malawi. Participants will be provided soft copies of readings and basic language material. Dinner will be provided. Attendance at a minimum of 3 sessions is required. Meeting dates are Thursdays - March 26th, April 2nd, April 9th & April 16th. Space is limited - please register by emailing Mamie Harris at malawi@unc.edu. This workshop is sponsored by the UNC Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases and the UNC African Studies Center. (20 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Mamie Harris malawi@unc.edu for more information.



April 2015

Celebrating Congo -- A Public Forum
Wednesday, April 1, 2015, 5 PM
Gerrard Hall, UNC-CH

In collaboration with UNC’s Music Department, Carolina Performing Arts brings three of Congo’s most exciting artists to Chapel Hill for a weeklong residency exploring the profound humanity, spirit, and artistic allure of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Eclectic world music pianist/ composer Ray Lema, leading African dancer/choreographer Faustin Linyekula, and internationally acclaimed filmmaker/activist Petna Ndaliko Katondolo will engage in micro-performances, installations, and public conversations navigating Congo’s vibrant living traditions through sound, movement, and image. The resulting forum will offer audiences a unique opportunity to take part in the development of an exhilarating work in progress that may culminate in a future Carolina Performing Arts-commissioned performance. What does home feel like for an artist from Congo? What will it mean for a child who is born in Congo today? Each artist offers unique perspectives and talents to explore and share their responses to what it means to be from Congo. In this forum, they invite the Carolina community to come together in a celebration and discussion of their work. They will share how their time in Chapel Hill has shaped their thoughts on some of these most important questions facing an artist from Congo or any other country. (90 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Chérie Ndaliko ndaliko@email.unc.edu for more information.


William Murphy Lecture on Civil Rights
Judge Thokozile Masipa

Monday, April 6, 2015, 12:00pm
UNC School of Law, Rotunda, UNC-CH

The Honorable Thokozile Masipa is a judge in the Gauteng Division of the High Court of South Africa. She assumed office December 1, 1998 under the appointment of President Nelson Mandela. (75 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Ken Broun ksbroun@email.unc.edu for more information.


Transforming Judiciaries in the Global South:
Lessons from the Kenyan Judiciary
Dr. Willy Mutunga

Monday, April 6, 2015, 5:30pm
Fedex Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

The Honorable Chief Justice, Dr. Willy M. Mutunga, was appointed to the Kenyan Supreme Court on June 22, 2011. Dr. Mutunga has established and served in many civil society organizations, such as the Legal Advice Centre (Kituo Cha Sheria). For his contribution to the development of law, human rights, good governance and social justice, Dr. Mutunga has received several national and international honors and awards including: Elder of the Golden Heart for his distinguished service to the nation and for his role in leading reforms in the Judiciary under the new Constitution (2012) and appointment as Senior Counsel, Government of Kenya (2003). He has co-edited and co-authored several books and published two books: The Rights of Arrested and Accused Persons and Constitution-Making from the Middle: Civil Society and Transition Politics in Kenya, 1992-1997 and several published essays and papers on human rights, law and society. (100 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Eunice Sahle eunice@email.unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar
Somalia's Global Civil War
A Story of How Farmers Become Refugees
Dr. Catherine Besteman

Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 12:30 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Tracking the historical antecedents of the collapse of the Somali state and the ensuing genocidal violence in the Jubba Valley reveals how the story of Somalia's civil war is really one of global connections and interventions. Somalia is a case study of how Africa's violence is intimately connected with global geopolitics, actors, and desires. Anthropologist Catherine Besteman (Colby College) has studied Somalia for 25 years, first as a field researcher in Somalia prior to the onset of the civil war in 1991 and currently with Somali refugees in the US. Her book about the Somali Bantu diaspora, called Making Refuge, is forthcoming from Duke University Press. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. A light meal will be served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. (12 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


3rd Annual Global Africana Conference
Education, Freedom, and Democracy

Friday, April 10, 2015, Times listed below.
Wilson Library, Pleasants Family Room, UNC-CH

All Panels : 9:00am – 5:00pm, Pleasants Room Wilson Library. Keynote Lecture given by Dr. Shaun R. Harper in the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Cultural and History Auditorium, 7pm. The lecture will be preceded by a student performance, “Pathways and Pipelines,” at 6pm -6:45pm. (45 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Sonia Colon scolon@email.unc.edu for more information.


Namibian Democracy: 25 Years After Independence
The 2015 Douglass Hunt Lecture

Monday, April 13, 2015, Reception: 4:30 PM Panel: 5:00 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

The UNC-Chapel Hill community will welcome special guests to honor the 25th anniversary of Namibian independence. Panelists will include Political Counsellor for the Namibian Embassy Helena Gray, founder of The Namibian and chairperson of the Namibia Media Trust Gwen Lister and Cassandra Butts, UNC ’87, senior advisor to the U.S. Millennium Challenge Corporation and the United States Ambassador-Designate to the Bahamas. This 2015 Douglass Hunt Lecture is organized by the Carolina Seminars Program. Speakers will share their reflections on Namibian history, politics and the process of democratization. Speakers will discuss and share their reflections on Namibian history, politics and the process of democratization and the role of student activism (at UNC and elsewhere) in solidarity with the Namibian independence movement. Visit Overview (43 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Lisa Quarles 919-962-2501 equarles@email.unc.edu for more information.



August 2015

International Coffee Hour
Tuesday, August 25, 2015, 5-6 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, EspressOasis Cafe, UNC-CH

Join us for the monthly social hour to bring together international UNC community members and students excited about global engagement. Chat about opportunities and challenges on campus. Meet staff from the Center for Global Initiatives and Study Abroad offices with great resources to share. Refreshments, including EspressOasis coffee, will be provided.   Free.   Please Contact: Center for Global Initiatives cgi@unc.edu. for more information.



September 2015

Carolina Seminar
Same-Sex Intimacies in an Early Modern African Text
about an Ethiopian Female Saint, Gädlä Wälättä P̣eṭros (1672)
Prof. Wendy Laura Belcher, Princeton University

Tuesday, September 1, 2015, 12:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

The seventeenth-century Ethiopian book The Life and Struggles of Our Mother Walatta Petros (Gädlä Wälättä P̣eṭros) features a life-long partnership between two women and the depiction of same-sex sexuality among nuns. The earliest known book-length biography about the life of an African woman, written in 1672 in the Gəˁəz language, Gädlä Wälättä Ṗeṭros is an extraordinary account of early modern African women’s lives—full of vivid dialogue, heartbreak, and triumph. It features revered Ethiopian religious leader Wälättä P̣eṭros (1592-1642), who led a nonviolent movement against European proto-colonialism in Ethiopia in a successful fight to retain African Christian beliefs, for which she was elevated to sainthood in the Ethiopian Orthodox Täwaḥədo Church. An important part of the text is her friendship with another nun, Ǝḫətä Krəstos, as they “lived together in mutual love, like soul and body” until death. Interpreting the women’s relationships in this Ethiopian text requires care, but queer theory provides useful warnings, framing, and interpretive tools. The talk emerges out of Prof. Belcher’s work with Michael Kleiner to translate the text, which will be published in September 2015 by Princeton University Press as The Life and Struggles of Our Mother Walatta Petros: A Seventeenth-Century African Biography of an Ethiopian Woman. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. A light meal will be served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. (14 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar
In the Name of the People: Angola's Forgotten Massacre
Lara Pawson

Wednesday, September 23, 2015, 12:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Writer and journalist Lara Pawson will discuss her critically-acclaimed book, In the Name of the People: Angola's Forgotten Massacre (I.B. Tauris, 2014). The book tells the story of Pawson's experience uncovering, researching, and coming to terms with a 1977 massacre that took place in Angola at the hands of the ruling party. The book is a fast-paced account of Pawson's experience researching an event that has been covered up – and the ethical, political, and moral challenges that come with writing about an event that cuts against the grain of dominant narratives of African independence and histories of liberation. Lara Pawson was the BBC correspondent in Angola from 1998-2000. She also reported from Ivory Coast, Mali, Sao Tome e Principe, and later worked as the London desk reporter, all for the BBC Africa Service. She holds both a bachelor's degree and a master's degree from SOAS in London. From 2007-2008, she was a Writing Fellow at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. She is now working on a novel. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. A light meal will be served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. (24 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Peace Film Series
Living in Emergency Film Screening

Friday, September 25, 2015, 5:30 PM
UNC School of Social Work, Tate-Turner-Kuralt Auditorium, UNC-CH

Filmed in the war-zones of Liberia and Congo with unprecedented access to the field operations of Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), Living in Emergency follows four volunteer doctors as they struggle to provide emergency medical care under extreme conditions. This film is an excellent opportunity to consider humanitarianism in the context of war and conflict. Following the screening of the film, there will be a short discussion session with UNC professor, Peter Redfield and Rotary Peace Fellow, Jean Lambert Chalachala. (45 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Amy Cole 919-843-4887 coleac@live.unc.edu for more information.


Family Weekend 2015:
Global Opportunities 101 Reception

Friday, September 25, 2015, 5-6:30 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Florence and James Peacock Atrium, UNC-CH

Global experience is key to landing your dream job in our increasingly global world. Stop by the FedEx Global Education Center to learn about the range of high-impact, safe and affordable opportunities available to you at Carolina to give you the experience you’ll need to take your education and career to the next level. Enjoy refreshments and connect with Carolina students, staff and faculty who’ve had a variety of global experiences all over the map. Come learn how Carolina brings the world to you and you to the world. This event is organized by the Center for Global Initiatives and Global Relations. (100 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Ingrid Smith 919-962-0299 ingrid.smith@unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Global Photography Competition
Wednesday, September 30, 2015, All day
Fedex Global Education Center

The academic year 2015-2016 Carolina Global Photo Competition, which is open to all students, faculty, alumni and staff of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, showcases Carolina’s global activity, educational opportunities, research and service work. Each photographer may submit up to three photos. Photos may represent any world region and there is no restriction on the period in which the photograph was taken. Entries will be judged on artistic merit and context. Special consideration will be given to images that are distinctive and embrace new perspectives. Grand prizes will be awarded to first, second and third place. In addition, Honorable Mentions will be awarded to photos that embrace our various themes. Photos will be exhibited in the Fedex Global Education Center from January 2016 through May 2016. More info. (60 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Beth-Ann Kutchma bkutchma@unc.edu for more information.



October 2015

Fashion Design in South Africa:
Reworking Histories through Clothing
Prof. Victoria Rovine

Thursday, October 1, 2015, 12-1:30 PM
Friedl Building, Room 225, Duke East Campus

South Africa's fashion industry is remarkably vibrant and diverse. Using the work of several designers, this presentation explores the use of fashion to express and investigate the nation's histories. The designers represent a wide array of approaches to South Africa's past; some make direct reference to historical styles and their associations, while others create abstractions that evoke rather than depict shared memories. Whatever their approach, these designers demonstrate that fashion has expressive potential that belies its reputation for frivolity. A light lunch will be served.     Please Contact: av71@duke.edu for more information.


*** CANCELLED ***
Making Democracy Real: Fall 2015 SERSAS Conference

Friday, October 2, 2015 - Saturday, October 3, 2015, All day.
College of Charleston, Charleston SC

The Fall 2015 SERSAS Conference invites participants to offer analysis not of the state in general but of the degree to which African nations have been able to realize promises of democracy. Since the end of the Cold War and since the first full democratic elections in South Africa in 1994 many African nations have moved toward multi-party democracy--the recent election in Nigeria is a case in point. At the same time, however, some of the movements toward democracy following the "Arab Spring" have been stifled, and long-time rulers such as Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe, Teodoro Obiang of Equatorial Guinea, or Paul Biya of Cameroon are well into their fourth decade of rule. Civil War and warlordism also remain factors thwarting civil society. This Fall's SERSAS Conference will host Professor Laura Bier, Associate Professor History at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Dr. Bier is a social and cultural historian with a specialty in post-colonial Egyptian history. Her book _Revolutionary Womanhood: Feminisms, Modernity, and the State in Nasser's Egypt_ was published by Stanford University Press in 2011, and her blog "Revolutionary Womanhood" features her analysis of contemporary Egypt especially in relation to gender and the Arab Spring. Please send proposals of no more than 300 words that outline the main themes and issues of your paper to: Simon Lewis: lewiss@cofc.edu; Tim Carmichael: carmichaelt@cofc.edu; Christopher Day: dayc@cofc.edu. Deadline for submissions is: 7 September 2015.     Please Contact: Kenneth Wilburn WILBURNK@ecu.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar
Why It Matters: Studying Fashion Design in Africa
Prof. Victoria L. Rovine

Thursday, October 8, 2015, 12:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Prof. Rovine specializes in African art with a focus on African textiles and dress practices, and on Africa’s presence in Western visual culture. Her book, African Fashion, Global Style: Histories, Innovations, and Ideas You Can Wear provides a richly revealing look at fashion, international networks of style, material culture, and the world of African aesthetic expression. Prof. Rovine will open the talk with an overview of her research and career trajectory, which has moved between natural history and art museums, and teaching positions in Art History and African Studies programs. This element of the presentation may be of particular interest to students who are considering museum careers. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. A light meal will be served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. (41 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Armstrong Plays Kinshasa:
Jazz, Writing, and Race in Francophone African Contexts
Prof. Pim Higginson

Friday, October 23, 2015, 10 AM - 1 PM
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

Pim Higginson, Professor of French and Francophone Studies at Bryn Mawr College, is a comparatist who works in 20th century French and Francophone literature. He is interested in the relationship between music and literature and, particularly, in the nexus between this relationship and the construction of race.     Please Contact: Dominique Fisher domfisc@email.unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Sessions
Tuesday, October 27, 2015, 2 PM
Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2016-2017 Academic Year, and Summer 2016 will be due January 29, 2016. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. The remaining info sessions include Oct. 28, Nov. 16, and Nov. 17. (18 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Sessions
Wednesday, October 28, 2015, 9 AM
Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2016-2017 Academic Year, and Summer 2016 will be due January 29, 2016. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. The remaining info sessions include Nov. 16 and Nov. 17. (8 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



November 2015

Peace Film Series
Without a Fight Film Screening

Monday, November 2, 2015, 5:30 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

Without a Fight is a feature length documentary film that explores how soccer can facilitate social change in Kibera, one of Africa's largest slums. Footage of violent clashes fueled by polarizing national presidential elections is intertwined with profiles of youth from different religious and ethnic backgrounds as they navigate daily life and prepare for the final championship soccer game of the season. The film provides a glimpse-often a very positive one-into an Africa few have seen. It attempts to break stereotypes associated with people who live in extreme poverty while depicting sports as a tool that could be used to prevent violence among at-risk youth. Following the screening of the film, there will be a short discussion session with Rye Barcott and Osborn Kwena. (47 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Amy Cole 919-843-4887 coleac@live.unc.edu for more information.


The Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Films
Lucky

Tuesday, November 3, 2015, 7 PM
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

Lucky [Dir. Avie Luthra/Feature/South Africa/English/100 min./2014]. How could a recently orphaned, 10-year old homeless South African boy ever be called Lucky? Over the grave of his dead mother, Lucky makes a promise to make something of himself. Leaving the security of his remote Zulu village for the big city with the hope of going to school, he arrives at the doorstep of an uncle who has no use for him. Lucky then falls in with Padme, and elderly Indian woman with an inherent fear of Africans, who takes him in as she would a stray dog. Together, unable to speak each other's language, they develop an unlikely bond. Through an odyssey marked by greed, violence, and ultimately, belonging, Lucky shows how a child's spirit can bring out decency, humility and even love in adults struggling to survive in the new South Africa.   Free.   Please Contact: Stone Center 919-962-9001 stonecenter@unc.edu for more information.


Public Service: Careers in Federal Government
Randy B. Cheek

Thursday, November 5, 2015, 2-3 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Mr. Randy Cheek has spent nearly 30 years of government service working primarily to promote strategic planning and inter-agency coordination from a non-traditional security perspective. His specific area of interest is Africa, with non-traditional threats to security a major focus. His career has included the State Department, the Department of Defense, the National Defense University, and the Bureau of African Affairs, International Security Affairs. Mr. Cheek has worked closely with the United Nations, the European Union, the African Union, African regional organizations and numerous African governments. He has lectured at the National Defense Colleges of South Africa, Botswana, Zambia and Kenya. He currently consults with various US and international interests focusing on Africa and lectures frequently to academic, government, and business groups. (10 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Global Opportunities Info Fair
Thursday, November 5, 2015, 4 - 6 PM
Carolina Union, Great Hall, UNC-CH

Talk one-on-one with UNC staff, faculty, and student organization members about all the global opportunities you can find on campus, through courses, and even travel abroad! Representatives will be there to tell you more about the global events they host on campus, volunteer and service learning opportunities of global relevance, or help you through one of the stages of global opportunity: finding options, applying for funding, and connecting the experience back to the community. Refreshments will be provided. Whether you haven’t gotten your passport yet, or have almost filled it up, we want to see you there! (120 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Bevin Tighe 919-962-3094 bevin@unc.edu for more information.


Making Public in a Privatized World
The Struggle for Essential Services in Urban Africa
Prof. David McDonald

Thursday, November 5, 2015, 5-6:15 PM
Hanes Art Center, Room 0121, UNC-CH

After three decades of privatization the world is witnessing a dramatic return to public services. From the remunicipalization of water in Argentina, to community-based health monitoring in India, to the democratization of electricity provision in Tunisia, there has been a tidal wave of innovative (if sometimes contradictory) forms of 'making public.' This talk reviews global trends and discussed how - and if - public services are being remade in cities in sub-Saharan Africa, where the trend has been slower to take off, where resistance to democratized forms of service governance have been strong, and where the challenges of infrastructure deficits are enormous. What lessons are to be learned from Asia and Latin America in this regard, and how might African social movements build a stronger urban pro-public movement? (75 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stephanie Fore 919-966-1295 sfore@email.unc.edu for more information.


Carolina Seminar
Research Resources Open House
Mohamed Hamed and Mireille Djenno

Tuesday, November 10, 2015, 12 - 1:30 PM
Davis Library, Room 214, UNC-CH

As part of the African Studies Center's seminar, UNC African Studies Librarians Mohamed Hamed and Mireille Djenno will welcome African Studies students, faculty and staff to a research resources open house. The open house will feature new UNC research resources and acquisitions, including the Research Hub, a convergence of specialist librarians, technologists and other campus partners, that has much to offer those engaged in African Studies. A panel of subject specialist librarians will also be on hand to answer questions, and a tour of the Research Hub will be offered. This talk is part of the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. A light meal will be served. Open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. (14 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


The Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Films
Njinga: Queen of Angola

Tuesday, November 10, 2015, 7 PM
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

Njinga: Queen of Angola [Dir. Sergio Graciano/Feature/Angola/Portuguese with English subtitles/109 min./2013]. In 17th century Angola, a woman leads her kingdom in a 40-year struggle for freedom and independence. Her name is Njinga. She will be known as Queen Njinga. Born into a patriarchal society, Njinga defied tradition to become queen at the age of 50 with the aim of ensuring her people were kept safe from Portuguese slave traders. A true story of unrivaled determination, Njinga stands today as a symbol of resistance, fully embodying the motto: "those who fight, fight to win".   Free.   Please Contact: Stone Center 919-962-9001 stonecenter@unc.edu for more information.


An Evening with Christo Brand
Wednesday, November 11, 2015, 7:30 PM
The Friday Center

Christo Brand was born the son of a farm foreman in South Africa’s Western Cape. He spent his early years knowing little about the cruel Apartheid regime that prevailed elsewhere in the country. Conscripted to the military at age eighteen, Brand elected not to join the notoriously brutal police or army. He trained instead as a prison guard and was assigned to Robben Island to guard the most dangerous men in South Africa—Nelson Mandela and his fellow revolutionaries. Against all odds, Brand and Mandela formed a lasting friendship. Brand recounts his experiences with Mandela in his 2014 book Mandela: My Prisoner, My Friend. To register, call or email the Friday Center. (284 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Friday Center 919-962-3000 fridaycenter@unc.edu for more information.


UNC World View
2015 Community College Symposium:
Global Human Rights and Social Justice

Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - Thursday, November 12, 2015, All day
The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education

Our Community College Global Education Symposium is held each November in Chapel Hill, NC. This program explores significant global issues, offers best practices in global education, and provides educators an opportunity to incorporate global components into the curriculum. The 2015 community college symposium will focus on global human rights and social justice. Registration required. More information. (87 attendees).   $175 per person   Please Contact: UNC World View 919-962-9264 worldview@unc.edu for more information.


The Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Films
Virgin Margarida

Thursday, November 12, 2015, 7 PM
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

Virgin Margarida [Dir. Licinio Azevedo/Feature/Mozambique, France, Portugal/French, Portuguese with English subtitles/90 min./2012]. Set in Mozambique in 1975 in the immediate aftermath of the country's war of independence, Virgin Margarida is a restrained and thought-provoking film that tells the story of a group of female sex workers who are captured by revolutionary soldiers and sent deep into the countryside to be 're-educated'. Although Maria João, the officer in charge of the program, is driven by idealistic notions, she is perfectly willing to subject her prisoners to torture. In spite of their suffering, members of the captured group of women take it upon themselves to look out for Margarida, a 16 year-old girl who stands falsely accused of prostitution and transpires to be a virgin.   Free.   Please Contact: Stone Center 919-962-9001 stonecenter@unc.edu for more information.


Opening Access to Global Learning
Jaclyn Gilstrap (Center for Global Initiatives)
Rodney Vargas (Study Abroad Office)

Friday, November 13, 2015, 12-1:30 PM
Hanes Hall, Room 239, UNC-CH

Studies show that global learning opportunities are high impact experiences that can significantly impact college student success. However, there are often real and perceived barriers to accessing opportunities for global learning for first generation, transfer, low-income, and underrepresented students. The Center for Global Initiatives and the Study Abroad Office have employed intentional strategies to open access for all students at Carolina. This session will describe their efforts and engage participants in discussion about how to market global learning opportunities and support student access in our daily work. Part of the Brown Bag Lunch Series on the Crossroads of Student Success: Academics, Wellness and Engagement. There will be lunch. (20 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Candice Powell candicef@email.unc.edu for more information.


International Education Week
Monday, November 16, 2015 - Friday, November 20, 2015,
UNC-CH

International Education Week (IEW) is an initiative sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and U.S. Department of Education. Celebrated in over 100 nations, IEW aims to promote the benefits of international education, foster international understanding, and create support for international education exchange programs. IEW has been celebrated annually since 2000. This year, events will take place the week of November 16-20. More information can be found on the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs’ website.     Please Contact: Katie Bowler Young 919-962-4504 kby@unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Sessions
Monday, November 16, 2015, 3 PM
Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2016-2017 Academic Year, and Summer 2016 will be due January 29, 2016. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. The remaining info session will be on Nov. 17. (13 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Sessions
Tuesday, November 17, 2015, 10 AM
Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2016-2017 Academic Year, and Summer 2016 will be due January 29, 2016. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. (7 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Association of African Studies Programs
Fall 2015 Meeting

Thursday, November 19, 2015 - Sunday, November 22, 2015, All day
Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marina; San Diego, California

The AASP is an organization made up of the Deans, Directors, Chairpersons, Committee Heads, or individuals who have the responsibility for organizing or leading the African Studies program at their college or university. Members range from Directors of the large Title VI centers to colleagues who keep the flame of African Studies alive in quite isolated settings. The Association of African Studies Programs Fall Meeting will be held during the African Studies Association Annual Meeting.     Please Contact: African Studies Association 848-445-8173 members@africanstudies.org for more information.


58th Annual Meeting of the African Studies Association
The State and the Study of Africa

Thursday, November 19, 2015 - Sunday, November 22, 2015, All day
Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marina; San Diego, California

The African Studies Association Annual Meeting is the largest gathering of Africanist scholars in the world, with an attendance of about 2,000 scholars and professionals. The conference offers more than 300 panels and roundtables, plenary events featuring keynote speakers, awards ceremony and dance party, institutional and organizational receptions and meetings, an international exhibit hall, and screenings of award-winning movies from Africa, and/or by African producers. More information. (2000 attendees).     Please Contact: African Studies Association 848-445-8173 members@africanstudies.org for more information.



January 2016

****CANCELED***
Histories of Slavery and Domination in West Africa
A Roundtable Discussion

Friday, January 22, 2016, 12:00 PM.
Hyde Hall, University Room, UNC-CH

A roundtable discussion will be held featuring three distinguished scholars of West African history. Prof. Bruce Hall, Associate Professor of History at Duke University is a scholar and teacher of race, slavery, and Islam in Timbuktu and the Sahel region of West and North Africa. Prof. Ibrahima Thioub is Professor of History and Rector of l’Université Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar, Sénégal. He is a scholar and teacher of the history of slavery, bondage, colonial incarceration and punishment in the Senegambian region of West Africa. Prof. Lisa Lindsay is the Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Associate Professor of History at UNC-Chapel Hill. She is a scholar and teacher of Nigerian history and trans-Atlantic slavery. This event is sponsored by the UNC African Studies Center and UNC Department of History. Flyer Brown bag lunch is encouraged.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Art Versus Aid in African Conflict
Prof. Chérie Rivers Ndaliko

Wednesday, January 27, 2016, 6:30 PM.
Graham Memorial Building, Room 011, UNC-CH

Chérie Rivers Ndaliko is an interdisciplinary scholar who studies radical arts interventions in conflict regions of Africa through ethnomusicology, film studies and cultural theory. Her work centers on film and music as catalysts of movements of socio-political transformation as well as on the ethics and aesthetics of humanitarian aid in the east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In this context she devotes particular attention to youth and gender politics. She is also a composer and pianist who holds a bachelor’s of music in film scoring from the Berklee College of Music, a master’s degree from Harvard University in ethnomusicology and a doctorate from Harvard University in African studies. This event is presented as part of the Food for Thought lecture series by Honors Carolina.   Free.   Please Contact: Honors Carolina 919.966.5110 for more information.


The Age of Discovery:
Knowledge and the Postcolonial Politics of Land Management in Mozambique
Prof. Wendy Wolford

Friday, January 29, 2016, 3:35 - 5:00 PM
Carolina Hall, Room 320, UNC-CH

Wendy Wolford is a Professor of Development Sociology at Cornell University. Her work addresses issues within and between the political economy of development, agrarian studies, social mobilization, land reform, and political ecologies of conservation. Her research in the area of land governance focuses on how reform is actually enacted on the ground. She is also exploring the questions of why political actors from opposite ends of the political spectrum are increasingly looking to land reform as a solution to inequality, and why, then, despite its almost universal appeal, land reform remains the subject of intense conflict. (75 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Gabriela Valdivia valdivia@email.unc.edu for more information.


The Conversion of Linah Mntungwa
Prof. Lauren Jarvis

Friday, January 29, 2016, 4:15 - 5:45 PM
Love House, UNC-CH

Join the Working Group in Feminism and History as Lauren Jarvis, Assistant Professor of History at UNC-Chapel Hill, will share an excerpt from a chapter of her book manuscript in progress, with comments provided by Professor Lisa Lindsay. The manuscript is a history of the Nazaretha Church, one of South Africa’s oldest and largest churches founded by Africans. Each chapter centers on the life of a convert to the faith in order to understand the making–and maintenance–of religious separatism. This presentation uses Linah Mntungwa’s life to explore why so many young African women committed themselves to a rigid faith healing orthodoxy as they swelled the ranks of the church community in the 1910s and 1920s. Attendees are encouraged, but not required, to read the paper in advance. A copy of the paper is available for download from the Working Group in Feminism and History's website. Hard copies will be available at the meeting. Refreshments will be provided and all are welcome to attend. (22 attendees).     Please Contact: Sarah McNamara sarahmc@email.unc.edu for more information.



February 2016

2016 African Film Festival: Faat Kine (2001)
Tuesday, February 2, 2016, 7:00 PM – 9:15 PM
Bryan Center Griffith Film Theater, Duke University

A cheerful movie of simple pleasures, "Faat Kine" stars Venus Seye as the movie's eponymous heroine. Kine is the successful manager of a gasoline station in Dakar, and an unmarried mother of two, each the product of a failed relationship with a delinquent father. Independent, well-to-do, and equable, Kine flits between the demands of her job, her family and her friends with admirable composure. The movie follows Kine's activities with an unobtrusive eye, capturing matter-of-factly the eventfulness of daily life. Confrontations punctuate her relatively comfortable existence, from a tearful quarrel with her restive daughter to a roadside spat with a woman who accuses her of having an affair with her husband. Amid the bustle of Kine's day-to-day routine, the movie offers wistful flashbacks that explain Kine's complex but happy situation. The movie ends on a triumphant note at a party thrown by Kine for her son and daughter, where a climactic meeting between her son and his father offers an explicit glimpse into Sembene's outlook on Senegal's past and future. Light refreshments will be served. (40 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Amadou Fofana afofana@willamette.edu for more information.


SERSAS/SEAN 2016 Spring Conference
What’s in Play? Sport, Leisure, and Culture in Africa

Friday, February 5, 2016 - Saturday, February 6, 2016, All day.
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

The South East Regional Seminar in African Studies (SERSAS) & Southeast Africanist Network (SEAN) will hold their Annual Joint Meeting at the University of Florida in Gainesville. The theme for the conference will be “What’s in Play? Sport, Leisure, and Culture in Africa.” The joint SERSAS/SEAN conference prides itself on providing a collegial and welcoming atmosphere, and we are particularly interested in supporting emerging scholars. Registration is required. Co-sponsored by the African Studies Center, UNC-Chapel Hill and the Center for African Studies, University of Florida. (35 attendees).     Please Contact: Todd Leedy tleedy@ufl.edu for more information.


Cities, People, and Urban Life around the Globe
Saturday, February 6, 2016, 9:15 AM - 5:30 PM
School of Government, UNC-CH

This seminar will discuss the current state of urban life around the globe in the wake of decolonization, foreign investment, civil wars, and population growth. Christian Lentz will use Vietnam, Burma, and Indonesia as case studies for a broader discussion on decolonization and development, while Chérie Rivers Ndaliko will focus on issues related to foreign aid and urban “development” in conflict regions of Africa. Morgan Pitelka will give us a sense of contemporary urban life in three of East Asia’s great cities, while Robin Kirk will discuss human rights issues affecting cities in areas as diverse as Northern Ireland, Peru, and South Africa. All of these themes will inform our discussion on the future of urban life around the globe. More Info   Cost varies.   Please Contact: Rachel Schaevitz racheljs@email.unc.edu for more information.


2016 African Film Festival: Daratt / Dry Season (2006)
Tuesday, February 9, 2016, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Richard White Auditorium, White Hall 107, Duke University

After a forty-year civil war, the radio announces the government has just amnestied the war criminals. Outraged by the news, Gumar Abatcha orders his grandson Atim, a sixteen-year-old youth, to trace the man who killed his father and to execute him. Atim obeys him and, armed with his father's own gun, he goes in search of Nassara, the man who made him an orphan. He is bent on revenge. But instead of a cold-hearted killer, Atim finds a quiet, regal man. Nassara (Youssouf Djaoro) has left killing behind and now is married, goes to the mosque and owns a small bakery. Nassara takes on the young man as an apprentice baker and now Atim just waits for the right moment to strike. Light refreshments will be served. (18 attendees).   Free   Please Contact: Amadou Fofana afofana@willamette.edu for more information.


Foodways in the American South
Friday, February 12, 2016, 12-2:00 PM
Hyde Hall, University Room, UNC-CH

The resilience of enslaved Africans who survived the Middle Passage is reflected in the survival of powerful food cultures that continue to shape and influence the American table, especially in the South. Adrian Miller, the award-winning author of Soul Food: The Surprising Story of an American Cuisine, One Plate at a Time, will "set" and "read" the table as participants dine on Hoppin’ John, okra, and stewed meat in an exploration of West African culture and history in the diaspora. Hosted by Emily Burrill, Women's and Gender Studies and History, and the African Studies Center. Pre-registration is required through the Institute of Arts and Humanities. Registration (30 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Institute for the Arts and Humanities (919) 962-0249 for more information.


UNC Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film
Difret

Tuesday, February 16, 2016, 7 PM.
Stone Center, UNC-CH

Difret is based on the inspirational true story of a young Ethiopian girl and a tenacious lawyer embroiled in a life-or-death clash between cultural traditions and their country’s advancement of equal rights. When 14-year-old Hirut is abducted in her rural village’s tradition of kidnapping women for marriage, she fights back, accidentally killing her captor and intended husband. Local law demands a death sentence for Hirut, but Meaza, a tough and passionate lawyer from a women’s legal aide practice, steps in to fight for her. Difret paints a portrait of a country in a time of great transformation and the brave individuals ready to help shape it. This film screening is presented as part of the Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Films. The event is co-sponsored by the Ethiopian Community Organization in North Carolina (ECONC) and the Sonja Haynes Stone Center.   Free.   Please Contact: Stone Center 919.962.2435 for more information.


2016 African Film Festival: Bab El-Oued City (1994)
Tuesday, February 16, 2016, 7:00 PM – 8:50 PM
Richard White Auditorium, White Hall 107, Duke University

"Bab el-Oued" is working class district of Algiers, shortly after the bloody riots of October 1988. Boualem is a young worker in the district bakery. He works hard at night and sleeps during the day. One morning, he commits a "foolish" act which puts the entire district in turmoil. A group of young extremists headed by Said, sets out in the search of the culprit of this "provocative" act with the intention of making an example by punishing him. Violence settles in and quickly develops when Yamina, Said's younger sister, is caught while meeting Boualem, with whom she is secretly in love. Light refreshments will be served. (25 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Amadou Fofana afofana@willamette.edu for more information.


Tournees Festival
Timbuktu

Thursday, February 18, 2016, 6 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

Based on the 2012 jihadist siege of the titular city in Mali, this film shows a ragtag band of Islamic fundamentalists announcing their increasingly absurd list of prohibitions – no music, no sports, no socializing – to Timbuktu’s denizens, several of whom refuse to follow these strictures, no matter the consequence. Movies are in French with English Subtitles. (120 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Department of Romance Studies for more information.


African Art, Aesthetics and the Socially Progressive Vision
of the Barnes Foundation
Dr. Christa Clarke

Tuesday, February 23, 2016, 5:30-7 PM
Hyde Hall, University Room, UNC-CH

Christa Clarke, a specialist in historic and contemporary African art, is Senior Curator, Arts of Africa and the Americas, and Curator, Arts of Africa, at the Newark Museum. Prior to her appointment at Newark in 2002, Clarke served as the Curator of African Art at the Neuberger Museum. She has been a fellow at the Smithsonian Institution, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Clark Art Institute and held teaching appointments at George Washington University, the Corcoran School of Art, Rutgers University, Purchase College and Drew University. Clarke’s publications include Representing Africa in American Art Museums: A Century of Collecting and Display (co-edited with Kathleen Berzock; 2010; second printing in 2013), which examines the impact of museum practice on the formation of meaning and public perception of African art. She is currently working on a major publication for the Barnes Foundation on its collection of African art. At Newark, Clarke has organized several exhibitions, including Power Dressing: Men’s Fashion and Prestige in Africa (2005), Another Modernity: Works on Paper by Uche Okeke (2006), Embodying the Sacred in Yoruba Art (2008) and Partytime: Re-imagine America, a Centennial Commission by Yinka Shonibare MBE (2009). She is overseeing a major expansion and reinstallation of the African art galleries at Newark planned for 2015 and an accompanying collections catalogue, a project that has received significant support from the NEH and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Tournees Festival
Bande de Filles

Tuesday, February 23, 2016, 6 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

Bande de Filles is set in the impoverished French-African banlieues of Paris, where 16-year-old Marieme cares for her two sisters while their mother works the night shift. She falls in with a triad of tough girls, abandoning her braids for straightened hair, her hoodie for a leather jacket – and learning the pleasures of raising hell. The film will be shown in French with English subtitles. (115 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Department of Romance Studies for more information.


2016 African Film Festival: White Wedding (2009)
Tuesday, February 23, 2016, 7:00 PM – 8:50 PM
Richard White Auditorium, White Hall 107, Duke University

It's modern day South Africa and in Cape Town the beautiful Ayanda (Zandile Msutwana) is just days away from achieving her lifelong dream: the perfect white wedding. The only problem is that her husband-to-be, the loyal, committed Elvis (Kenneth Nkosi) is 1800 kilometres away in Johannesburg. He sets off on Tuesday night by bus to Durban intending to connect with his childhood friend and best-man Tumi (Rapulana Seiphemo). But the plans start to go awry when Tumi doesn't show up at the bus station. Not an auspicious beginning, but this is just the first in many comic and illuminating misadventures they meet along the way. In the end, the two lovers learn that celebrating their union is more about the journey than getting to the church on time. Light refreshments will be served. (28 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Amadou Fofana afofana@willamette.edu for more information.


We Are Proud To Present
A Presentation About The Herero Of Namibia, Formerly Known As South West Africa, From The German Sudwestafrika, Between The Years 1884-1915

Wednesday, February 24, 2016 - Sunday, March 13, 2016,

The PlayMakers Repertory Company will be presenting this production by Jackie Sibblies Drury. In the rehearsal room, a performance piece on a little-known episode of early 20th century genocide takes a jolting turn when the actors - three black and three white - tap into personal resentments and ingrained prejudices. Tensions mount as they expose more of themselves than they ever wanted to. The production has been described as “90 minutes of original, enlightening, pulse-pounding theater” by Backstage, and as “a genuine thunderbolt … devastatingly funny … dangerous and primal” by The Washington Post. It is an emotionally charged journey into the past. Tickets.   Starting at $15   Please Contact: PlayMakers Repertory Company 919-962-7529 for more information.


Art and Peace: The Role of Diplomacy in Ancient Ife Art
Suzanne Blier

Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 12:30 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Suzanne Blier (Harvard) will present a talk on African art and architecture. Blier is the author of Art and Risk in Ancient Yoruba: Ife History, Power and Identity c.1300 (2015 Cambridge University Press) and with David Bindman and Henry Louis Gates, Jr. has edited The Image of the Black in African and Asian Art (Harvard University Press [2016]). Brown Bag Lunch encouraged. (16 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



March 2016

AAAD's 4th Annual Scholarly Conference:
Christianity, Politics, and Social Activism in Africa and the African Diaspora

Friday, March 4, 2016 - Saturday, March 5, 2016, Friday all day, Saturday AM.
Stone Center, Hitchcock Room, UNC-CH

The conference will take up questions surrounding the growing intersections between the political and the religious in contemporary life in Africa and the African diaspora. The conference, sponsored by the Department of African, African American and Diaspora Studies and other units at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will seek to expand and interrogate recent theoretical consideration of the ways religion, and in particular Christianity, has emerged as a critical arena within which political subjectivities emerge and are contested in Africa and the African Diaspora. Conference Website and Program (250 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stephanie Fore 919-966-1295 sfore@email.unc.edu for more information.


Atlantic Bonds:
A 19th Century Odyssey from America to Africa
Prof. Lisa A. Lindsay

Wednesday, March 16, 2016, 2 PM
Diggs Gallery, Winston-Salem State University

Lisa A. Lindsay is Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Associate Professor in the History Department at UNC-Chapel Hill, where she has taught since 1999. A specialist in the social history of southwestern Nigeria, her interests range from colonialism and gender to, more recently, the Atlantic slave trade, the African diaspora, and life histories. She is the author of Working with Gender: Wage Labor and Social Change in Southwestern Nigeria and the textbook Captives as Commodities: The Transatlantic Slave Trade, and the co-editor of Men and Masculinities in Modern Africa and Biography and the Black Atlantic. Lindsay will be presenting the Vaughan saga, which offers insights into the bonds of slavery and family in the African diaspora and highlights the differing prospects for people of African descent on two sides of the 19th century Atlantic world. (70 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Roy Doron doronrs@wssu.edu for more information.


The Place of African Languages in the 21st Century
Dr. Eyamba Bokamba

Tuesday, March 22, 2016, 5-6:30 PM
Dey Hall, Toy Lounge, UNC-CH

Dr. Eyamba Bokamba is a Professor of Linguistics at the University of Illinois, and the author of Tosolola Na Lingala. He will be giving a talk on The Place of African Languages in the 21st Century, with a reception to follow. His paper will consider the premise that African intellectuals and politicians have largely squandered linguistic assets in the advancement of the region since its mass decolonization sixty-six years ago. This type of intellectual self-deportation has occurred in spite of efforts by activist African scholars to redirect it towards beneficial outcomes. The resulting marginalization of African languages, estimated at 2,110 according to Ethnologue (2009), has reverberated outside of Africa where they are treated as non-essential assets to be studied for limited purposes: Fulfillment of foreign language requirements; graduate students’ field research in Africa; and intelligence gathering by non-African governments. He will argue for the essentialization of African languages within and beyond Africa as tools of development, including knowledge production and acquisition, cultural preservation, socio-economic development; and participatory democracy. (75 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Association of African Studies Programs
Annual Spring Meeting

Thursday, March 24, 2016 - Saturday, March 26, 2016, Times vary.
Washington DC.

The annual Washington meeting performs the crucial function of bringing before AASP members a wide range of people whose responsibilities and activities affect African Studies nationally. Thus in any Spring meeting we will typically hear from those with African responsibilities at the U.S. Department of Education; the Council for International Exchange of Scholars; the Black Caucus; the Senate and/or House Committee on Africa; the Department of State; the National Security Council; the Social Science Research Council; the Ford Foundation and/or other foundations with major African commitments; the Council on Foreign Relations; the Kennedy Center’s African Odyssey Initiative; the National Summit on Africa; and TransAfrica, AfricaNews, the Africa Policy Information Center and other NGOs. The purpose of this concentrated dose of Africana is to keep all programs fully abreast of current national trends in policy formation, funding opportunities, NGO activity, fellowships and scholarships, language training, and other activities that impact AASP member’s ability to deliver training about Africa. Conference Site (50 attendees).   $50.   Please Contact: Louise Badiane lbadiane@bridgew.edu for more information.


Furst Forum
Dr. Priscilla Layne

Monday, March 28, 2016, 3:00 PM.
Dey Hall, Room 121, UNC-CH

Department of English and Comparative Literature invites you to the second Furst Forum talk of the Spring semester. Dr. Priscilla Layne, Assistant Professor of German, will speak on "The Future is Unknown: Redefining Blackness in Afro-German Poetry." Light refreshments will be provided. (20 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Kristjan Hannesson kristjan@live.unc.edu for more information.


African Language Fair/Night
Wednesday, March 30, 2016, 1-5 PM Fair; 7 PM African Languages Night
Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Get to know African language instructors, meet past and current African language students, hear about African languages, and watch African language students speak, sing and perform. African Language Night will be held at 7 PM in room 4003, GEC and the African Languages Fair will be held 1-5 PM in the GEC Atrium. Please drop by our table and learn more about African languages at UNC. (45 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Telling Our Stories of Home
Exploring and Celebrating
Changing African-Diaspora Communities

Thursday, March 31, 2016 - Friday, April 8, 2016, times vary.
Various locations, UNC-CH

The current disruptions to African and diasporan communities through war, terrorism, globalization, gentrification, environmental catastrophe, and massive incarceration offer layers of meaning for “home.” This 6-day conference-festival (spread over two weekends, including a 1-week residency for some of the presenters), will bring together outstanding national and international faculty, activists, and performers to offer critical and artistic approaches through a series of workshops, presentations, films, and performances to engage in public and feminist discourses on home. The event will end with the inaugural reading of the commissioned play, Torn Asunder, produced from the scholarly text, Help Me to Find My People, which examines the quest of newly emancipated people to reunite their families and reconstitute their homes after the disruptions of both enslavement and the U.S. Civil War. This conference brings together women from Africa, the Americas, and Asia—a site seldom included in African diaspora studies—and offers an opportunity for UNC-CH and the state of North Carolina to foster change across the globe. Another innovative aspect of this collaboration is the implications home has on issues a range of issues globally and in our back yard, including health outcomes, the carceral state, inclusive/exclusive notions of citizenship, and history. Conference Site (1400 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.



April 2016

***CANCELLED***
Hanes Visiting Artist Lecture
Akinbode Akinbiyi

Tuesday, April 5, 2016, 6 PM.
Hanes Art Center, Room 121, UNC-CH

Akinbode Akinbiyi, photographer, writer, curator, has explored cities in Africa for nearly 40 years. His primary visual focus is on sprawling mega-cities, their veins and arteries often overflowing with bumper to bumper traffic, their frenetic buzz and discordant sounds that overwhelm and disorientate. His preferred mode of working is to wander daily the proverbial mean streets, seeking out moments and situations that encapsulate the very quintessence of the current urbanity. The Hanes Visiting Artist Series brings both established and emerging artists to campus to discuss their work in public lectures and to offer individual critiques to our M.F.A. students. More Info   Free.   Please Contact: Roxana Perez-Mendez rpm@email.unc.edu for more information.


African Diaspora Women Artists Wikipedia Edit-a-thon
Thursday, April 7, 2016, 5-9:00 PM (Drop-ins welcome)
Stone Center Library, UNC-CH

This will be a fun event researching and updating Wikipedia entries on African Diaspora women artists. We invite experienced or new Wikipedians, amateur historians or research pros (We will have a selection of University Library resources and a reference desk staffed by librarians to help you with research. We can also pull additional materials from the Collection as needed), and any UNC faculty, staff, and students. Please bring a laptop. Refreshments will be provided, along with Stone Center and Wikipedia swag to take home. Detailed Information including suggested topics, parking, and information on editing remotely. (21 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Mireille Djenno mdjenno@email.unc.edu for more information.


African Cities and Sustainability
Prof. Garth Myers

Thursday, April 7, 2016 - Friday, April 8, 2016, See description for talk
and location times.

Dr. Myers is the Paul E. Raether Distinguished Professor of Urban International Studies at Trinity College and has published numerous articles and several books on African cities. His research interests include African urban geography and urban planning, Eastern and Southern African development planning, comparative urbanism and comparative urban land politics, and African political geography. Various talks will be offered (at Winston-Salem State University) as follows-- Thursday, April 7 12:30pm – Discussion on Urban Geography/Urban Planning for African Cities, Coltrane 101; 3:30pm – Public Lecture: Grassroots Environmental Activism in Africa’s Cities, Thompson Center 207A. Friday, April 8, 2016: 11:00am – 11:50am – Panel Discussion on Urban Sustainability in Africa: Dealing with Colonial and Post-Colonial Influences, Hill Hall Room L005. (144 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Russell Smith smithrm@wssu.edu for more information.


African Studies Center
Spring Reception and Art Exhibit

Tuesday, April 12, 2016, 5:30-7 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Please join the African Studies Center for a reception and art viewing of recent work by Dr. Amanda Tumusiime at the FedEx Global Education Center. The event will take place Tuesday, April 12 from 5:30-7pm on the fourth floor. Tumusiime is a visiting Fulbright Scholar at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from the Margaret Trowell School of Industrial and Fine Arts at Makarere University in Kampala, Uganda. Tumusiime is a feminist art historian and researcher, a senior lecturer at Makerere University and a painter. Her artwork has been shown in six solo exhibitions and more than 20 art shows. The event will also include a time to say farewell to Amanda Tumusiime and to Ezra Mwakisopile, visiting Fulbright Swahili FLTA at the African Studies Center. Recipients of the African Studies Center's Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship will be recognized. Faculty and Graduate Students especially welcome! Refreshments will be served. (60 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Ingrid Smith ingrids@email.unc.edu for more information.


Dr. Leila Patel
Gender and Social Welfare in South Africa: Lessons from the South

Wednesday, April 13, 2016, 5:30-7 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Leila Patel is the South African Research Chair in Welfare and Social Development and the Director of the Centre for Social Development in Africa. In 2014 she was awarded the Distinguished Woman Scientist Award in the Humanities and Social Sciences and in 2013 she was the Helen Harris Pearlman Visiting Professor of International Social Welfare, University of Chicago (2013). Previously, she was the Head of the Department of Social Work at the University of Johannesburg, the Director General of Social Welfare and Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Vice-Principal of Wits University. She played a leading role in the development of South Africa’s welfare policy. The second edition of her book on Social Welfare and Social Development in South Africa was published by Oxford University Press (2015). (26 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


The Intimacy of Rights
Dr. Harri Englund

Friday, April 15, 2016, 5:00 PM.
Hyde Hall, University Room, UNC-CH

Harri Englund’s research addresses liberalism, democracy, human rights, moral obligation, freedom and equality. His current interests include free speech and the quality of public deliberation in the context of mass and social media. Englund is the author of numerous articles and books, including: Human Rights and African Airwaves: Mediating Equality on the Chichewa Radio (2011); Prisoners of Freedom: Human Rights and the African Poor (2006); and A Democracy of Chameleons: Politics and Culture in the New Malawi (2002). This talk is the keynote address of the conference "Legislating Sexuality and Gender in Africa" and is free and open to the public. (25 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Global Islam and the Arts Teacher Fellows Application
Friday, April 15, 2016, All Day
Online

We invite currently practicing K-12 teachers and curriculum coordinators across North Carolina to participate in the Global Islam & the Arts Teacher Fellows program. This intensive professional development opportunity will feature a year-long exploration of Muslim cultures through music, dance, and dramatic performances during the 2016-17 Carolina Performing Arts season, integrated with readings, scholarship, discussion, and pedagogy. This project aims to deepen teachers’ understanding of global Islam through a cultural arts perspective while dispelling misconceptions and encouraging culturally responsible teaching in the K-12 classroom. Application     Please Contact: Emma Harver 919-962-6732 harver@email.unc.edu for more information.


Colloquium: Legislating Sexuality and Gender in Africa:
Rights, Society and the State

Friday, April 15, 2016 - Saturday, April 16, 2016, All day.
Institute for the Arts and Humanities, UNC-CH

This intensive and interdisciplinary symposium will bring together select scholars working on gender and sexuality in Africa, in order to share informed perspectives and discuss new directions in research. They are committed to exploring critical, interdisciplinary, discussions that seek to identify how advocacy for social change around issues of gender and sexuality can be culturally meaningful and rooted in African social contexts. They believe that building such insight demands a grounded multi-disciplinary approach that integrates perspectives from diverse fields, including political philosophy, history, anthropology, and the law. As scholars situated in the interdisciplinary fields of area and diaspora studies and women’s and gender studies, they are uniquely equipped - and committed - to facilitating a rigorous and critical inquiry into the legislation of sexuality and gender in a number of African contexts. This event is convened by Lydia Boyd, Assistant Professor in AAAD; Emily Burrill, Associate Professor in WGST; and the Director of African Studies Center. Program/More Info (55 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


2016 Dunbar-Stone Lecture and Student Research Conference
Keynote: The Laws Have Hurt Me: State Violence and the Rebirth of White Supremacy

Friday, April 15, 2016 - Saturday, April 16, 2016, See description for times
and locations

The Keynote Lecture of the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies’ Annual Student Research Conference will be presented by Dr. Adriane Lentz-Smith. Dr. Lentz-Smith is an Associate Professor of History, African & African-American Studies, and Women’s Studies at Duke University and the author of Freedom Struggles: African Americans and World War I (Harvard University Press, 2009). A scholar of the twentieth-century black freedom struggle, she is currently writing a book on violence in the late civil rights era. The keynote address will be given Friday, April 15th, 2016, 5:30 – 7:00 pm, in Chapman Hall, Room 201. In addition, the Student Research Conference will be held Saturday, April 16th, 2016, 9:30am – 2:00pm, in the Global Education Center, 4th Floor. (45 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Eunice Sahle sahle@email.unc.edu for more information.



July 2016

“Crazy Negroes and Out-of-Control Crackers: Teaching Civil Rights and Black Power in the Age of Obama” by Dr. Hasan Jeffries
Sunday, July 10, 2016, 6:30 PM.
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 1005, UNC-CH

Please join us for a special public event to kick off the African Diaspora Fellows Program (ADFP) Summer Institute. ADFP is a professional development opportunity for NC teachers through which they enhance their expertise about the histories, politics, and cultures of African, Afro-Latin American, and African American communities. Learn more about ADFP Parking is available for free in the GEC/McCauley parking deck directly below the building. A light reception will follow the keynote address by Dr. Jeffries. (64 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



September 2016

African Studies Center Fall Reception
Thursday, September 8, 2016, 5:30-7 PM.
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

All faculty and graduate students are cordially invited to join us for our Fall Reception. Come reconnect with colleagues and meet new African Studies faculty and graduate students. Please rsvp to Stacey Sewall: sewall@email.unc.edu (50 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Public Lecture
Peter A. Nyong’o

Wednesday, September 14, 2016, 6:30-7:30 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

This public lecture by Kenyan Professor and Senator Peter A. Nyong'o is sponsored by the Department of African, African American, and Diaspora Studies. (170 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Ayana Brown ayanab@email.unc.edu for more information.


Ethics Among the Humanities
Kwame Anthony Appiah

Thursday, September 15, 2016, 5:30-7 PM.
Kenan Theater, Playmakers, UNC-CH

Noted philosopher and author of Assertion and Conditionals and For Truth in Semantics, Kwame Anthony Appiah has taught at Yale, Cornell, Duke, and Harvard universities and lectured at many other institutions in the United States, Germany, Ghana and South Africa, as well as at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris. From 2002 to 2013 he was a member of the Princeton University faculty, where he had appointments in the Philosophy Department and the University Center for Human Values, as well as being associated with the Center for African American Studies, the Programs in African Studies and Translation Studies, and the Departments of Comparative Literature and Politics. In January 2014 he took up an appointment as Professor of Philosophy and Law at New York University, where he teaches both in New York and in Abu Dhabi and at other NYU global centers. More Information can be found on the Parr Center site. (225 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Katie Bunyea kbunyea@unc.edu for more information.


Ever Young: James Barnor
Exhibition Opening and Talk with Curator Renée Mussai

Thursday, September 22, 2016, 7 PM
Stone Center, Robert and Sallie Brown Gallery and Museum, UNC-CH

The Sonja Haynes Stone Center in partnership with Autograph ABP presents a retrospective of James Barnor’s street and studio photographs, spanning Ghana and London from the late 1940s to early 1970s. Through the medium of portraiture, Barnor’s photographs represent societies in transition: Ghana moving towards its independence and London becoming a cosmopolitan, multicultural metropolis. (47 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Clarissa Goodlett cgoodlet@email.unc.edu for more information.


Ever Young: James Barnor Exhibition
Thursday, September 22, 2016 - Friday, October 28, 2016, ongoing.
Stone Center, Robert and Sallie Brown Gallery and Museum, UNC-CH

The Sonja Haynes Stone Center in partnership with Autograph ABP presents a retrospective of James Barnor’s street and studio photographs, spanning Ghana and London from the late 1940s to early 1970s. James Barnor’s career covers a remarkable period in history, bridging continents and photographic genres to create a transatlantic narrative marked by his passionate interest in people and cultures. Through the medium of portraiture, Barnor’s photographs represent societies in transition: Ghana moving towards its independence and London becoming a cosmopolitan, multicultural metropolis. The exhibition showcases a range of street and studio photographs – modern and vintage - with elaborate backdrops, fashion portraits, and social documentary features, many commissioned for pioneering South African magazine Drum during the ‘swinging 60s’ in London.   Free.   Please Contact: Clarissa Goodlett cgoodlet@email.unc.edu for more information.


Equatorial Guinea: Oil, Poverty, and Corruption
Tutu Alicante

Thursday, September 29, 2016, 5:30-7 PM
Fedex Global Education Center, Room 3024, UNC-CH

Tutu Alicante is the founder and Executive Director of Equatorial Guinea Justice, a U.S. based organization which works to promote human rights, the rule of law, transparency, and civic participation in Equatorial Guinea. This talk is part of the new Thursday Jama series sponsored by the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. The Thursday Jama is open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. Light refreshments will be served. (10 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Language, Literature, Education, and Liberation in Africa and the African Diaspora
7th Annual SEALLF Conference

Friday, September 30, 2016 - Saturday, October 1, 2016, All day.
Winston Salem State University, Winston Salem, North Carolina

The South East African Languages and Literatures Forum (SEALLF) is an annual conference organized by a group of scholars working on African language pedagogy, linguistics, and literature.   Cost Varies.   Please Contact: Leonard Muaka muakale@wssu.edu for more information.



October 2016

Artist Lecture: Zanele Muholi
Thursday, October 6, 2016, 7:00 PM
North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC

Zanele Muholi, internationally acclaimed South African photographer, 2016 recipient of the International Center for Photography’s Infinity Award for Documentary and Photojournalism, and self-described “visual activist,” speaks about her work. Followed by Q&A. More Info This lecture is made possible by the Cyma Rubin Photography Fund. It is presented in partnership with the Cassilhaus Artist-in-Residence program and is part of the Click! Triangle Photography Festival.   Free. (Tickets Required)   Please Contact: North Carolina Museum of Art (919) 839-6262 for more information.


POSTPONED
The Quest for Autonomy
Fall SERSAS Conference

Friday, October 7, 2016 - Saturday, October 8, 2016, All day.
College of Charleston, Charleston, SC

The South East Regional Seminar in African Studies (SERSAS) meets in the Fall and Spring. This year's ASA conference theme is "Imagining Africa at the Center: Bridging Scholarship, Policy, and Representation in African Studies." The Fall 2016 SERSAS Conference invites participants to analyze the continuing struggle of African nations and their citizenry to exercise control over their own fates. For CFP (due September 7) and more information, contact Ken Wilburn: WILBURNK@ecu.edu   Cost Varies.   Please Contact: Ken Wilburn WILBURNK@ecu.edu for more information.


From Rebelling to Ruling: Insurgent Victory and State Capture in the Horn of Africa
Prof. Michael Woldemariam

Thursday, October 13, 2016, 5:30-7 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 3024, UNC-CH

This talk, by Prof. Michael Woldemariam of Boston University, is part of the new Thursday Jama series sponsored by the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. Prof. Woldemariam’s teaching and research interests focus on African politics, particularly the dynamics of armed conflict, the behavior of rebel organizations and self-determination movements, and post-conflict institution building. He has special expertise in the Horn of Africa, and has conducted fieldwork in Ethiopia, Mozambique, Somaliland, South Africa, and India. This talk will explore the political trajectories of victorious insurgent groups, and ask why some have built new and durable political orders, while others have failed to capitalize on their military success and consolidate their authority. This talk is based on an analysis of the Horn of Africa, with a special focus on Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Somalia. The Thursday Jama is open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. Light refreshments will be served. (13 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Barbara Anderson b_anderson@unc.edu for more information.


Written cities: Linguistic Landscapes of the Urban Sahel
Prof. Fiona McLaughlin

Monday, October 24, 2016, 6 PM.
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 3024, UNC-CH

Dr. Fiona McLaughlin, of the Department of Languages, Literatures, & Cultures at the University of Florida, will present a talk. Presented with support from the African Studies Center, the Department of Linguistics, and Carolina Performing Arts. (30 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Victoria Rovine vrovine@email.unc.edu for more information.


Sufi Songs: Youssou N’Dour
Tuesday, October 25, 2016, 7:30 PM
Memorial Hall, Carolina Performing Arts, UNC-CH

Throughout a 30-year recording career, Youssou N’Dour’s roots in Senegalese traditional music and griot storytelling have remained the hallmark of his artistic personality. Transforming his native mbalax music with influences from Cuban rumba, reggae, hip hop, jazz and soul, he is a daring innovator and staunch protector of the unique “Dakar overgroove.” N’Dour and his high-energy band Super Etoile fashion a sound that is both characteristically Senegalese and outward-looking—a contagiously exciting synthesis of musical languages. This performance features a selection of songs from the Sufi tradition including music from the Grammy-winning album Egypt, a deeply spiritual album dedicated to a more tolerant view of Islam. N’Dour will be joined by guest Senegalese vocalists Moustapha Mbaye and Alioune Badara along with members of Super Etoile. This event is part of the Sacred/Secular: A Sufi Journey series presented by Carolina Performing Arts. (1450 attendees).   Check website for ticket prices.   Please Contact: Carolina Performing Arts 919‑843‑3333 for more information.


The Art of Emergency: Aesthetics and Aid in African Crises
Thursday, October 27, 2016 - Friday, October 28, 2016, Time TBA.
Institute for the Arts and Humanities, UNC-CH

This will be an interdisciplinary conference taking place at the Institute for the Arts and Humanities on the UNC Campus. More Information (90 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Chérie Rivers Ndaliko ndaliko@email.unc.edu for more information.



November 2016

Communities of Faith and Economies of Tradition in Apartheid South Africa
Prof. Lauren Jarvis)

Thursday, November 3, 2016, 5:30-7 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

This talk by Lauren Jarvis (UNC History Department) is part of the new Thursday Jama series sponsored by the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. The Thursday Jama is open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. Light refreshments will be served. (8 attendees).     Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Boyhood: Tracking in the Rhodesian Army during the Zimbabwe War of Liberation (1964-1979)
Prof. Luise White

Thursday, November 10, 2016, 5-7 PM.
Hamilton Hall, Room 569, UNC-CH

This talk by Prof. Luise White (History, University of Florida and NEH Fellow 2016-17) is hosted by the Duke-UNC Gender, War, and Culture Series. The GWC Series strives to create opportunities for interdisciplinary dialogue, intellectual collaboration, and scholarly camaraderie for faculty and students in N.C. The talk will be moderated by Prof. Emily Burrill (Women’s and Gender Studies and History; Director, African Studies Center, UNC-Chapel Hill). GWC seminars are open to members of the academic community throughout the state of North Carolina and beyond: faculty, graduate students and interested undergraduates students are welcome. More Info (25 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Karen Hagemann hagemann@unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Session
Monday, November 14, 2016, 10 AM.
Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2017-2018 Academic Year, and Summer 2017 will be due January 31, 2017. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. The remaining info sessions will be on Nov. 15, 16, and 17. Each session will cover the same information.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Session
Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 2 PM.
Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2017-2018 Academic Year, and Summer 2017 will be due January 31, 2017. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. The remaining info sessions will be on Nov. 16, and 17. Each session will cover the same information.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Session
Wednesday, November 16, 2016, Noon.
School of Law, Room 4082, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2017-2018 Academic Year, and Summer 2017 will be due January 31, 2017. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers. This session will address the particular concerns of students in the School of Law. The remaining general info session will be on Nov. 17. Each session will cover the same information.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


FLAS Info Session
Thursday, November 17, 2016, 11 AM.
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 3009, UNC-CH

The African Studies Center offers Academic Year and Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for Graduate and Undergraduate students. Applications for the 2017-2018 Academic Year, and Summer 2017 will be due January 31, 2017. More information on ASC FLAS can be found at our FLAS page. This informational meeting is designed to answer questions from prospective applicants and will be a joint meeting with other area studies centers.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Out of the Picture and Off the Map:
A Refreshed Look at Arts Identified as Senufo

Thursday, November 17, 2016, 6:15 PM.
Hanes Art Center, Room 218, UNC-CH

Prof. Susan Elizabeth Gagliardi, from the Department of Art History at Emory University will present a talk. Dr. Gagliardi specializes in arts sponsored by Senufo- and Mande-speaking communities and is the author of Senufo Unbound: Dynamics of Art and Identity in West Africa. This talk will address the question: who defines arts as Senufo? When, where, why, how, on what basis, and for what ends do they do so? In this lecture, Dr. Gagliardi demonstrates that a work’s correspondence to an art-historical style defined by a cultural or ethnic group may reveal little, if anything, about that work other than how connoisseurs have classified it. Rather, each object, assemblage, installation, or performance offers boundless possibilities for considering the historical dynamism, localized contexts, individual agency, and aesthetic concerns contributing to and shaped by that work’s production and reception. Refreshments will be served. (50 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Victoria Rovine vrovine@email.unc.edu for more information.



January 2017

Prof. Pamela Jagger
The Challenge of Household Air Pollution for Sub-Saharan Africa

Thursday, January 26, 2017, 5:30 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Dr. Pam Jagger will give a talk on her work on household energy in Malawi and Rwanda. Dr. Jagger (UNC, Public Policy) conducts research on the livelihood impacts of natural resource management policies and projects in sub-Saharan Africa. Jagger leads the Forest Use, Energy and Livelihoods (FUEL) lab at UNC-Chapel Hill. FUEL lab research focuses on institutional innovations and the implications of institutional change in the forestry and energy sectors for welfare outcomes in Africa. Jagger has worked at the International Food Policy Research Institute, Resources for the Future, and the World Bank. She has 15 years of applied research experience and has conducted socioeconomic surveys in Ethiopia, Malawi, Uganda and Zimbabwe. This talk is part of the Thursday Jama series sponsored by the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. The Thursday Jama is open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. Light refreshments will be served. (16 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Global Careers Workshop
Saturday, January 28, 2017, 9:30 AM - 1:30 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

Learn what should be included in your resume and cover letters, how to sell your international experience, and what it's like to navigate the interview process. Dr. David Patton, Executive Vice President of the American Council on International Education, will lead the general session. Breakout sessions by world regions will follow. More Information and Detailed Schedule   Free.   Please Contact: Shai Tamari tamari@unc.edu for more information.



February 2017

SERSAS/SEAN Conference
21st Century Resiliency: Sustainable Development and U.S.-Africa Relations

Friday, February 3, 2017 - Saturday, February 4, 2017, All day.
College of Charleston, Charleston, SC

The Southeastern Regional Seminar in African Studies (SERSAS) and the SouthEast Africanist Network (SEAN) are pleased to announce a joint conference to be hosted by the College of Charleston in historic downtown Charleston, SC. Sustainable Development has garnered increased attention and support in recent years in the West, but has long been applicable to Africa. In what ways do African examples reflect possibilities for a more resilient world? Call for proposals closes Jan. 2, 2017. Please visit College of Charleston African Studies for more information, including details on conference registration and proposal submission guidelines.   Cost varies.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Mohamed Abubakr
Wednesday, February 8, 2017, 6:30 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Mandela Auditorium, UNC-CH

Mohamed Abubakr, a civil and human rights activist from Sudan, will share his personal story and speak about the war in Darfur, the asylum seekers and refugees challenges across Africa, the Middle East and Europe in the current world climate. Abubakr co-founded the SudanAid association and the Of Noor Foundation, a multidisciplinary non-profit organization dedicated to education, empowerment of youth and women, assisting victims of persecution and humanitarian assistance. He has been a member of the YaLa Young Leaders Middle East peace movement, actively engaging in dialogue and cooperation across the Middle East. (65 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Ran Laviv rlaviv@nchillel.org for more information.


Legislating Memory in Rwanda
Prof. Thomas Kelley

Thursday, February 9, 2017, 5:30 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Prof. Tom Kelley (School of Law, UNC-CH) will give a talk on the government of Rwanda’s use of legal and extra-legal means to control memory and history in their country. The regime, to the extent it admits its actions, justifies them as necessary to maintain stability and avoid a repeat of the country’s horrific 1994 genocide. But increasingly, critics claim that Rwanda’s president, Paul Kagame, along with his ruling coterie, are tailoring memory and history with the aim of legitimizing their increasingly autocratic rule. American legal scholars who focus on Rwanda tend to describe what is happening in terms of 1st Amendment values, focusing their attention on the Rwandan government’s suppression of political speech. This talk takes a different approach. Borrowing from the disciplines of history, historiography, and memory studies, it argues that Rwanda’s government is surpassing mere suppression of speech and engaging in a comprehensive effort to rewrite history and reprogram its citizens’ collective memory. This talk is part of the Thursday Jama series sponsored by the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. The Thursday Jama is open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. Light refreshments will be served. (12 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Prof. Dave Pier
Song for a King's Exile: Royalism and Popular Music in Postcolonial Uganda

Thursday, February 16, 2017, 5:30 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

In 1971, Uganda’s President Idi Amin arranged for the return of the body of Kabaka Edward Muteesa II from Britain, where it had been temporarily interred since the king’s death in that country two years earlier. That year, Dan Mugula, pioneer of the kadongo kamu pop music genre, composed “Muteesa, Baalaba Taliiwo Buganda,” a song that expressed the grief and resentment people of the Baganda ethnicity had been feeling since their king was forced into exile in 1966. Nearly four decades later, in 2010, this old song surfaced again on YouTube, now with a new music video showing recent acts of police brutality and the desecration of a royal monument. Focusing on this song and its recent digital re-contextualization, this article explores how music can work to bring a past historical crisis into the living present, giving the community that experienced that crisis a reassuring, if fatalistic, sense of its own historical continuity. This talk is part of the Thursday Jama series sponsored by the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. The Thursday Jama is open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. Light refreshments will be served. (11 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


The Yoruba Path: Knowledge, Capital, and the Birth of a Community of Practice
Monday, February 20, 2017, 3:35PM
Graham Memorial Building, Room 039, UNC-CH

Dr. Akin Ogundiran is Chair of the Africana Studies Department and a Professor of African Studies, Anthropology and History at UNC-Charlotte. As an archaeological anthropologist and cultural historian, his research focuses on emergent societies and complexity in Yorubaland, Atlantic Africa, and the African Diaspora in the past 700 years. He specializes in community formation, landscape history, materiality, sacred groves, and empires. Ogundiran has published widely on these themes and his most recent book, Materialities of Ritual in the Black Atlantic (Indiana U. Press, 2014) was selected as a Choice Outstanding Academic Title in 2015. Sponsored by the Heritage and Unwritten Histories Concentration within the UNC Department of Anthropology. Co-sponsored by the African Studies Center. Light refreshments will be served. (100 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Patricia McAnany mcanany@email.unc.edu for more information.


Tournées French Film Festival 2017
Tuesday, February 21, 2017 - Thursday, March 9, 2017, 6:30-9:00
Nelson Mandela Auditorium of the Fedex Global Education Center

Six French films will be screened through February and March. All films will be screened in Nelson Mandela Auditorium of the Fedex Global Education Center. Doors will open at 6:30pm, and the screenings will start at 7:00. All films are free and open to the public, and refreshments will be served before each film. Of particular interest to African Studies might be School of Babel, screening on February 27th and May Allah Bless France!, screening on March 7th. (420 attendees).   Free   Please Contact: Maury Bruhn 984-364-9578 mbruhn@email.unc.edu for more information.



March 2017

Transitional Justice in Africa: Promises and Pitfalls
Prof. Makau W. Mutua

Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 5:30 PM.
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Leading Kenyan legal scholar Prof. Mutua, is a distinguished professor at SUNY Buffalo, where he also served as Dean of the Law School. A member of the Council on Foreign Affairs, Matua joined the World Bank in 2015 to work on governance and human rights. In January, 2017, he was elected to a four-year term as Chairman of the Board of Advisors of the Rome-based International Development Law Organization, where he had served as Vice Chair since 2016. This talk is part of the Thursday Jama series sponsored by the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. The Thursday Jama is open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. Light refreshments will be served. (14 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Egypt: Then and Now - A Dialogues Seminar
Saturday, March 18, 2017, 9 AM-12:30 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 1009, UNC-CH

Archaeologist Jennifer Gates-Foster will discuss how life in Egypt changed during the era of Greek and Roman rule (4th century BC-7th century AD). She will discuss changes in the administration and organization of the country and its cities, including Alexandria, as well as the transformations that took in religious practices, domestic settings and burial customs. Next, author and Arabic scholar, Doria El-Kerdany, will speak about her hometowns of Cairo and Mansoura and offer insight into the daily lives of Egyptians today including issues of education, entertainment, politics and religion. Our seminar will conclude with a panel discussion featuring both scholars fielding your questions on Egypt past, present, or future. This event is sponsored by the Program in the Humanities and the General Alumni Association, in collaboration with the African Studies Center and Carolina Center for the study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations. Purchase tickets (50 attendees).   See link for cost information.   Please Contact: Emma Harver harver@email.unc.edu for more information.


The Alchemist of Congo:
(Im)migration, Race, and Identity in the African Diaspora
Prof. Chérie Ndaliko

Thursday, March 23, 2017, 2:30-4pm
Stone Center, Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, UNC-CH

A 2016-17 IAAR Faculty Fellow, Professor Ndaliko will present from her book project that explores musical mediations of race and (im)migration through the works of Congolese pianist and composer Ray Lema, whose music has animated social and political movements in Africa, Europe, and North and South America. iaar.unc.edu/events   Free.   Please Contact: Institute for African American Research 919.962.6810 iaar@unc.edu for more information.


Workshop on Ugandan Instruments with James Isabirye
Friday, March 24, 2017, 2-4 PM.
Woollen Gym, Room 304, UNC-CH

Visiting Ugandan folklorist and musician, James Isabirye, will be demonstrating Ugandan traditional instruments, such as the embaire xylophone, and discussing their traditional and modern social contexts. This free event is public, and participants will have opportunities to examine and play the instruments. Isabirye, one of Uganda’s foremost experts on traditional music, has served as an advisor to UNESCO, as well as to the global music internet project “Singing Wells”. (15 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Dave Pier dpier@email.unc.edu for more information.


Dunbar-Stone Lecture
Infra-Politics in Rwanda: Rural Activism Before and After the Genocide
Prof. Catharine Newbury

Friday, March 24, 2017, 5:00-7:00PM
Caldwell Hall, Room 105, UNC-CH

This talk is part of the Department of African, African American, & Diaspora Studies Undergraduate Research Conference, which continues the next day with student research presentations. Prof. Newbury will give a talk on the post-genocide government in Rwanda, which has introduced a series of policies designed to create a “new Rwanda.” A number of these policies focus on rural areas of the country, where the majority of Rwandans live and where food and cash crop production by smallholders is important for both the local and the national economies. The post-genocide government’s ambitious efforts at social engineering have included villagization, land reform, regional crop specialization, and the reorganization of administrative structures. To many observers Rwanda’s policies of recent years represent a dramatic change from the 1980s and the early 1990s. What have been the effects of state-sponsored policies on rural lives since 1994? And how have rural residents responded? This lecture will explore these questions. More Info (60 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Michael Lambert mlambert@email.unc.edu for more information.


Undergraduate Research Conference
Dept. of African, African American, & Diaspora Studies

Saturday, March 25, 2017, 9 AM- 5 PM
Graham Memorial, Room 039, UNC-CH

This annual conference will feature UNC Chapel Hill students presenting their own research. The featured speaker for the conference will be Dr. Catharine Newbury, who will be speaking on March 24. More Info (200 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: Michael Lambert mlambert@email.unc.edu for more information.


World View: 2017 Africa Seminar
Stories of Africa: Connected Over Time and Across the Globe

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - Thursday, March 30, 2017, 1:30-5 Wed, 8-3:30 Thu
The Friday Center, UNC-CH

Heeding novelist Chimamanda Adichie’s warning about the dangers of hearing only a single story about a person or country, World View’s 2017 Africa seminar will highlight the diversity of lived experiences within the continent of Africa and the interconnectedness of Africa with other nations—including the United States—and North Carolina. Speakers include William Kamkwamba, Kathryn Mathers, Georges Nzongola, and Seun Bello Olamosu. For detailed program and registration information please visit World View.   See World View page for cost details.   Please Contact: World View 919.962.9264 for more information.


Introduction to Malawi and Chichewa: A Workshop on Chichewa Language and Malawi Culture
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - Thursday, April 6, 2017, 5:30PM-7:30PM
UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Beard Hall, Room 116, UNC-CH

This four-part workshop will focus on introductory Chichewa greetings and linguistics, medical interview vocabulary, and cultural sensitivity in health services for UNC students, staff and faculty planning research, service or internships in Malawi. Workshop sessions cover elementary language construction, health and cultural training, as well as brief presentations on the history, geography, politics and economy of Malawi. Participants will be provided soft copies of readings and basic language material. Dinner will be provided. The sessions will be held on March 29th, March 30th, April 5th, and April 6th. Attendance at a minimum of 3 sessions is required. Space is limited - please register by emailing Mamie Harris at malawi@unc.edu. Sponsored by the UNC African Studies Center and the UNC Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases.   Free.   Please Contact: Mamie Harris malawi@unc.edu for more information.


Prof. Daniel Sayers
A Desolate Place for a Defiant People:
The Archeology of Maroons, Indigenous Americans, and Enslaved Laborers in the Great Dismal Swamp

Thursday, March 30, 2017, 7-9:00 PM
Sonja Haynes Stone Center, UNC-CH

In the first thorough archaeological examination of this unique region, Daniel Sayers exposes and unravels the complex social and economic systems developed by these defiant communities that thrived on the periphery. He develops an analytical framework based on the complex interplay between alienation, diasporic exile, uneven geographical development, and modes of production to argue that colonialism and slavery inevitably created sustained critiques of American capitalism. Daniel O. Sayers is Associate Professor of Anthropology at American University. This talk is part of the Stone Center Writer's Discussion Series. More Info (82 attendees).   Free.   Please Contact: The Stone Center 919-962-9001 for more information.


Dia.gnosis Carolina Conference for Romance Studies
Thursday, March 30, 2017 - Saturday, April 1, 2017, All day.
Location TBD.

The growing transdisciplinary nature of the humanities has shown how our analyses of literatures and cultures can strengthen when placed under multiple and sometimes unexpected lenses. Recent studies into the exchanges between neuroscience and philosophy, computer science and the arts, or ecology and literature, just to name a few, demonstrate scholars’ increasing interest in the rhizomatic nature of human interaction. In Romance Studies today, how are our explorations of literature, film, performance and language influenced by the sciences and vice versa? The 23rd annual Carolina Conference for Romance Studies will explore these topics in an engaging multi-language, interdisciplinary conference. Please see the Call for Papers for more information on the conference and on submitting a paper.   Free.   Please Contact: Angela Ritter alpeters@email.unc.edu for more information.



April 2017

Fifth Annual Global Africana Conference
Black Feminist Futures: Re-envisioning Gender & Sexuality in Global Black Communities

Thursday, April 6, 2017 - Friday, April 7, 2017,
See description for event times.

The Department of African, African American and Diaspora Studies will host their annual Global Africana Conference. Keynote Speakers will be Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, acclaimed Nigerian author of Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun, and Americanah; and Faye Harrison, feminist anthropologist from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Event times: 4/6, 5 - 6:30 PM, Hyde Hall, University Room; 4/7, 9 AM - 5 PM, Dey Hall, Toy Lounge and also 4/7, 5:30-7 PM Memorial Hall More Information and Registration   Free.   Please Contact: Stephanie Fore sfore@email.unc.edu for more information.


POSTPONED
Prof. Chérie Rivers Ndaliko
Necessary Noise:
Music, Film, and Charitable Imperialism in the East of Congo

Tuesday, April 11, 2017, 3:30-5 PM.
Bullshead Bookshop, UNC Student Stores, UNC-CH

In this talk, part of the Stone Center Writer’s Discussion Series, Prof. Ndaliko will discuss her new book Necessary Noise: Music, Film, and Charitable Imperialism in the East of Congo. While the DRC is often portrayed in international media as an unproductive failed state, the Congolese have turned increasingly to art-making to express their experience to external eyes. Author Chérie Rivers Ndaliko argues that cultural activism and the enthusiasm to produce art exists in Congo as a remedy for the social ills of war and as a way to communicate a positive vision of the country. Ndaliko introduces a memorable cast of artists, activists, and ordinary people from the North-Kivu province, whose artistic and cultural interventions are routinely excluded from global debates that prioritize economics, politics, and development as the basis of policy decision about Congo. Chérie Rivers Ndaliko is a professor in the Music Department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and co-director of the Yole!Africa cultural center in Goma, Democratic Republic of the Congo. More Info   Free.   Please Contact: The Stone Center 919-962-9001 for more information.


The Promotion of Democratic Governance in Africa by the African Union
Prof. Georges Nzongola

Thursday, April 13, 2017, 5:30 PM.
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Prof. Nzongola is the author of several books and numerous articles on African politics, development, and conflict issues. He is the editor of The Crisis in Zaire: Myths and Realities and of Conflict in the Horn of Africa, and co-editor of The State and Democracy in Africa and of The Oxford Companion to Politics of the World (both the first and second editions). His major work, The Congo from Leopold to Kabila: A People’s History, won the 2004 Best Book Award of the African Politics Conference Group (APCG), an organization of U.S.-based political scientists specializing on Africa. This talk is part of the Thursday Jama series sponsored by the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. The Thursday Jama is open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. Light refreshments will be served.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


African Languages Fair/Night
Wednesday, April 19, 2017, 10 AM - 1 PM, 5-7 PM
GEC, Room 4003 and the Quad, UNC-CH

Get to know African language instructors, meet past and current African language students, hear about African languages, and watch African language students speak, sing and perform. African Language Night will be held at 5 PM in room 4003, GEC and the African Languages Fair will be held 10 Am- 1 PM in the quad. Please drop by our table and learn more about African languages at UNC.   Free.   Please Contact: Esther Lisanza lisanza@email.unc.edu for more information.


African Studies Center Spring Reception
Thursday, April 20, 2017, 5:30-7 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Please join us in celebrating a year of successful programs, and in honoring retiring William E. Leuchtenburg Professor of African Studies, and Professor of Law, Dr. Bereket Selassie.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



September 2017

8th Annual SEALLF Conference
Friday, September 29, 2017 - Saturday, September 30, 2017, All day.
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

The South East African Languages and Literatures Forum (SEALLF) is an annual conference organized by a group of scholars working on African language pedagogy, linguistics, and literature. This year's theme is: African Languages and Literatures in the Era of Globalization. Africa has been undergoing rapid social processes over the years. These changes have propelled Africa from the pre-colonial era, through the colonial era to the postcolonial era. The postcolonial era has ushered Africa into the era of globalization. The era of globalization unlike the pre-colonial and colonial eras has had a great implication on African languages and literatures. The question, which we ask is: What opportunities and challenges does the era of globalization present to African languages and literatures? Each prospective presenter should submit electronically an abstract of 250 words (please contact the organizers for detailed information on thematic content) to the organizing committee: at lisanza@email.unc.edu by Monday May 26, 2017. Abstracts should include the presenter’s name, title of paper, institutional affiliation, and contact information.   Contact organizer for cost information.   Please Contact: Esther Lisanza lisanza@email.unc.edu for more information.