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Events Calendar


The African Studies Center hosts and co-sponsors a wide array of talks, conferences, symposiums, and seminars by internationally renowned intellectuals, artists, and scholars.

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January

Dr. Kamela Heyward-Rotimi
Global Black Scholars’ Limited Access to Digitized Academic Knowledge

Thursday, January 18, 2018, 3-4:30 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Dr. Heyward-Rotimi is a public anthropologist and researcher specializing in the equitable appropriation of, access to, and the production of digital knowledge by groups of the African diaspora. She will discuss her current project on developing an open-source digital repository to support the bidirectional exchange of scholarship for researchers at institutions in Africa and the Caribbean as well as those at Historically Black Colleges and Universities.   Free.   Please Contact: Institute for African American Research iaar@unc.edu for more information.


Complexity Galore: Governance and Outcomes of Sustainability Initiatives in Africa
Prof. Stefano Ponte

Thursday, January 25, 2018, 5:30 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

New and more complex partnerships are emerging to address the sustainability of natural resource use in Africa. These partnerships variously link donors, governments, community-based organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), business, certification agencies and other intermediaries. Yet, we still do not know whether more sophisticated organizational structures, more stakeholders involved, and more advanced participatory processes have delivered better sustainability outcomes, and if so, in what sectors and under what circumstances. The ‘New Partnerships for Sustainability’ (NEPSUS) research project assembles a multidisciplinary team to analyze sustainability partnerships in three key natural resource sectors in Tanzania: forestry, wildlife and coastal resources. In this presentation, Prof. Stefano Ponte, of the Department of Business and Politics at Copenhagen Business School, explores some of the main conceptual issues arising in this effort and presents preliminary results. Ponte is particularly interested in sustainability trajectories, in how sustainability standards, labels and certifications shape agro-food value chains, and in how different forms of partnerships affect sustainability outcomes. He has authored or edited eight books, including, most recently, the monograph Brand Aid: Shopping Well to Save the World (with Lisa Ann Richey, Minnnesota University Press, 2011). This talk is part of the Thursday Jama series sponsored by the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. The Thursday Jama is open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. Light refreshments will be served.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


SERSAS/SEAN 2018 Spring Conference
Friday, January 26, 2018 - Saturday, January 27, 2018, All day.
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

The South East Regional Seminar in African Studies (SERSAS) & Southeast Africanist Network (SEAN) will hold their Annual Joint Meeting at the University of Florida in Gainesville. The joint SERSAS/SEAN conference prides itself on providing a collegial and welcoming atmosphere, and we are particularly interested in supporting emerging scholars. Co-sponsored by the African Studies Center, UNC-Chapel Hill and the Center for African Studies, University of Florida.   Registration/fee is required.   Please Contact: Todd Leedy tleedy@ufl.edu for more information.



February

Prof. Brigitte Seim
Thursday, February 1, 2018, 5:30 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

Brigitte Seim is an Asst. Professor of Public Policy at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her work focuses on comparative politics and the political economy of development. She examines the relationship between citizens and political officials, with a particular emphasis on accountability in developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa. This talk is part of the Thursday Jama series sponsored by the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. The Thursday Jama is open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. Light refreshments will be served.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.


Prof. Joseph Mensah
African Immigrants in Canada and the Racial Discrimination Boomerang

Thursday, February 22, 2018, 5:30 PM.
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 1005, UNC-CH

The Black population in Canada today is highly diverse; it includes the Canadian-born descendants of those who came through the slave trade; the descendants of those who migrated from the U.S. before and after the Civil War; and Blacks who immigrated from the Caribbean, African, and other countries in recent decades. Notwithstanding this diversity, portrayals of Blacks as a homogeneous group abound in the Canadian public discourse and academic writings. This presentation will deal with the immigration, socioeconomic conditions, and experiences of racism among Blacks in Canada, paying particular attention to Black continental Africans. Prof. Joseph Mensah is Chair of the Department of Geography at York University in Toronto. A first-generation African-Canadian intellectual, born and raised in post-colonial Ghana where he did his B.A., he has written widely on Cultural Studies, transnational and return migration, ethno-racial identity formation, and African development. His most recent book, written with Christopher J. Williams, is entitled Boomerang Ethics: How Racism Affects Us All. This talk is part of the Thursday Jama series sponsored by the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. The Thursday Jama is open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. Light refreshments will be served.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



March

Prof. Charles Piot
Migration Stories: The US Visa Lottery and Global Citizenship

Thursday, March 22, 2018, 5:30 PM
FedEx Global Education Center, Room 4003, UNC-CH

More Togolese per capita apply for the US Diversity (Green Card) lottery than those from any other African country, with winners attempting to game the system by adding “spouses” and dependents to their dossiers. The US consulate in Lomé knows this gaming is going on and constructs ever-more elaborate tests to attempt to decipher the authenticity of winners’ marriages and job profiles – and of their moral worth as citizens – tests that immediately circulate to those on the street. This presentation explores the cat-and-mouse game between street and embassy, situating it within the post-Cold War conjuncture – of ongoing crisis, of an eviscerated though-still-dictatorial state, of social death and the emptiness of citizenship under such conditions, of a sprawling transnational diaspora and the desires and longings it creates, of informationalism and its new technologies, of surveillance regimes and their travails, and of the way in which mobility/immobility and sovereignty are newly entangled and co-constitutive in the contemporary moment. This talk is part of the Thursday Jama series sponsored by the Carolina Seminar in African Ecology and Social Processes. The Thursday Jama is open to all area faculty and graduate students in any discipline. Light refreshments will be served.   Free.   Please Contact: Stacey Sewall sewall@email.unc.edu for more information.



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